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Jonathan

What have you done with duct tape lately?

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Here's a question. I used duct tape to cover up tears in my jacket. I finally have a second jacket and want to send off the old one for repair to patagonia, but after removing the duct tape, there's a bunch of sticky stuff left behind. How do I get rid of this stuff?

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Seam grip is good. I've fixed several small holes on my I-tent with the stuff. Very flexible.

 

A word about crazy glue. Never leave home w/o a small tube. I once helped a buddy glue the sole back on his boot near Ouzel Lake. Might have been a long hop down Depot Creek.

 

Zip ties are handy as well, esp. for snowshoe repair

 

Jonathan Pryce

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

Here's a question. I used duct tape to cover up tears in my jacket. I finally have a second jacket and want to send off the old one for repair to patagonia, but after removing the duct tape, there's a bunch of sticky stuff left behind. How do I get rid of this stuff?

That's a tough one. Seems that most things that dissolve adhesive have a similarly detrimental effect on synthetics. You might try nail polish remover, although you should be hella way careful with it. Maybe test a little bit of it at the edge of the hole in your jacket and see if it buggers up the fabric or the laminate. If not, go to town! Otherwise, white gas would also do the trick, but again, no telling what it might do to the jacket, and you also have a petroleum-scented garment to deal with.

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Sticky duct tape remnants, eh? Dunno. As has been pointed out, substances like white gas, nail polish remover and marmot bile might prove hazardous the fabric's health. If the patches are to be glued on, there may be some kind of sticky duct tape patina-repair adhesive conflict. Assuming, however, the patches will be sewn on, my inner dirt bag says "Simply ignore."

 

In any case, Patagucci will doubtlessly have dealt with this situation before and will likely be able to offer a really cool, but costly solution.

 

Jonathan Pryce

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quote:

Originally posted by Dr Flash Amazing:

There's some cat in Portland who makes duct tape wallets. The Doctor has seen them for sale here and there. Seems kind of sketchy, though, having that shit be all peeling apart and sticking to your pants and your money, gumming up your credit cards. They look pretty cool, though.

(snip)

-

And here's how it's done...

 

[ 09-06-2002, 01:12 PM: Message edited by: ScottP ]

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I had a student in Alaska that made her graduation dress out of duct tape. She was not the most popular person with administration but I thought she did a wonderful job both in creativity and in making a statement for all the kids who are not financially able to spend tons of money on outfits for the prom, graduation, homecoming etc.

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Yet another use--removing warts!

 

http://www.komotv.com/stories/20806.htm

 

Text of link below:

 

CHICAGO - You've probably heard how duct tape is so versatile it can be used to fix most anything? Now, you might consider adding a roll to your medicine cabinet in case you ever develop a wart.

 

Researchers at Madigan Army Medical Center near Tacoma found that the over-the-hardware-counter duct tape is a more effective, less painful alternative to liquid nitrogen, which is used to freeze warts.

 

The study was reported in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

 

In the study, patients wore duct tape over their warts for six days. Then they removed the tape, soaked the area in water and used an emery board or pumice stone to scrape the spot. The tape was reapplied the next morning. The treatment continued for a maximum of two months or until the wart went away.

 

The duct tape irritated the warts, and that apparently caused an immune system reaction that attacked the growths, said researcher Dr. Dean "Rick" Focht III of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

 

He said researchers did not test other kinds of tape, and so they cannot say whether there is anything special about the gray, heavy-duty, fabric-backed tape.

 

Pediatric dermatologist Dr. Anthony J. Mancini of Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago said he uses a form of duct-tape therapy for warts. He combines duct tape with a topical, over-the-counter wart remover for nightly treatments.

 

"The whole point of this is a non-painful approach," said Mancini, who was not involved in the study.

 

The study at Madigan began with 61 patients between the ages of 3 and 22, but only 51 patients completed the study.

 

Of the 26 patients treated with duct tape, 85 percent got rid of their warts compared with 60 percent of the 25 patients who received the freezing treatment.

 

Researchers did not test the duct tape on older adults and also did not study whether warts recurred.

 

The apparent curative powers of duct tape are no surprise to Tim Nyberg, one-half of the Duct Tape Guys, who write books and perform comedy about the adhesive's allure. Nyberg said he and his duct tape partner, Jim Berg, do a shtick that includes duct tape wart removal.

 

"It's the universal panacea," Nyberg said.

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More late breaking duct tape usefulness info . . .

 

Got a menstrating Chihuahua? Duct tape and an old dish cloth to the rescue!

 

Jonathan

427559-Windeln01.jpg.1bffa9aceff7cf7564afe0a194243617.jpg

Edited by Jonathan

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Here's a question. I used duct tape to cover up tears in my jacket. I finally have a second jacket and want to send off the old one for repair to patagonia, but after removing the duct tape, there's a bunch of sticky stuff left behind. How do I get rid of this stuff?

 

You can use a product called Uni-Solve. It is used to remove tape residue from skin, but I have found it works great on fabrics. And it has an orange scent. But...there is a chance that your clothes could get ruined or your head could explode......just my disclaimer. (It really works well though). The only problem will be finding it. I work with the stuff daily ...so.....I got that going for me.

You could also try peeing on the spot. It really wont do anything, but if you get frustrated it may make you feel better.

good luck.

bigdrink.gif

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used it to cover a hole in the seam of my gloves. sent the glove back to the manufacturer (Mountain Hardwear) with the tape on.

use it to cut purssik cords from longer rope. tape it where you want to cut it and then cut in the middle. that way there is no fraying of the sheath.

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Last shopping at Costco I picked bottle for water cooler.

At home we realized that is leaking.

There was small hole I duct taped, instead of taking bootle back.

smile.gif

Edited by Zoran

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i had a pretty tele skier girl come into my lodge today needing some of the silver miracle for her beat up T1'S...it was fun running around with cutie trying to find my roll... then she just wrapped the shit out of her upper boot, and flashed a big grin.gif gave me a little blu-eyed wink.gif and was off to go rip...maybe she'll be back for some bigdrink.gifthumbs_up.gif

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Using the POS foam pad from a Salomon adventure backpack, I made an amazing sit-pad/splint/cutting board.

 

I had access to a lot of duct tape, and was bored, so...I started to shingle one side, so when I would sit on the foam pad, it would get dirty and wouldn't tear.

 

Then I thought "Hey, wtf, why not duct tape the whole thing?".

 

SO being prudent, I put minimal tape at the crease so it would still fold. About 7 layers later I was done.

I usually keep it in my daypack.

You unfold it, lean it against a tree and you have a backrest AND sit pad.

 

Use it as a sitpad in winter to keep your ass dry.

 

Use it as a cutting/prep board when making sandwhiches etc.

 

Emergency bivy pad.

 

My new "Duct-pad" is waterproof and does a lot of different things. It's really useful and improves the life of

cheap blue foam and/or Evazote.

 

Why WOULDN'T you add 1 layer to keep your expensive evazote pad from ripping??

 

smile.gif

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yeah, like the above post says

don't get those plantar's warts carved outta yer foot. a duct tape patch, changed daily, and warts magically disappear!

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