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jackthenewb

what can i do solo

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can i go on smaller mountains, or if i head into the cascades do i absolutley have to have someone with me? I am not going to climb denali or anything but would like to go up to the ak range.

I am not going to be climbing rock faces but I will be pretty much backpacking but with ice axes and crampons.

thanks

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north of highway 20, and also anywhere east of a line drawn between diablo dam and stevens pass, the buddy system applies.

also, you are not allowed on smaller mountains after 10PM. you may however stay out later on the big chubby ones.

 

there is plenty of scrambling/climbing for all ability levels that you can do solo in the cascades on big and small mountains alike.

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Depends on the mountain and your experience level. Since you are just starting out I'd recommend teaming up with someone on early trips...or go on mellow dayhikes as you figure out what your limits are.

 

Backpacking solo is fine for anyone who knows how to navigate, knows their physical limits, travels prepared for the conditions, recognizes the added risk if injured, and accepts the responsibility of self-rescue if necessary.

 

You mention crampons and axe. I would not recommend going on trips requiring these until you are more experienced. Glacier travel solo is not advised (although is done) for experienced climbers and is definitely a no-go for a newbie without technical know-how or knowledge of the area. Leave the tools at home so you aren't tempted to go places you shouldn't.

 

That said, there are plenty of hikes and summits you can solo safely - especially after gaining some experience. Backpacking into the middle of nowhere alone can be incredibly rewarding and enjoyable. Just be prepared and don't be stupid.

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thanks for the advice and I am not planning on doing this anytime soon so don't worry. I also have plenty of backpacking experience just not in snowy mountains. so after some experience would i be able to go solo in the alaska range or with someone that has about the same experience level? I also would like to be on icy and snowy mountains so if this may make things different.

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Again - it all depends on the summit and your experience...regardless of whether it's in AK or elsewhere. Less technical, non-glacial climbs would be fine solo. Even some routes on bigger mountains are solo-able. But by the time you are to the point of considering those summits as legitimate goals, you will (hopefully) have gained the experience and good judgement to make those decisions for yourself.

 

As a rule, solo climbs on bigger mountains (i.e glaciers, ice, high altitude) are not something you should consider for a very long time. Teams rope up on them for a reason. If your question is, "is it possible to solo big mountains" then yes - it's done by climbers with years of experience.

 

Start small...this is a question you'll answer for yourself as you gain experience.

Edited by jfs1978

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The answer to this question is, of course, that you can do anything solo. Just use your own best judgement and try to take care of yourself.

 

This needs to be a 'sticky' or something...

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my first solo was the prow on wahington column in yosemite, i took my time and summited. good times and a great memory.

 

 

have fun, otherwise a waste of time.

 

 

cj sucks balls. :wave:

Edited by pink

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I have soloed many mountains that required ice axe and crampons. Don't leave them behind, but do learn how to use them. Glaciers are not advisable solo.

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Mt. Stuart via the Cacadian Couloir or the next notch to the east on the South side. Mt. Hood via the Old Chute. Granite Mountain is great for training, just pick an appropriate route based on the avalanche conditions. Depending on snowpack St. Helens is good until mid June ish? While Adams is good into early July. If you go to either late in the summer, be prepared to scale a scorching heap of desolate shit.

 

 

Anyhow, pick routes appropriate for your skill level, if you see something and your testicals ascend back into your abdomen, you might want to consider passing.

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I have soloed many mountains that required ice axe and crampons.

Listening to this guy will get you killed quicker than snot...

 

Don't leave them behind, but do learn how to use them. Glaciers are not advisable solo.

...and this is the first intelligent thing I've ever seen him write.

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can i go on smaller mountains, or if i head into the cascades do i absolutley have to have someone with me? I am not going to climb denali or anything but would like to go up to the ak range.

I am not going to be climbing rock faces but I will be pretty much backpacking but with ice axes and crampons.

thanks

 

Come on man. I think if you are asking this question to a bunch of unknown people then I would suggest you might not want to go solo. As far as I am concerned you should be the only one that should call whether or not to go solo. There are some people out there that probably should not hike Mt. Si on their own, how does anybody on here know if you are one of those persons.

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You can solo anything.

 

How dear is your life to you?

 

Do you rationalize everything, or do you balance your rationales (and quell the resultant fear) with an irrational faith.

 

There's great benefit in learning to still your mind long enough to hear what your gut tells you.

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

....and 10 essentials.

 

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

....and 10 essentials.

 

...which includes a section of aluminum ladder.

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studied have shown, Av dogs dig out those who employ the art of packing un wrapped beef jerky in thier breast pocket. so bring sum of that too.

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

....and 10 essentials.

Beer comes in 10 packs now?

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

....and 10 essentials.

Beer comes in 10 packs now?

It does if I'm the grocery boy packing your purchases... :brew: :brew::eveeel:

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I would advise bringing a GPS, an avalanche dog, a Personal Locator Beacon, cell phone, an avalanche beacon, an avalung, avalanche balloon, and a taun-taun.

 

I would also leave a trail of bread crumbs along the way...

 

....and 10 essentials.

 

...which includes a section of aluminum ladder.

 

Strapped to your back sideways a la V. Tejas?

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