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J_Kirby

Racking Cordelettes

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All this whining about too much spray on this board got me to thinking. Would it be possible to actually contribute something of value here?

 

So after I dumped that idea, I started thinking about how I rack my cordelette. I currently use a 25' 5.5mm cord (before knots) that I usually carry hanging from my harness. When racking, I double it over twice and then use the twist and clip method. This can sometimes be time consuming to do when breaking down an anchor at a funky stance.

 

Anyone out there have a more convenient/quicker way to rack your cordelette besides the ole wad it up and stuff it in a pocket method?

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quote:

Originally posted by J_Kirby:

All Would it be possible to actually contribute something of value here?

 

Anyone out there have a more convenient/quicker way to rack your cordelette besides the ole wad it up and stuff it in a pocket method?

First Question...no.

 

Second Question...yes; I do have a quicker better method. [laf]

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Not pretty, but I usually just double it over a few times and tie a huge overhand knot so that it is short enough to clip to a gear loop.

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J_Kirby:

 

I use a cordelette of about the same size. I double mine and then chain knot it like a long runner, clip both ends to a biner and call it good.

 

Greg

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quote:

Originally posted by J_Kirby:

When racking, I double it over twice and then use the twist and clip method. This can sometimes be time consuming to do when breaking down an anchor at a funky stance.

 

Anyone out there have a more convenient/quicker way to rack your cordelette besides the ole wad it up and stuff it in a pocket method?

Dude! How long does that "double it over twice" method take you? For me it takes about 5 maybe 6 seconds. Since yours is longer than mine (heh) let's round up to 10 seconds. Suppose we can figure out some crazy way that takes half as long (I doubt there is a way). You could save yourself a minute on a 12 pitch day! Could be the difference between a cold night on a ledge and warm bed with your girl.

 

Now looking at the opposite side of the coin. Suppose you braid it all up. That could take like a minute. Thus over a dozen pitches that'll cost you like 10 minutes! No wonder those mounties need to get up so early!

 

There are probably better things to think about to save time on climbs.

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This has been hashed out before, but since I've changed my method I'll chime in again.

 

I used to triple the thing and then wind around it and clip the ends. That was too time consuming, but I still use that method at the end of the day because it produces a very neat package.

 

Now I use I's method. Triple it over and tie an overhand in the middle. Quick and easy...

 

The "stick it in pocket" method is asking to loose the cordelette. I've dropped alot of shit out of pockets and the cordelette isn't somthing I want to be dropping often.

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quote:

Originally posted by chucK:

Dude! How long does that "double it over twice" method take you? For me it takes about 5 maybe 6 seconds. Since yours is longer than mine (heh) let's round up to 10 seconds. Suppose we can figure out some crazy way that takes half as long (I doubt there is a way). You could save yourself a minute on a 12 pitch day! Could be the difference between a cold night on a ledge and warm bed with your girl.

 

Now looking at the opposite side of the coin. Suppose you braid it all up. That could take like a minute. Thus over a dozen pitches that'll cost you like 10 minutes! No wonder those mounties need to get up so early!

 

There are probably better things to think about to save time on climbs.[/QB]

THAT was a flame? [laf] The mounty/gumby shot was respectable though.

 

So moving quicker might not be as good a motivation as keeping that cordelette from turning into a king-hell-knot when you try to shake it out and use it at the next belay. I'd rather enjoy the view than try and untangle a twisted mess of 5.5 cord. Hence the search for any better methods. [smile]

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Put it on the locker you used as the main attachment point of the anchor...

 

I think there is plenty of time for racking the cordelette after the leader has clipped in to the next anchor but before he's put you on belay and you can climb - you know, while you're dismantling the anchor.

 

Of course that assumes you don't need more than the first anchor piece for safety, not so smart for hanging belays... [big Grin] Fine for lots and lots of alpine routes though, and I'm guessing most of us aren't concerned with shaving seconds when there are hanging belays involved.

 

Then the real question is how fast can you get the cordelette unracked and retied, to set up the anchor.

 

[Alpine theorist mode=on]

 

Has anybody experimented with not untying the cordelette, just racking it and then adjusting the knot the next time it's used?

 

I guess the procedure would become something like this - lead to the anchor, place and clove hitch the first bomber piece, yell off belay, set-up the rest of the hold-any-fall anchor, grab the pretied cordelette, clip the three loops to the three parts of the anchor, adjust the knot to equalize in the direction of a fall, and put the follower on belay. Throw in a piece for upward pull sometime before starting on the next pitch...

 

If the three loops of the cordelette are about as long as a shoulder-length sling then it can be racked over the shoulder. I think mine may be a little shorter, my cordelettes are 20'. The locker just sits in the main loop the whole time.

 

The other alternative would be to clip the other three loops into the locker and rack the whole thing, preferrably high on the back of a gear sling so it's well out of the way. Either way it should be less of a mess than three shoulder-length slings with biners...

 

Actually, is this the same as Strickland's method? Do you guys use a figure 8 or an overhand for the anchor? The overhand is easier to adjust.

 

[Alpine theorist mode=off, asbestos=on] [big Grin]

 

[ 05-16-2002, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: fleblebleb ]

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Whatever, minor flame is what I said. I'm glad you don't seem to be offended by my sarcasm. [big Grin]

 

You asked for quicker. You're not going to get much quicker than Will's method. Although you can shave off about 1 second by doubling over once, then doubling over twice, instead of doing the 1,2,3 loop method. Flatten it all out and tie a loose overhand in the middle. Works for me. Never gets in the way. Put it on the same biner as my nut tool.

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