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pup_on_the_mountain

Integral Designs eVENT Thru Hiker??

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Has any one been using it as your main shell? Hoe does it fare in cold conditions, especially with high winds? Wet snow? I currently have a TNF 3-layer GoreTex XCR jacket that is not working all that well any more. I'm looking to replace that jacket, and am considering the Thru Hiker. I'll be mostly using my jacket for ice and alpine climbing. Also, most eVENT wear seem much thinner and lighter than GoreTex, so how good is the ThruHiker (or for that matter, any eVENT jacket) when it comes to rough use (bushwhaking etc.)?

 

TIA. For reference, check out this link.

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Hoe does it fare in cold conditions, especially with high winds?

 

It's a shell, like your goretex piece. It contains no insulation, but is 100% waterproof and windproof.

 

 

Also, most eVENT wear seem much thinner and lighter than GoreTex, so how good is the ThruHiker (or for that matter, any eVENT jacket) when it comes to rough use (bushwhaking etc.)?

 

The material is "slicker" than traditional nylon-gore laminate shells, and feels much like a more durable version of sil-nylon. I think this makes it much less prone to snagging on brambles while bushwacking than most shells.

 

 

The material (eVent) is so breathable and light that Gore Tex will no longer "officially certify" companies that use it, because it blows their stuff out of the water. That's why you don't see Arctery'x, Mtn Hardware, etc using this stuff, they don't want to lose their Gore certification.

 

 

The "Thru-hiker" model is longer in the torso, while the "Rain Jacket" is more of a normal cut and meant to work over a climbing harness. If you are borderline, order one-size up.

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Thanks for the pointers Blake! I did goof up my question about the insulation part - what I wanted to ask was just about the windproofing. Although, my current shell is quite heavy, and it sucks so much in terms of breathability that it feels quite warm just to have it on for a while :noway: . Any ways, looks like the Thru Hiker is good for that aspect. I personally prefer wearing my harness over the jacket, so that I can access gear without having to push the jacket off the way.

 

I had a follow up question as well. Looks like the Thru Hiker has only one (chest) pocket. Do people find this a drawback? My current jacket has four big pockets, but its heavier because of that as well.

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I've used a lot of eVENT jackets over the past few years. The ID jacket (not thruhiker) is cut very narrow and tight. You can get a light fleece underneath, but anything puffy will get squashed. The hood won't fit over a helmet. It is one of my main hiking jackets and I've spent a lot of time in it. Durability is good, but the inside part of the lower back is beginning to wear out. I've climbed in it before, but never on anything with serious weather. You do need to wash it frequently. Weight is minimal (9 oz). Breathability is excellent.

 

I've also used LOKI's alpinist shell jacket, and like it a lot. I climbed a fair amount in it and it is more appropriate for alpine use. Fortunately, I got it on sale for about 40% off, which made it much more reasonable in price. The fabric seems thicker than the ID jacket. It is longer cut, with more room to layer underneath. The hood can mostly fit over a helmet, though it is a bit tight. There are built in mitts that I like and use a lot. There is also a built in face mask, which I also like a lot. Durability is great and the jacket came through a season of climbing, capped by three weeks in the Stikine (see TR in the BC section). No damage to jacket. Breathability is also excellent.

 

Lastly, there is a Rab eVENT jacket that I've just recently started using (I don't think you can buy it) and like alot. It has a full on helmet compatible hood and is cut for alpine activities. It weighs in a 16 oz and is a really sweet piece. I haven't spent enough time in it to say much more, but I suspect that it will be my main shell this spring time.

 

In short, eVENT works very well. Durability is superb and breathability is as advertised.

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I Have the ID jacket and it works quite well for backpacking. It does not seem too well cut for alpine climbing. Suge is right that its not too durable. It is also cut quite small. Im 6 ' and a large is just long enough in the arms and the torso that it fits. If I were looking for an alpine climbing jacket made from event i definitely would consider the RAB jackets, specifically the super dru.

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Don't forget to check out Wild Things 2 eVent jackets. Most everything they make is bomber and climber specific...

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Thanks for all the feedback guys. These jackets are quite pricey!! The local shop (Hyperspud) had a Montane Superfly eVent jacket in my size (previous model from what is given in the web page though). Going with the idea of supporting the local shop, and since John (at Hyperspud) cut me a deal ($250+tax), I bought it. Looks like it is designed more for climbing than the Thru Hiker (which I could try out at the same shop as well). Has four pockets, helmet-compatible hood, and runs as a low cut (wear harness over the jacket), and has space to have extra layers inside. The outer material is a 3-layer eVent ripstop, and felt slightly thicker than the material of the Thru Hiker. Hopefully, it'll take some rough use. John said Montane stopped selling stuff in the US a few months back, and were in the process of getting their permits reissued for the same. I'll come back after some use to report how the Superfly fares.

 

If not for this jacket, I was going to get the OR Mentor jacket from the capitalists (REI), which is on sale for $279 (plus extra $20 off with the holiday coupon). This is not an eVent jacket (GoreTex Pro or something), but was in my price range.

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I bought an ID Cruiser jacket (half price) to test the eVent breathability. I normally use a MH Backcountry Recon jacket, which I've been really happy with, but haven't climbed in it. I think it would work with a helmet, and the lower pockets clear a pack belt. Love this jacket, and since it's been discontinued, it's on clearance at a number of places. Standard 3-layer PTFE laminate like Gore-Tex.

 

I tested both on a trip up Mailbox Peak with a pack on. Steady wind and rain all day.

The ID jacket sucked for one simple reason. No underzips (pit zips). The Recon let me easily "vest" the jacket without taking anything off, and being able to put my arms outside the jacket was far more "breathable" than any material could ever be. Haven't worn out either one yet, but the Recon is pretty light (1 lb), and seems much more durable to me.

 

I also tested the Recon in measured winds of 50-60 mph (higher gusts) with a steady rain. Not a drop of water made it through. All the zippers are better protected on the Recon for conditions like this.

 

For "usability", I like things like hood cords that are always easy to find, usable with gloves, and don't whip in the face in high winds. Other things like a hood that closes high on the face if necessary, with a brim, allow for a full closure with just the eyes exposed, and that makes a big difference in severe conditions.

 

Just another opinion.

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integral_designs_thru_hiker_jacket_lg.jpg

 

There is alot of things wrong with the design of this jacket if you are planning to use it as a thru-hiker/all round use.

 

1) There is no belay zipper (which also serves as a good vent and allows you to do a poncho-mode for hot wet hikes)

 

2) The is absolutely NO neck and chin protection since the main zip ends right at the base of the neck. I had the same problem with my Patagonia Super Cell jacket and a few of the recent Patagonia models that went straight to eBay as a result. Wind and Rain get right in there and drip down you chest area. You can wear a neck scarf or heavy duty baclava to remedy this, but you are talking extra weight and perhaps spending more money for what could've been a 3 or 4 inches of extra zipper.

 

3) That hood looks weak and on the small side. (I think someone mentioned that)

 

4) In my experiences I don't like fabric material around the cuffs for the velcro catch. It tends to wear off DWR quicker that the other surfaces of your jacket and as a result will soak during a proper downpour giving you heavy, sagging cuffs that get water in your pockets when you put you hands in them. (My TNF Mountain Light gave me that drama). Alot of newer jackets like arcteryx ones remedy this by using rubber material on the velcro cuffs)

89019309_2e6d92f350.jpg

 

5) For $259 you are basically paying for the eVent and the fact that this item is only 11-12 ounces (when dry mind you) off the rack. Myopiion with ultra light shells like the Patagonia Supercell and the Arteryx Alpha SV is that when the temps get below 50 degrees (which is about 70% of the year where I live) and you are outside for a lentgh of time you will end up using the weight saved carrying extra layers and heavier fleece or insulation.

I've learned to go with a heavier duty rain shell (16-20 ozs)always and skim on the extra layers which add more weight to your pack. So unless a rain jacket is 25-40 oz weight is not a my buying factor when protection is more important to my overall experience of a good thru hike.

 

Good Luck buddy.

 

 

 

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One last comment.

 

It won't matter which breathable fabric you choose, if it saturates on the outer surface with water (flat wet look, instead of water beading up).

That's "wetting out", and once it happens no more breathing, no matter what the fancy material is underneath.

 

Rainy Pass recommends Grangers, but they are also OK with Nikwax.

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I agree about the wetting out. You might give the Revivex a try sometime too. It good, and also economical.

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