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johnh

Gear for Muir?

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My daughter (10) and I will be doing the route up to camp muir on June 15th. She has all of the proper clothing and equipment (fleece, shells, goggles, poles, etc.). Will hiking boots be OK or will she need to rent mountaineering boots. Should I take her crampons? She has already been high up on Hood and Lassen.

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I walked up to Muir in my Montrail trail runners. It was August so the snow was pretty well packed down by then, though.

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Hiking boots should be fine, as long as they stay dry. Crampons could be useful, might be a great place to try them out if she's never done so. I wish someone would have taken me out on trips like that when I was 10.

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Muir is kind of interesting. There are times when you can make it in sneakers and times when crampons are needed.

If she is 10, then I would rent a pair of mountaineering boots, and crampons, properly fitted at the store, so she can get some experience on the mountaineering boots and maybe crampons.

My daughter is 8, and I think I am going to try and do Muir with her either this summer or next.

When ever I take my children out I am the over packed Boy Scout complete all 10 of the essentials.

 

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I do not mean to dis sirwoofalot in any way because it is personal choice. But, I would not put my 11 yr old daughter in plastic boots and crampons unless she really wanted it. Steel points are painful when inserted into the lower leg.

If there has been good weather, there will be a packed trail/trough from Paradise to Muir.

There can be crevasses up higher but it is typically not an issue as they are well marked. There was a case in the last couple years where the snow was melting rapidly and someone fell into a crevass below Muir on the trail. It was shallow so there were no serious injuries as I remember.

I would keep it simple. Gear she is used to and her feet are comfortable in. Lots of her favorite treats as the 4500 elevation gain is a mood buster. Pack as light as you safely can.

I will be up there with my daughter some time this June too. But the 15th is the day of her school carnival.

Keep it fun so she wants to come back for more.

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Bug,

No offence taken.

When it comes to my children I am all ears and ready to learn more.

You make a very good points about plastic and crampons. I need to rethink this. I would like to point out I have been at Camp Muir in June and was glad I decided to bring my crampons. If I had not brought them then I never would have made it to Muir.

 

So the question then becomes how important is it to make your goal, Muir, and the risk of puncturing yourself with a crampon?

 

I do agree with bug that most likely you will not need crampons, and comfortable feet are always good to have. However, if you daughter is ready for them, and conditions dictate that you should have then, then it will add to the fun, excitement and adventure going to Muir. Do keep in mind the risk of getting punctured by a crampon as bug pointed out.

 

I do agree with bug in Johnh needs to asses the conditions of his daughter, weather and snow. I agree that he should try to keep his daughters load light, possibly nothing. And lots and lots of hear favorite snacks. It is not just the 4500 foot elevation gain; it is also starting at 5500 feet, and going to 10,000 feet. That is the real attitude killer.

 

One of my tricks is I run a hydration tube off of my pack to my daughter, and put lots of snacks in her pockets. She has all the food and water ready at any time. I go slowly enough so she can go all day. Finally when I feel a pull on the hydration tube then I slow down, and adjust my speed accordingly. By going first I slow her down at the start so she has more energy for the whole day. (I am constantly checking to make sure I have not pulled away, and I don’t always go first. Sometimes she will lead.)

 

One final trick we do is a name game. We start with the letter A, and think of as many silly names for a dog with starting with the letter A. We go through the entire alphabet that way. This keeps her mind off of how sore and tired her legs are getting.

 

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Thanks for the advice. I am planning on having her carry just a small camelback and I am going to carry the rest. I have a pair of G-10s that fit her boots that I am going to take just in case but I think that just the added security of trekking poles will be sufficient.

Has anyone had there children go through any of the snow schools offered by the various guide services? I learned a lot when I went to one with Timberline at Hood.

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Not knowing whether or not you need to hear this, I will say it:

Be very sure you know how to navigate back to Paradise in a white-out. They are always a possibility and trips to Muir have cost people their lives because they weren't prepared.

 

As for footwear, I have done it in leather tennis shoes before. Her hiking boots, if waterproof, will be the perfect footwear for Muir.

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I am so excited for you.

I know my daughter is still to young for this trip, but she will be ready all too soon.

Please do have fun, and enjoy

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Not knowing whether or not you need to hear this, I will say it:

Be very sure you know how to navigate back to Paradise in a white-out. They are always a possibility and trips to Muir have cost people their lives because they weren't prepared.

 

Already prepared. Compass, map, gps, and the knowledge to use them.

If anyone is going to be on the mountain, June 14-16, give us a shout.

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Dag nab it!

I really wish I could go. I will be on a charted fishing boat with my son, 11.

I am sure you will have lots of fun, oh, and if the weather is nice expect about 100,000 people to be with you. well maybe not that many but a lot.

Oh, have you check to see if the road is open? I see you are from TN.

Did you know that Rainier was closed since November '06 from extreem flooding?

You might want to check and confirm that.

 

 

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The road is open; it opened a couple weeks back. But, due to construction, there's really limited parking at Paradise, so get there early. I think there's also a shuttle.

 

 

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Don't underestimate the power of young women.

 

Samantha successfully reached the summit of Everest on May 16th, 2007 and is now the youngest person to have climbed the Seven Summits.

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Don't underestimate the power of young women.

 

Samantha successfully reached the summit of Everest on May 16th, 2007 and is now the youngest person to have climbed the Seven Summits.

 

That is simply amazing! What a credit to young people all across the world she is. About me.

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Totally cool and totally hot.

You go girl.

My daughters will be on your site soon.

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Johnh, you probably won't need crampons for going to Muir, but I would highly recommend having a polypro base layer and a pair of nylon shorts to go over top ("courtesy" shorts).

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Dunno if anyone mentioned this yet (or actually if the campground is open?), but it helped us a ton last August to camp at the Cougar Rock campground just below Paradise Much easier to just roll out of the tent and head up to Paradise for an early start. Helps beat the crowds a bit too.

 

We hiked it last August in light hikers and good 'ol hiking boots, and did just fine. Crampons would probably be nice for the earlier season.

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Had a great time on Rainier on our way up to Muir. It rained the whole trip, but that just added to the mountain experiance. My daughter was the only person under 18 that we saw all day. She got many good comments from the other climbers on the route. Thanks again for the advice from everyone.

 

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Edited by johnh

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