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CraigA

conspiracy????

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As I'm starting to put together a rack and I'm doing more rock climbing I've come across something that I find interesting: Most route description describe necessary gear in inches, yet when buying gear it comes in mm. [Confused]

 

Now I know the conversion so it really isn't a big deal, I'm just wondering why? Why don't the manufacturers call out in inches or why don't the authors call out in mm's? Then simple minded people like myself wouldn't have to do the math [Eek!] (less chance of me trying to place a 25mm stopper in a 2.5 inch crack! [laf]

 

Just a thought?

 

Guess I must be bored. [Roll Eyes][Roll Eyes]

 

Craig

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the thing that pisses me off is thatt with packs...the canucks use liters adn the yanks use C.U.'s whats the deal? does anyone knwo the conversion for that? [Confused]

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quote:

Originally posted by Fence Sitter:

the thing that pisses me off is thatt with packs...the canucks use liters adn the yanks use C.U.'s whats the deal? does anyone knwo the conversion for that?
[Confused]

try http://www.convert-me.com/en/

 

I reserve my brain for more important things [Cool]

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Well, I could probably write an article of why the imperial system sucks the royal HC compared to the SI/metric system. [Razz]

 

When reading trip reports and books such as Extreme Alpinism and comparing fuel consumption etc I have come across a small problem. Just how much is for example 22 oz in litres? Taking a look at a Nalgene bottle suggests approx 650 ml of water. Now how about white gas (with a different density)? Glancing at a MSR bottle 22 "fill oz" again suggests 650 ml.

 

Is "oz" compared to "ml" always related to water when measuring volumes or what? [Confused]

 

And how much is a "quart"? A quarter gallon?

In that case, British or US gallon...?

 

[ 10-14-2002, 05:19 AM: Message edited by: Swedish Chef ]

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Ah, the Imperial System. There are fluid ounces and ounces as a measure of weight. The ounces on a Nalgene bottle and MSR fuel bottle are both fluid ounces, so you don't have to worry about density.

 

A quart is a quarter gallon, a little more than a liter.

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It's all pretty confusing:

Ounces are measurement of mass (weight)

Milliliters are measurement of volume.

White gas and water have different densities (mass per unit of volume.)

22 ounces of each will have slightly different amounts of volume.

650 milliliters of each will have different amounts of mass.

But, 650 ml of water is equal to 650ml of white gas.

22 ounces of water is equal to 22 ounces of white gas.

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quote:

Originally posted by tread tramp:

A pint of Guiness equals 16 fluid ounces. From that point it is just a matter of simple calculations.
[big Drink]

Go to England or Ireland and a pint of the dark stuff will equal 20 oz. [big Drink]

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quote:

Originally posted by Paco:

quote:

Originally posted by tread tramp:

A pint of Guiness equals 16 fluid ounces. From that point it is just a matter of simple calculations.
[big Drink]

Go to England or Ireland and a pint of the dark stuff will equal 20 oz.
[big Drink]
Or the Brew Pub in Squampton. They have Real Pints too.

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squampton?!?! compare with the black in the UK? as much as i lovethat place and consequently its beer...i'm gonna have to disagree with ya...you gotta try the euro porters and just straight up draught guiness and see waht i mean... [big Drink] its a beautiful thing [big Grin]

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quote:

Originally posted by Fence Sitter:

squampton?!?! compare with the black in the UK? as much as i lovethat place and consequently its beer...i'm gonna have to disagree with ya...you gotta try the euro porters and just straight up draught guiness and see waht i mean...
[big Drink]
its a beautiful thing
[big Grin]

Uh oh, thread drift!

Oh, I know what you mean. I actually think the BP beer is not that great except for a few select brews, try the Rye Ale... [big Drink] But they are 20oz pints, and that is what we are trying to talk about here.

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the extra 3 grams are those consumed by buyer and seller to ascertain potency. [big Grin]

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quote:

Originally posted by Dru:

the extra 3 grams are those consumed by buyer and seller to ascertain potency.
[big Grin]

and lets not forget about the "fudge factor". AKA: "Ah, close enough!"

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