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IceIceBaby

the quest for perfect alpine boots

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neri, are you rich??? you spend more time trying to buy gear, and then buying gear, that i have a hard time believing you ever even get to use it?? i mean i know there is always the perfect one, but.........how much gear does one man need??

but who knows, cuz i am weak and fat like borbon.....

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quote:

Originally posted by erik:
neri, are you rich??? you spend more time trying to buy gear, and then buying gear, that i have a hard time believing you ever even get to use it?? i mean i know there is always the perfect one, but.........how much gear does one man need??

but who knows, cuz i am weak and fat like borbon.....

Eric U again… grin.gif" border="0

Any way I need the opinion before I will buy since I would like to save my knees from thrashing... shit Im getting old...(I will ask ton of questions and opinions then I will decide whether to buy or not...Aiming to buy just once ) [Wazzup] I don’t get out as much as I like Alpine climbing but the Ice was decent this season and the rock always good over here so this is my consolation prize I try to do something every weekend but sometime I only get one day …U see that’s why I want to move to the PNW just the job market there sucks

[geek]rolleyes.gif" border="0wink.gif" border="0

[ 04-10-2002: Message edited by: IceIceBaby ]

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Hard to go wrong with Sportivas. Very well designed and fit. I've used Makalu and Nepal Top. They the bomb.

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Non-plastic boots for cold climates/winter:

http://www.tecnicausa.com/hiking/mtn.sht

Summer mountainering/alpine, try the Ascend Bio-Flex. It is lightweight and really comfortable. Good enough for most alpine ice and snow, yet won't kill you on the approach. Soft and responsive enough for modrate alpine rock routes. Good all around boot.

http://www.tecnicausa.com/hiking/backpacking.sht

Jim Nelson carries the Ascend Bio Flex (at least he used to)

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Let me know when you find that boot.

"The Boot" will have a cushioned heel, be full-grain leather, have a stiff plastic thingy above the Vibram sole(instead of a full shank, for cramponing and edging), be re-solable, fit step-in crampons, and be as comfortable and weigh as light as a pair of sneakers.

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I've used boots from La Sportiva (Makalu), Salomon (Guide 9), and Tecnica (Altitude Plus). All of these companies make fine products, and the boots I've had from them worked great for their intended purpose. The latest models from these companies that might suit your needs as "a great approach shoe" as well as a climbing performer in snow and ice are:

La Sportiva Glacier, Makalu, or Trango Plus

Salomon Pro Rock

Tecnica Dunagiri Bio-Flex GTX

Scarpa's Super Manta M4 might work well, too.

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try the Sportiva nepal tops or extremes. I have a pair of sportiva trango extremes, and they rock, but may be to narrow if you have wide feet. Scarpa makes a good leather boot the thermo cerro torre.

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I already own the Nepal top which are about the sweetest Ice boots ever for any normal down to –10F for colder days I have the Lowa Civetta extreme But I need more of a summer/approach/alpine snow and Ice climbing boots I have the pacific crest (old model with the crampon compatible Vibram sole) but I find it not to be padded/shock absorbent enough for my decaying knees

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I picked up a pair of Solomon SM8's a year ago and ran all over the Pickets with them last summer. Good, sturdy, all leather, 3/4 steal shank, crampon compatable boot, which didn't leave my rugby knees hobbled after 20 mile aproaches.

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How about the la sportiva eigers ? they seem to be a great alpine boot for summer and spring on first impressions.

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quote:

Originally posted by IceIceBaby:

I need more of a summer/approach/alpine snow and Ice climbing boots

First, define "alpine snow/ice". Sounds like your covered for pure ice routes. Therefore there is no "perfect" boot. Concentrate on fit first because you'll get a ton of opinions about brand choice and basically they all are well constructed, especially if made in Italy or France. If you go with Salomon, I'm with Norm from what you described... the super 8 is a good boot and offers a very wide range of travel on a variety of surfaces. Just know if you want a good approach and good alpine rock boot, flex is good. This will not be ideal for the ice but until they make a boot where you can alter the flex, it will still be fine. I also did a 5 day trip in the pickets and broke out my old "becky" boots, classic old 3/4 shank, leathers with a ton of snow seal on them. The newer boots are a lot lighter and snap on crampon compatible. Check Sierratradingpost.com for a good deal and don't worry if it's a brand name you know. Some of these are euro boots not normally found in the US and like I said, if made in italy or france, you'll be in good shape. It helps to know your metric size too, it's a lot more accurate!

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quote:

Originally posted by IceIceBaby:
Still on the quest for the perfect alpine boots, right now Im eyeballing the Glacier from La-Sportiva is any one had/have experience with them how good are they on up to 90 degrees ice I guess that the most important feature will be solid performance up to 65 degrees snow/ice a great approach shoe and well cushioned for descent also stiff enough for crampons

David,This is what I originally posted to answer your first Q and thank you for the info. Personally, I am looking for a trend in the majority of good experiences with any particular brand. Giving that I am an average person as far as size.In addition, my metric size is 43 1/2 to 44 in D width 10 US 9.5 English and 25.5 to 26 in Japan [geek]grin.gif" border="0smile.gif" border="0

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Still on the quest for the perfect alpine boots, right now Im eyeballing the Glacier from La-Sportiva is any one had/have experience with them how good are they on up to 90 degrees ice I guess that the most important feature will be solid performance up to 65 degrees snow/ice a great approach shoe and well cushioned for descent also stiff enough for crampons

 

[ 04-16-2002, 06:43 AM: Message edited by: IceIceBaby ]

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Forgot to mention why I like them. Very light in comparison to other boots with similar feature/functions. Step-in compatable. The only boot I didn't get blisters with. Did a 2-day climb of Glacier Peak and, as other could probably attest to, the approach is long and it sucks - but my feet were comfy. And I got 'em on sale. Barrabes.com has pretty good pricing for LaSportivas. I also like the fact that it has no hardware (metal eyelets/hooks) to hang up on rocks, twigs, whatever.

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Finally I did buy a pair of boots the Salomon Ice pro they just fit the best with the best support kind of resembling the Trango extreme but without all the stitching (less prone to leak) and about the same weight Just one downfall is that the rend not extending all the way around

But it seems that they will break in easily for the approach and they are well padded

I will share more of my experiences with the boots performance after couple of trips

[geek][geek]

 

prodimg4.jpg

 

[ 04-14-2002, 07:18 AM: Message edited by: IceIceBaby ]

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Does anyone have a recommendation for a boot that fits wide feet? Seems like most of the boots in this class fit medium to narrow-profile feet. We duckfoots are stuck with painful or poor fitting boots. How about the Saloman?

 

Thanks

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Whats with the bright yellow and orange? Man, that shit is butt ugly. Did I mention that color is just as important in boots as your car! Frickin' Euros are back at it again!

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HAHAHAHHAH [laf][laf]

Anyway, I have a complete rectangular feet and the only one that fit nice were the Salomon…but now when Im thinking of that the La Sportiva Eiger weren't that bad at all in the matter of fact they were a little too wide…so here you go [geek][geek][laf][laf]

 

[ 04-15-2002, 10:50 AM: Message edited by: IceIceBaby ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Jman:

LaSportiva Trango Extreme. But as David

223.jpg

I have used this boot for 2 ice climbing trips this past winter. It wont keep you warm very long ice climbing in the Canadian Rockies or a winter storm around here. Good for sport ice and who knows but maybe some summer mountaineer outings. It is good.

 

Sometimes I need boots is when there is a lot of snow or glacier. Otherwise my sneakers work great with the aluminum stubai crampons.

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I have wide feet and Salomon boots that could not be any smaller length-wise. I've had no problems with the width of those boots though.

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I wear a pair of Scarpa Assaults. They are wearing out, and I am so impressed with how well they climb and have held up for the past 5 years, I will probably buy another pair of Scarpas.

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quote:

Originally posted by IceIceBaby:

HAHAHAHHAH
[laf][laf]

Anyway, I have a complete rectangular feet and the only one that fit nice were the Salomon…but now when Im thinking of that the La Sportiva Eiger weren't that bad at all in the matter of fact they were a little too wide…so here you go
[geek][geek][laf][laf]

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Well, a couple years ago I had to give up on my old Peuterays, they just couldn't take anymore. I've sort of idly sought a perfect "cascades" boot for awhile: something light, stiff enough for snow and moderate ice, okay on rock up to 5.9ish, flexy enough to approach in. Not a boot for waterfalls, thats a specialized trade, I wanted something for the generalist. As others have noted, fit is the key, and I tried on a pair of Sportiva Trangos and was immediately smitten. In rock shoes, I've never thought of myself as having a Sportiva foot, but these were right, even have a nice little solid block in the sole right in the edging sweet spot. I have a feeling they've been discontinued, since this is NOT the Trango Extreme, not insulated that way, more of a summer boot, which is my alpine season anyway. Winter, I tend to favor a snowboard boot, if you get my drift. Anyway, works for me, but I have a funny feeling I won't get 20 years out of this boot...

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