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selkirk

Driving Screws!

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Ok, get your mind out of the gutter....

 

Anybody have any tricks for driving screws in awkard positions? I'm trying to mount a hangboard and having a hell of time getting the screws to sink. It's an old house so I have a feeling it's a 2"x8" beam behind the door, and I just can't keep enough pressure on the drill or screw driver to keep the bit from slipping and stripping the screw heads :anger: I don't want to drill too large a starter hole so that I don't comprimise the strength, and I don't know that I would trust a small bit to get in 3 inches??

 

Any ideas would be much appreciated!!

Cheers

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You only have to use the tiniest starter bit and have it go in about a quarter inch for it to create a seat for the tip of the drywall screw to get a start.

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Oh, they start just fine (used a small bit for that). It's getting the last 3/4" of a 3" screw in that's driving me nuts!

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hmmm, not particulary wide heads 1/4" or 3/8" maybe? The heads fit the standard phillips head bits I have.

 

I see where you going there, is there something with a wider head that I get some more torque on before it slips?

 

Now that I think about it I should probably just get square drives :)

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No, you are just fucked.

I've hung a lot of drywall, and sometimes I'd get so frustrated at the number of times I'd be pushing on the drill and it would slip off the screwhead and put another hole in the wall. Makes me mad just thinking about it.

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I should be so lucky tonight.

 

I'm thinking square drives would do it though. Slow, but the bits shouldn't slip out and strip the heads.

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Secret hints in PM.

 

I don't want all these night owls to learn the jedi way of drywall and mudding.

 

Good luck!

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get square drive screws. This is probably not a great solution at 10:30 pm, but it will be tits tomorrow after you get back from the hardware store.

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When you are sinking screws into old wood you need to drill a full-depth pilot hole that is just smaller than the threads. You'll find the screw goes in much more easily and it will hold just fine.

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If it's old dry wood you may want a full depth pilot hole just to keep the wood from splitting. There are different sized phillips head and you may not have the right size. but it could just be the awkward angle, as you mention. If you can set the clutch on your driver, set it lower to get just enough torque and allow it to slip before it starts spinning in the head of the screw. But if you don't mind the look, a square drive screw, as you noted, is probably your best solution.

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Don't let the drill go too fast either. Specially with phillips heads.

 

All screwing should be done slowly. 8D

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Dip the screw threads in motor oil. Have a rag handy to wipe off the excess after that little baby slides right in.

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Cordless drills don't work worth a damn for driving screws. Buy yourself a cordless impact driver. The screws will go in like buttah. Buy a drill chuck for it and throw your cordless drill into the trash where it belongs.

 

Cordless Impact Driver review

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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Impactor and Robertson screws!! even with a little 12v'er you can drive a 4' screw in one side of a 4x4 post and out the other without any noticable torque on your hands. 1000+lb/feet torque as apposed to 400-500lb/ft for a high-end 18v or better cordless drill. Also you will almost never strip out screw heads.

 

Even the inferiour phillips heads won't strip!

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(proper-size) pilot hole solution = 1/8" X 6" (or 8", depending on availability) drill bit

 

additionally, as suggested, DRY handsoap or parafin applied to screw threads.

 

do not use oils as thread lubricant when it will get on drywall as it can fuck with subsequent paint/finish applications.

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Surf's up dude. heat your screws with a lighter, and touch them to some Mr. Zoggs Sex Wax. They slide into wood like the Seventh Fleet into your sister!!( just kidding) it really works though

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Woohoo, damn things up! Star drive screws, did the trick ! Thanks all. Now I can continue hurting my fingers :P

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