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archenemy

I am going to buy a new Mtn bike today. right now.

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I bought a Specialized Hardrock Sport for $270 a couple years ago. It has been good especially since I'm not a hard core mountain biker. Cheap components but I have been told that the frame is really good.

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I will go look for a kona hardtail sounds like what I am looking for. I am going to go try them out.

 

Funny, I have a fancy schmancy Specialized for my love bike.

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go get a fixed gear, some tats, a bad haircut, some tight ass jeans, and last but not last a BAD attitude and go ride around the u district. that's the in thing these days!

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This is good advice.

I figure if I can find something today for under $300 that doesn't leave a dent in my ass, I'll get it. And then, I'll do exactly as you say and really pay attention to what is out there, what works for me, and get something really good.

 

What kind of riding will you do? How often? I go infrequently - sometimes with my kids - and the lower end bike was fine (around $260 - Specialized Hardrock). I do fairly easy stuff, some moderate single track, lots of gravel roads. St Edwards Park, Lord Hill, Iron Horse trail, Mackworth park, etc.

 

I recommend getting a bike with the shock absorber on the front - but that's just one step above minimal.

 

I don't have toe clips like I do for my road bike. That'll cost you a bit more.

Edited by KaskadskyjKozak

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Oh Muffy, I'd love to help you out! I have a super old road bike thats like 15 years old.... its still works... I love building up super-fcuked looking bikes with miscellaneous parts. They always seem to work the best and look the coolest (to me).

 

As far a nice sparkly and new road bikes, Specialized and Trek are the two companies on the cutting edge of geometry and materials. But honestly, hardly anyone [needs] a $2000 bike!

 

I'd go online and just learn stuff, then go to different shops and test ride different models. The more research you do the happier you'll be in the end!

 

I think road biking is amazing......it builds the quads in a more balanced way than almost any other sport. Just look at Lance's Vastus Medialis, its huge!

 

i have been spinning pretty regularly but i am sick of the gym. i want to play outside. i have an "okay" bike that i can put miles on with out any dificulty. but i want something a little faster and a little more better. but i wil not spend more than 600 bones. i would love to have a hybrid bike if they were not insainly expensive. i can not wait to get out of the cast and back to doing ANYTHING!!!

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Honestly, if you go around to all the used spots in town (including eBay) and build it up on your own you can get a super dialed bike for like 150 bucks.

 

If you don't know what to look for exactly, buying something used online has been the best deals I've seen.

 

Otherwise, seriously, Konas are good bikes and they are not too outrageous (some people hate them with a passion though - wankers).

 

I also agree with your wanting to play outside longings........ cardio inside just sucks......

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"i can not wait to get out of the cast and back to doing ANYTHING!!!"

 

 

Wait wait, WHAT?! What did you break and how did you do it? I'm into this kind of stuff...

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what should I get?

 

How about a huge shut the fuck up troll....do you really need to ask on this site what kind of bike to get. Holy crap....queen of trolls.

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"i can not wait to get out of the cast and back to doing ANYTHING!!!"

 

 

Wait wait, WHAT?! What did you break and how did you do it? I'm into this kind of stuff...

 

there is a whole thred here about me breaking my foot. I jumped out of bed and hit the gound running cus i thought i had missed my kiddos coming home from thier dads house. my right leg was still a sleep. I was moving so fast that i was past my leg when i realized it wasn't holding me up and down i went over the top of my foot. i broke off chips betweebt the first and second metatarcel.

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I've got an old Specialized Stumpjumper hardtail and it's still one of the lightest, most versatile bikes out there for the kind of riding you're talking about. Great for tri racing with slicks on.

 

A lightweight pair of clipless pedals is highly recommended, if you don't have them already. There are some great mag alloy versions that are inexpensive and feather light...great unless you're launching off sweet jumps and landing wrong a lot.

 

Lite tires & tubes also will make a big difference.

 

For accessories: Performancebike.com, nashbar.com

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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You should get something that you can take off some sweet jumps!

 

Hell yes! My moto, and rehab protocols for broken bones has alway been to catch as much air as possible as soon as possible.... in fact today, I'm feeling some BMX trails tingles...... I found a rad new spot in this guy's back yard thats downhill, and the jumps are all hips (meaning they turn a little).

 

Last week though I was riding out there, and came into this one set with so much extra speed that I couldn't make the "turn" toward the landing (because they are all hips) and I went flying off into the woods. Thankfully there were tons of ferns and leaves and things and not too many dead logs, so I crashed and burned without any [real] damage...

 

BMX is so sick......

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I've got an old Specialized Stumpjumper hardtail and it's still one of the lightest, most versatile bikes out there for the kind of riding you're talking about. Great for tri racing with slicks on.

 

A lightweight pair of clipless pedals is highly recommended, if you don't have them already. There are some great mag alloy versions that are inexpensive and feather light...great unless you're launching off sweet jumps and landing wrong a lot.

 

Lite tires & tubes also will make a big difference.

 

For accessories: Performancebike.com, nashbar.com

 

i only know what about half of that means. I need someone to just point me at the bike to buy :nurd:

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Archy

300 bucks isn't going to buy you much of a mountain bike... Try to get your friends to loan you thiers and see what you think. It's like buying climbing gear, it's not cheap. Try to figure out what kind of riding you want to do, cross country, stunts, lift serve, fire roads, city.....

 

Muffy

Check out the local bike shops when it's raining or during the week so they can spend some time with you.

 

I've bought 3 bikes from Gregs, it just depends who you talk to and how much time they have. If you need work done take it to Wright Brothers of Fluid Ride. ( Seattle )

 

Trail info wiki

http://trailheadrevolution.com/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

 

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Hey Arch,

 

I think someone has already mentioned it, but gou get what you pay for. If you love cycling then invest the time and money into it. Also it sounds like you have a bike right now that might be similar to what you are looking for, get rid of it and put it towards your new ride, unless it is quite different or you have some other purpose for it like turing it into a commuter or touring rig. It better to have one bike that you love rather than many that are so-so.

 

First thing figure out the type of riding. Fire roads, single track, cross country, technical or non technical, free riding, all mountain or down hill? I can tell you right now that you will be hard pressed to find a decent ride sub $500 that will hold well for technical, fr, am or dh. (Except for some hard tails).

 

Decide how frequently you are going to ride. Ocassionally on the weekend, every weekend, commuting, every day? For ocasional and every weekend you should be able to find something for sub $500. For every weekend and some commuting, it will be worth while to spend more for better components. If you are into riding every day then get something you are going to love riding, I tend to be in this arena I don't care what I spend and buy what I like.

 

Once you have figured this out, get out and try riding as many bikes as possible. It doesn't cost anything to go to shops and try them out. Try everything even the one you thought you might not be into. Make notes about how you feel on the bike, later this will help. Once you have done this now narrow down your price range and bikes of interest. There may have been expensive bikes that you tried that felt great, it might be simple things that you can do on your cheaper bike to give you a similar feel. Like a big saddle for your big ass, you mentioned, from you calender pictures, I can't picture that, but maybe the winter was bad for you. Longer or shorter stem, riser bars or straight bars, even better grips, pedals, better shock, these are all things that a decent shop will swap out and give you some credit towards the upgrades.

 

Then get out and ride and don't gouge your eye out!

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It's also worth mentioning that today's "low-end" components are probably better than high-end components from just a few years ago. A mt. bike equipped with Shimano LX components will be significantly less expensive than a bike with XT gear, but today's LX line is pretty darn bomb-proof. Less expensive bikes tend to be heavy but often come with pretty good components (by good I mean functional and reliable).

 

After finding the bike you want at the local shop, start looking on line and also second-hand. With the money you'll save on a used bike, you'll be able to upgrade/repair components.

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