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jared_j

Lightweight boot alternatives for alpine?

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I'm looking for crampon-compatible boots that are lightweight (so that I can carry them over) to be used alpine climbs that are primarily rock in nature, but require glacier crossing on the approach (e.g. Bugs). If I believe the outdoor industry marketing hype, the La Sportiva Trango S EVO GTX is the boot for me. Tried it on, fit OK, but it is spendy.

 

1. Is it durable?

 

2. Any alternative suggestions that are less than 4 lbs?

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I have trango S and they are great. Scarpa has a similar offering as well as madrock...

 

 

 

but...for the bugs....aluminum strap-on poons and some light approach shoes are the way to go

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Would the Tango S work for Rainier and Shasta type climbs? I'm a true beginner who just got back from Rainier and the very heavy plastic boots I rented were killers for me. I'd love to be able to get away with a much lighter and more comfortable leather/gortex version. How about the Raichle All-Degree Lite GTX? Anybody used those?

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Would the Tango S work for Rainier and Shasta type climbs? I'm a true beginner who just got back from Rainier and the very heavy plastic boots I rented were killers for me. I'd love to be able to get away with a much lighter and more comfortable leather/gortex version. How about the Raichle All-Degree Lite GTX? Anybody used those?

 

Based on my personal experience, I didn't find the Trangos particularly warm. I think you might get cold feet on Rainier, but everybody's thermostat is different. They're made to be light weight and nimble on rock. Also, they have a fair bit of ankle flex to make them good for rock climbing. I found this killed my feet/ankles when traversing/front-pointing hard snow for an extended period of time.

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2. Any alternative suggestions that are less than 4 lbs?

I've been very happy with my Garmont Ferratas. Sadly, they are no longer available. When the time comes I'll probably replace them with the Garmont Vetta Plus.

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I've had both versions of the Trango S and they rock! They are light, climb mid 5th class rock well, and work fine for easy glacier climbing (I've taken them up Ranier in summer conditions, glacier approach on Forbidden, etc) They aren't real durable, but seem worth the money for 2-3 seasons of use.

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2. Any alternative suggestions that are less than 4 lbs?

I've been very happy with my Garmont Ferratas. Sadly, they are no longer available. When the time comes I'll probably replace them with the Garmont Vetta Plus.

 

I agree here. Note that a) this boot is for narrow feet, b) it does not have a front ledge for step in crampons, and c) it is completely non-insulated, but if all that's cool its a great summer climbing boot, particularly for the kind of rock routes the asker described, and its fine for hiking.

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I swapped out Garmont Towers for the Trangos after a couple trips in the Trangos...a little more rand for stiffnes and shock absorbsion, a little more ankle support, fit my beet better (wider), and a little warmer, and of course a little heavier.

 

I think the trangos are great boots, but they killed my toes...very narrow in the toe box. Bottom line is they can be the best boots in the world, but if they don't fit your feet, It won't matter.

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I had the original Trango's (green, all leather) and loved 'em. I'll sacrifice a little big of weight to have at least the bottom 2/3rds of the boot made out of leather. I have the Scarpa Triolets now and love them. The Towers are a similar boot, but are too narrow for my feet. Another good boot to look at is the Kayland Apex.

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Outside Magazine just gave a positive review for Salomon's Proton Mid GTX. They seem pretty light for a mountaineering boot, but they have them listed as a good peak-bagger. Any users among you?

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