Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
bstach

What do you cook in the mountians?

Recommended Posts

Kind of like how a 2 would improve your avatar?

Cooking shmooking , bring nothing and suffer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to boil powerbars, once they a paste consistency in the little mylar bag they can be spread on a pita or other base. The water can be used for cocoa! Nice efficient and damn tasty!

Kind of reminiscent of Salsbury steak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pasta, basil pesto, parmesan. A few fresh veggies (peppers, broccoli) are awesome if you want to carry the extra weight. :)

 

great idea!

 

I always carry a few roma tomatos, cucumbers & ranch dressing. Very nice after the approach hike with a cup of coffee.

 

:yoda:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife's Oatmeal Chocolate chip cookies,mmmmmm

I also do the bobali pizzas piled high, little extra weight but well worth it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Idahoan "Loaded" Potato flakes (sold in a pouch) and tuna (from a pouch). Serve with a few tortillas. You'll be bursting for only a few dollars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spaghetti sauce leather made in Harvest Maid food dryer. Make the sauce. Line food dryer tray with wax paper -spray lightly with oil. Spread sauce on wax paper and dry to a sheet like food leather. Fold the sauce leather and place it in a Ziploc bag. Label and store in freezer until ready to go. In camp in the morning, fill the Ziploc bag with water and leave it to soak all day. That night, boil the pasta, drain, and pour the sauce over it. Fresh grated parm cheese. The warm pasta is enough heat to warm up the sauce. Enjoy with freeze dried merlot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the idea of melting powerbars and spreading them on bagels, I will have to try that. I personally subscribe to eating whatever is the easiest and lightest I can come up with. If I am not melting snow then I am not carrying a stove, and eat cold. If carrying a stove I don't like to have to heat the water beyond warm, cook much. Powdered potatos and bagels are great "expander technology" to enhance/enlarge any meal. Back when I drank coffee, I put "coffee bags" in a cup of cold water over night and had "moon coffee" in the morning. Sucked, but beat carrying a stove. Fast, light, and cheap calories is the trick.

 

Edit: "I like my calories like I like my women; fast, light and cheap."

Edited by high_on_rock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amphetamines and lots of GU. Also, Mountain House Turkey Tetrazinni w/ instant potatoes mixed in. ALWAYS add plenty of water to freeze dried food bags. Once, I was low on water but hungry as hell, the result was semi-hydrated, very crunchy MH Beef Stew and I couldn't take a dump for about a week afterwards. It wasn't funny. Don't laugh.

 

Can you really eat marmots? What about those little chipmunks? People wearing shorts over poly?

 

I'm more curious about what others drink in the mtns. I like Crater Lake vodka w/ a sports drink mix. Mmmmmm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When we remember, the nalgene flask with some gentleman jack or johnny walker red.

 

Usually the mountain house or backcountry pantry, then we add angel hair pasta to it - adds the calories the 6'4" boyfriend needs.

 

Screw salt and pepper - chipotle tobasco sauce is the topper for everything. Tang as a nice change from water. I can't do Cliff Bars but old school power bars and gu work. i'll have to try the melted power bar. And dark chocolate Swiss Mix was perfect on our last snow outing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When we remember, the nalgene flask with some gentleman jack or johnny walker red.

 

:sick:

 

at least bring something decent... a higher end blended or a low-end single malt...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This all sounds very gourmet and yummy! (Can I climb with you guys from now on??) I''ll be the first to admit it though, I am a Top Ramen kinda gal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Used to always take a Casa Que Pasa potato burrito for one-nighters, but alas . . .

 

Casa Que Pasa is back in B-town!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good point made above is that the fortunate folks here who are out most every weekend may well eat diffetntly than those of us who make just a few overnights a summer. Out every weekend: make your own dinners. Out on 3-4 overnights per year - typically better to buy some freeze dried chow. (I still have a long-ago purchased box of dried milk in the freezer that I am sure will never get used!)

 

Snack favorites: good olives in a 4 oz nalgene bottle, and add olive oil to cook with.

Pecorino Romano cheese - salty, handles hot weather well.

Tamari almonds

choco covered coffee beans on cold climbs

Spiz power drink, if it's going to be a real long day

http://www.spiz.net/

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really a picky eater and am a fan of Idahoan potatoes because you can cook them in their own package just like the fancy freeze dried foods; throw a little cheese in there and you've got a full meal (I brought a pound of cheese to gunsight). Last week AJScott brought those eggs in a carton for breakfast (heavy, but it was an easy approach), and by the time we got to our camp at 6000 ft they had almost exploded from the pressure. Last year a friend of mine ate a whole mountain house meal uncooked, and with nothing to drink. :mistat:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too have had the urge to eat a marmot. The mongolians stuff the marmot belly with coals and then place it directly on a fire. I imagine theres ton of fat in those suckers though. Must need salt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×