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Cobra_Commander

Tell me this isn't true - Jim Anglin

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This can't be real, i was there i heard nothing about it. C'mon please tell me this is not real.

 

JL

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If you click on the link above you will get this story:

 

Wa man dies after 100-foot fall at Smith Rock State Park

06:48 PM PST on Sunday, November 4, 2007

By ADRIANE HORNER, kgw.com Staff

A Washington man was killed Sunday morning while climbing with friends in Deshcutes County Oregon.

 

55-year-old Jim Anglin of White Salmon Washington lost his footing while climbing down a steep trail at Smith Rock State Park.

 

Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies arrived and determined that Anglin had died from the 100-foot fall.

 

Anglin’s friends told deputies that he was an experienced rock climber and was wearing climbing gear but was not wearing a helmet at the time of the fall.

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jlag's post was the only one visible when I clicked on the thread. This is surreal - I was just out with Jim the other day - you couldn't hope to meet a more competent and pleasant human than Jim.

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It looks like he was heading into the lower gorge on that steep trail based on the bit below. I've slipped there a few times myself, but never thought much of it. Terrible news.

 

By KATU Web Staff

Terrebonne, Ore. - An experienced rock climber lost his footing and fell to his death at Smith Rock State Park Sunday, authorities said.

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office identified the man as 55-year-old Jim Anglin of White Salmon, Wash.

 

According to the sheriff's office, Anglin was with two friends heading down into the gorge along a steep climbers trail at the southeast end of the park when he lost his footing and fell about 100 feet shortly before 10 a.m. Emergency crews responded and confirmed Anglin had died from the fall. They recovered his body from the bottom of the gorge, the sheriff's office said.

 

Anglin was not wearing a helmet at the time of the fall, the sheriff's office said.

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Jim will be sorely missed here and all over the West in all the places he's climbed so often. From our outing last week...

 

Jim_Anglin_iNet.jpg

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wow. sorry to all. it never really occured to me how dangerous that trail could be.

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Oh my god, this is just awful.

Jim made a special trip to hook me up with some old school gear last summer in Portland to help me out with some pickets adventures. Thanks so much for helping me out Jim, that was really really nice of you.

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Terrible news.

 

Ran into Jim last summer in The Menagerie; thanked him for all he'd done up there to develop it. We talked about climbing together but sadly that won't happen, now.

 

I wish his family and good friends the best in this difficult time.

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(the following adapted from Utah Philips writings)

Time is an enormous, long river, and I'm standing in it, just as you're standing in it, Jim was sanding in it. Our elders such as Jim are the tributaries, and everything they thought and every struggle they went through and everything they gave their lives to, and every route they created flows down to us - and if we take the time to ask, and if I take the time to see, and if I take the time to reach out and experience what he has left for us, we can build that bridge between our world and his. We can reach down into that river which he helped create and take out what we need to get through this world. Bridges from our time his time, and from his time to his elders time. And we all put into the river and we let it go and it flows away from us until it no longer has our name, our identity. It has its own utility and it's own use and people should take what they need and make it part of their lives. In this way, Jim didn't go anywhere, did he?

 

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Hey everybody, Jim was our neighbor, our climbing partner, and a great friend and mentor to me and my wife.

 

Jim passed the new route bug to both my wife and I. He started out by bolting lines for Kay to clean and redpoint, then taught us the ins and outs of bolting, and lent us his drill when ever we wanted!

 

Jim was tons of fun to climb with, always providing a great vibe and never complaining about the moss and choss.

 

We will miss you Jim.

 

Paul & Kay

 

ja1.jpg

 

ja2.jpg

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My favorite "Jim" story:

 

I was at smith (last fall I believe) and bumped into Jim and his partner... we were shooting the shit when some kid strolled up and was sizing up a route behind us... the kid interrupted us and asked if any of us had done it before.

 

Jim looked at him with a grin and a twinkle in his eye (if you know Jim you know the one I'm talking about) and said "Actually... I put it up" and strolled off. I checked the guidebook that evening and sure enough FA: Jim Anglin.

 

I still laugh every time I think it about it.

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Although I only met Jim once, I feel he was one of the nicest good natured people I've ever met. His routes are truly inspiring.

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Terrible news...so often accidents occur in places we'd least expect it.

 

Thoughts go out to Jim's family. Thank you for the inspiration and the pioneering spirit, Jim. You will be very sorely missed...

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JIm was one of the best climbers and one of the finest men i have ever met. My heart is broken in 10 million peices.

 

Peace to you jim and to his family.

Edited by Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer

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We have met Jim briefly and only once by Elephants Perch in ID where he generously offered us beta on some climb. I have also bothered him countless times for info. on some obscure adventure climbs here -- he was always willing to share his vast knowledge. He always struck me as a very humble & approachable guy. This is such a tragedy! His presence will be very much missed! Our thoughts & prayers go out to Jim's family.

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Never met him but obviously he had a profound effect on the climbing community and everyone he met and will be missed.

 

R.I.P.

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I never had a chance to climb with Jim, but over the years whenever I would run into him, Menagerie, East Caves, Flagstone, etc, the one thing for sure you would notice, he was smiling - Never heard a harsh word - He was at peace with himself - His many friends, including me, will miss him.

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