Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
gertlush

How soon to ski after broken leg?

Recommended Posts

Broke my fibula Dec 2nd quite low down and had 4 screws and a plate put in. The ankle, ligaments etc were all untouched. The ortho doc advised me to stay on crutches until Jan 22nd. That's all fine and my recovery is going well.

 

Does anyone have experience of recovering from a leg injury and how quickly you can ski again? I was thinking poss. in Feb I could get out and do some skinning up hills and just glide back down. I'll save the more streno stuff until sometime in March. Is that crazy talk? When is my bone actually "healed"

 

Ryan

Edited by gertlush

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Broke my fibula Dec 2nd quite low down and had 4 screws and a plate put in. The ankle, ligaments etc were all untouched. The ortho doc advised me to stay on crutches until Jan 22nd. That's all fine and my recovery is going well.

 

Does anyone have experience of recovering from a leg injury and how quickly you can ski again? I was thinking poss. in Feb I could get out and do some skinning up hills and just glide back down. I'll save the more streno stuff until sometime in March. Is that crazy talk? When is my bone actually "healed"

 

Ryan

 

Ryan - no one understands you injury and healing timeline better than your Ortho....why are you asking us? One thing you consider is that regardless of the speed of bone healing, you will undoubtedly have a great deal of atrophication, and with inadequate muscle strength to stabilize joints (knee, ankle, etc.) you may be at higher risk of injury to areas not directly related to your initial injury. Again, the ortho or a PT is the appropriate person to evaluate your functional stability.

 

A good PT will tyipcally have exposure to patients of many different surgeons, and might be able to give you feedback on the reputation of your surgeon relative to others - specifically as it relates to their conservatism for post-injury return to activity. Unless you discover they are notoriously conservative, I'd take the advice of your surgeon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rule of thumb for most fractures is 4 to 8 weeks from the date of your surgery, depending on the bone's blood supply, and the severity of the break. The Fibula is one of the "best" bones to break, because it gets plenty of blood and is secondary to the Tibia as a supporter.

 

That being said, [no skiing syndrome] is thought to be a very serious and possibly life threatening condition. Research shows that it can lead to such massive cases of clinical depression that unintentional suicide becomes a real concern. Therefore you should ski NOW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year I broke my fibula skiing, but no surgery was required. I skied six weeks later, though clearly your fracture is more serious. Eric makes a good point about how after so much time on crutches, the muscles will have atrophied and offer little protection to your joints. I would take into account what your orthopedic surgeon says but make your own decisions based on what your body is telling you: if your legs feel strong and stable, start easing back into skiing. And don't give too much weight to what people on the internet tell you! Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey matey, check out the book at MEC called "Injuries in Outdoor Sports". Obviously pay attention to your Dr, but this might have some info specifically pertaining to you. Rehab exercises and the like. I know that sometimes dealing with a Dr they might be thinking more about golf than skiing....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the hardware still in the leg? 

I have a friend who had a similar situation and time line as you a couple years ago.  He mentioned the huge amount of damage that would happen to the bone if it broke in the same place with the plate still inside.  He was able to ice climb but there was pain in the general location the following winter. 

he had the hardware taken out a couple years after the accident.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×