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IceScrewed

Your favorite carry-over pack

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Best packs for alpine climbing: (layback moves, piolet traction, range of motion, no bells and whistles to hang up in chimneys, well balnanced, etc.)

 

millet

lafuma

wildcountry (do they still make em'?)

 

worst packs for alpnie climbing.

Mountainsmith

Dana Design

Gregory

Osprey

Climb some steep rock and swing some tools and you'll agree.

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I have a Karrimor Alpiniste 45+10 for sale. It has a very narrow profile and is really stable - Karrimor is British and the pack is primarily targeted at Scottish ice climbers.

 

The 45+10 means the pack has a capacity of 45 liters and can be stuffed to 55, or something like that. I think it isn't quite that big actually.

 

I'm going to sell it because it is an inch or two too short for my back, which makes me miserable on the trail when the pack is loaded up with rope, rack, bivi gear etc.

 

It has dual ice axe loops with old-style straps (not tubes/holsters like some packs), two daisy chains, two compression straps on each side, ski retention straps at the bottom, wand pockets, crampon straps on the lid pocket, gear loops on the hip belt, inside shovel and probe pockets, an extension thingy that makes the pack more useful for stuffing your legs into in case of an emergency bivi, and a framesheet compartment that I always stuff my 3/4 length thin thermarest into. I still have the original framesheet.

 

I can bring it to pub club if somebody is interested. I'm ca. 5'9" and my back is rather long - you only want this pack if your back is shorter than mine as the distance between the shoulder straps and the hip belt is not adjustable.

 

Karrimor is at http://www.karrimor.co.uk/ but has one of those stupid flash sites. They seem to have done a color revision on the pack but the only functional change I can see is that they went to ice axe fabric tubes and removed the crampon straps on the top.

 

[ 08-31-2002, 07:41 PM: Message edited by: Idea Guy ]

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Oops... Idea Guy came over for a visit, spent some time on cc.com, and then I didn't notice that he was stilled logged on to the board when I wrote the pack-for-sale post above... [hell no]

 

Anyway, if you're interested in the pack PM me, not Idea Guy.

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quote:

Originally posted by carolyn:

has anyone ever used wildthings Andinista? Thoughts?

Have a love-hate relationship w/ this one.

 

Bad - Way too expensive. They save weight by using dinky zippers that can't be opened w/ gloves and that break frequently. one strap ripped out the stiching, don't have time to send it back as I use it all the time. When zipped up on the sides, loaded pack bangs on helmet when you try to look up routes. Pack straps have basically no padding, so expect welts when carrying heavy stuff (though that was not the intention of the design).

 

Good - It's a shapeshifter. I can take it on one-day trips or many-day trips. Very light, very functional. Carries skis well. I like the crampon holder on the back (just two straps). Nice pad in the back for sitting, etc. Could bivy in it if you had to, but one miserable experience. Nice gear loops on the hip belt. Pack looks hilarious when fully-loaded.

 

If I got a Wild Things pack again it would be the smaller ice sack.

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quote:

Originally posted by mattp:

Note: When people lash their ice axe on their pack, using the little loop on the bottom and having the shaft point upward, I HAVE seen the spike poke things and people. But everyone considers the ice axe loop essential.

I did almost slash my wrist once with the adze of my axe while it was on my pack, but no sheathe. Just a little fall in the wet talus on the way in via Mountaineer Creek to the N. side of Stuart. That was just a little while after another member of our party fell down straddling a high log when the slimy bark separated from the log. I believe that was the last time we ever thought getting stoned made hiking easier...

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Thanks for the practical info iain!

Someone was trying to convince me of this pack recently. It looks and sounds great, however I hate to blindly order something...I dont know anyone who owns one and can show me what it looks like in person (except for the individual who bought theirs in like '88).

 

Cost isnt TOO much of an issue while I can still prodeal schtuff. [smile]

 

Zippers are on warranty, yes? If I went with the pack, maybe i could replace the zippers immediately (the store I work at does repairs).

 

What year did you get yours? My understanding is there have been some changes....like the fabric being "waterproof" (even though we know nothing is truley waterPROOF).

 

The ice sac looks nice too.

 

Ive recently gotten word that I might be able to demo some granite gear packs (current and/or upcoming designs). So, I may wind up leaning in that direction instead.

 

Thanks again for the info!

 

carolyn

 

[ 09-04-2002, 09:52 PM: Message edited by: carolyn ]

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Here's the one I have, I think the new ones are yellowish:

 

-

 

I bought mine in 2000 I believe. Can't say much for the waterproofing, everything gets wet (they may have made this better in future models).

 

I like mine a lot, but it definitely gives the nod to function over comfort.

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I've been using the Lowe Alpine Attack 50 for 4 years and love it. It's 3100 cu. in., has a built-in crampon pouch, gear slings, hydration pocket, bivy pad, not too heavy. It's very functional without too many extras. It has two strong loops at the hip that can be used for tool holsters or better, clipping cams or other heavy pro to. Fits my 15 deg sleeping bag so it's my most used pack. Recommend it.

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[sNAFFLEHOUND]

Some good info here. I have a Marmot CrossTerra or something like that--3500ci, some neat attachment point/compression system things on front, which is why I bought it, but otherwise it SUCKS! Issues--can't bivy because extension collar is way too short, frame sucks, is stiff, bad for climbing, kind of heavy, no built-in bivy pad.

 

SO...sound like the IceSac, Lowe Alpine Attack, CCW Chernobyl are the best from reading this thread and flipping to their websites. But a few q's remain: can you attack a full-size pad to these when needed, how are they for sleeping in?

 

Appreciate it.

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If you're a true X-treme alpinist you'll choose the Andinista:

 

"The Andinista expresses the Light is Right ideal better than any other product. It's the most versatile pack for the weight that exists; use it to carry the bulky gear to the base and then compress it down for the route. I used it during an alpine style attempt on Nanga Parbat's massive Rupal Face and on Denali's Czech Direct. I've had an Andinista in my gear arsenal since 1987."

-Mark Twight [big Grin][Wink]

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quote:

Originally posted by dbconlin:

[sNAFFLEHOUND]
.... can you attack a full-size pad to these when needed, how are they for sleeping in?

 

Appreciate it.

Based on experiments I have observed and first hand research, First ambush, then stomp on the pad with crampons would be the best way to attack the viscous full sized pad, the smaller 3/4 pads can be disposed of any number of ways, burn them with your stove, leave them at the trail head, bushwack with it on the outside of the pack, etc.

 

Try to sleep in your pack in the back yard and you'll see how this is a last resort measure.

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dbconlin .... speaking as a CCW Chernobyl owner, attaching a full size pad is no problem. The pack has 4 daisys which provide plenty of options. I usually carry my pad oriented vertically to keep a narrow profile. One can also stuff a pad under the extendable lid.

As far as sleeping in it, works just fine for me, done it many times. I am 6' and the bivi skirt hits me right about the waist when not wearing my boots. Used with a hip length parka your good, or should I say as good as you can get with a setup like this.

I have one of the older style units which has trad tool loops instead of tubes and a different compression system which has since been improved. The pad that came with my unit is very narrow and folds our lengthwise. I think the Alpine Attack tri-fold pad is more functional but hey, "that which does not kill me only makes me stronger" right?

Durability has been super. Mine has been dropped, kicked, hauled and drowned ... still going strong with only a couple small holes after about 10 years. For what it was designed for I have few complaints although a higher density foam in the shoulder straps would be a good place to start.

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So here is my round up on the New Icesac I have a 1996 model which I ABSOLUTELY LOVE!!!

BTW they Just sold Wildthings again….watch out for changes…they already drop the runners and harness production only making packs and clothing's…also I heard they really targeting the market towards Japan….So by-by local climbers market we no more cater to your needs

 

BTW $350 for the Andinista....Kids just say NO TO DRUGS!!!

but on second thought...they will get it from the Japanese market

[big Drink]

 

[ 09-19-2002, 10:26 AM: Message edited by: IceIceBaby ]

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How about the Serratus Genie ($32 US and ~14 oz.) for summer and the Golite Gust ($100 and 18 oz.) for winter and Alaska.

The Genie even worked well for a 5-day southern Pickets trip!

 

Mark

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quote:

Originally posted by Marko:

How about the Serratus Genie ($32 US and ~14 oz.) for summer

and winter and all the time. Genie rocks! Doesn't carry skiis too good though. OK across the top, under lid for bootpacking. but stay away from the bush.

 

Freesole/Seam Grip the bottom seam though, or it'll wear through qiuck.

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Hands down my Mchale Alpineer pack has been the best pack I have owned. Yes it was a little spendy and a little heavy but it is the most comfortable pack to carry a load. I have used it on trips ranging from the Wonderland Trail to Mt Adams.

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quote:

Originally posted by AARON1:

my Mchale ... pack has been the best pack I have owned...the most comfortable pack to carry a load.

Agreed. If carrying any significant amount of gear, I just about ALWAYS opt for my McHale even though I have a lighter and smaller pack that I sometimes use for day trips or alpine climbs.

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Mentions of McHale packs for "carrying" weight like the Alpineer or SARC and something us for lightpacking motivates this post.

 

I have two McHale packs. One is a 55 liter (same as the Icesac) Zero Sarc, sort of in the "Sub Pop" design. See this page:

 

http://www.mchalepacks.com/ultralight/detail/sub_pop.htm

 

and scroll down. The red pack is mine (the actual pack). With the packbag, two 7075 stays, 12mm bivy pad, top pocket, wide padded belt (exchangeable with a web belt if you prefer), and wand pockets, it weighs 51 ounces and carries weight infinitely better than my Ice Sac ever did. I recently took this pack on a Rainier climb and carried 53 pounds on the approach without a problem, then stripped it down to a 36 ounce rucksack (still with frame and belt) for the climb. Don't negate the usefulness of a frame even for so-called "light" (20+ lb) loads. The problem with impotent frameless rucksacks is that you get a bit of load shifting (even when you pack it right and rigid) which requires energy, which adds up over the long haul, and they really suck when climbing because it's impossible to properly stabilize a sub-capacity load, the shoulders bear the weight, and your overhead tool swinging goes to pot.

 

I also have a McHale Summit Pack. See

 

http://www.mchalepacks.com/ultralight/detail/summit_pack.htm

 

But that is not my pack. Mine is a bit different.

 

I had it customized from their standard summit pack with lightly padded shoulder straps and spec'd a volume of 45L. It has two really thin 7075 aluminum stays, 12mm bivy pad, top pocket, and 2" web belt, it weighs 36 ounces. It carries 30-35 pounds remarkably well, and again, makes the Ice Sac and its Viagra-starved frameless cousins pale in comparison.

 

Both packs have 420/840d heavy nylon bottoms with 210d spectra ripstop bodies.

 

I've done the frameless pack thing and I'm over it. In the past 10 years, I've climbed with the Lowe Alpine Attack 50, Wild Things Ice Sac, Andinista, Khamsin 38, GoLite Gust, and the CCW Chernobyl. But then you fork out the bucks and get a customized McHale and realize that the cash you've been dropping on crappy packs through the years could've paid for a trip to Alaska and a case of Mt Rainier Paradise Inn Cabernet-Merlot.

 

Above all, the McHale sarc-style packs (like these) climb superbly well. They have a narrow profile and are short (great headroom). I've climbed steep ice (double-tooling & swinging overhead) in mine with a full load and couldn't have been happier.

 

My two cents. But save yourself two hundred more dollars and read it again.

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What about the arc'teryx Khamsin 62? If only got the editors' choice pick in Climbing magazine. Any thoughts? or are you guys too busy pounding the chests of YOUR packs? [Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][big Grin]

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quote:

Originally posted by gym rat:

What about the arc'teryx Khamsin 62? If only got the editors' choice pick in Climbing magazine. Any thoughts? or are you guys too busy pounding the chests of YOUR packs?
[Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][Mad][big Grin]

When someone is asked their opinion they either 1)spray b.s. about something they haven't experienced, 2) regurgitate what they've heard/read from others 3)or speak from personal experience.

 

"Climbing" has given it the editors choice - they've spoken. So what do YOU think? My experience is with the Arcteryx Bora 60, which I've been extremely pleased with - well built, has the features I'm looking for, fits my body.

 

Does the K62 have the features you're looking for? Does it fit your body?? Who cares what I say if it doesn't fit your needed? [Eek!]

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Thanks Russ, you're right on. The K62 is rather big (4300 ci), and rather heavy at 4lb. I made some modifications, cutting off the lid's hip belt, and trimming the hip belt webbing. The suspension rides well, with the shoulder straps being extremely comfortable. I tend to have problems with hipbelts digging into my hipbones, but the squashpods work very well at preventing it. The thing is too big for day trips, as all the gear settles into the bottom and shifts the center of mass away from my body. Unnecessary features include: convertible lid, the hip belt webbing is too long by about a foot on either side, the crampon patch is way too big and heavy-I plan to cut it off even though it will make the bag look less cool, and when the pack is overstuffed, the shoulder strap lifter straps cannot be accessed. Also, I would prefer releasing buckles for all the compression straps, not just two of them. Also, the crampon patch has a drain hole in the bottom, as it isn't sewn on along the top, but this means the larger debris gets inside and is too big to come out of the drain hole. A few things puzzle me. Why are the axe loops removeable, when they weigh 1/2 ounce together, while heavy things like the crampon patch are not removeable? Seems silly to me. When loaded, the pack rides well, the cutout of the frame allows good head movement, and the entire thing rides very well. Also, the frame is very easily removeable, which is a bonus. The bottom line-although somewhat overbuilt, this is a very nice medium-large pack with excellent workmanship, materials, and suspension. After some lightening modifications it is a nearly perfect pack. For day trips, sew a frameless pack for $30-mine carries smaller loads better, and is more convenient and lighter than the Arc'teryx. For larger loads and longer trips, the K62 is excellent.

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