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Skeezix

Crazy F*ckers and Mr. Glock

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Yes, in this one case. I am sure there are more like his. I am sure there are misdiagnosis.

Why were Cho's records public? Just curious.

 

And the gun comment is parsing tiny differences. Many bullets on the market are just as deadly as hollowpoints. IN this case, hollowpoints were an overkill anyhow.

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Cho should have been a blow job. That's the most important issue here - too much procreation, not enough blow jobs.

Edited by dt_3pin

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[i also find that if someone searches another person's mental records--and let's remember that psychologist are not infalible--is an intensely personal invasion of privacy.

All good points except the above point; in the case of Cho the medical records were not private medical records - they were public district court records. I fail to see how a background check that accesses public records is invasive.

 

Likewise I did not say that gun owners were a small percentage; I said a small percentage of America wants to buy "handguns and hollow point bullets".

 

you call those show stoppers (hollow point). Some freak comes into my house he going to get a show stopper. If He is armed he will be dead if not a leg will do.

 

Guess I'm the small percentage.

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Eight year anniversary of Columbine shootings, but all the students there, now, were in elementary school then. It's just a normal school, nowadays.

wish it were - about 50% of my kids are gone 2day - course, i'm sure it has nothign to do w/ the beautiful day outside :P

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Eight year anniversary of Columbine shootings, but all the students there, now, were in elementary school then. It's just a normal school, nowadays.

wish it were - about 50% of my kids are gone 2day - course, i'm sure it has nothign to do w/ the beautiful day outside :P

 

Thinking about playing hooky here at work, dang it's nice outside and rain coming for weekend and sunny Monday. Go figure.

Edited by Seahawks

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2. In regards to freedom; I believe an intrinsic freedom should be that students can go to class without fear of being shot.

 

Really? They're not supposed to pack up and move to another school? (cf. gunfire outside Tommy's and my apartment)

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2. In regards to freedom; I believe an intrinsic freedom should be that students can go to class without fear of being shot.

 

Really? They're not supposed to pack up and move to another school? (cf. gunfire outside Tommy's and my apartment)

 

Are you really trying to compare living by a bar and hearing a couple of gunshots to school massacres? The situation at your apartment is lame (and I hope your are able to safely resolve it w/out moving), but so is your analogy. When's the last time 32 people were killed outside your aparment, much less one?

Edited by dt_3pin

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The first thing Bush said was that we had to obey gun laws. Well, there are laws against murder, too, and that didn't seem to stop him. But I digress. Some gun nuts, even a senator I heard on NPR, claimed that the gun laws on campuses are too restrictive, and that if more of the students had been armed, they may have been able to plant one between this guys eyes and stop him before he killed 32 people. I suggest that we take it a step further, and not only do we make it legal for us to carry weapons wherever we want, but require all Americans to defend each other, and require all citizens to be armed at all times. We could all be standing in line at the bank, just watching and waiting for someone to show his face to the teller, pushing that note forward, and when they look around and the teller gives the nod, everyone in the place would just open fire on the scumbag. There'd be nothing left of him. Problem solved. How much crime would there be left after a year or two? Not much, after all of our criminals had been turned to swiss cheese by armed, obedient citizens. Even if not all of them were armed, we could have just a few of them carry guns, just some that are trained, just a few from the fringes of society, former playground bullies, jerks, wife-beaters, maladjusted types that would want to carry firearms and deal with situations involving criminals in our society. Oh, wait - we have those already. We call them police.

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Brah, you should have saved yer 420 post for something a bit more kynd. . .

 

The first thing Bush said was that we had to obey gun laws. Well, there are laws against murder, too, and that didn't seem to stop him. But I digress. Some gun nuts, even a senator I heard on NPR, claimed that the gun laws on campuses are too restrictive, and that if more of the students had been armed, they may have been able to plant one between this guys eyes and stop him before he killed 32 people. I suggest that we take it a step further, and not only do we make it legal for us to carry weapons wherever we want, but require all Americans to defend each other, and require all citizens to be armed at all times. We could all be standing in line at the bank, just watching and waiting for someone to show his face to the teller, pushing that note forward, and when they look around and the teller gives the nod, everyone in the place would just open fire on the scumbag. There'd be nothing left of him. Problem solved. How much crime would there be left after a year or two? Not much, after all of our criminals had been turned to swiss cheese by armed, obedient citizens. Even if not all of them were armed, we could have just a few of them carry guns, just some that are trained, just a few from the fringes of society, former playground bullies, jerks, wife-beaters, maladjusted types that would want to carry firearms and deal with situations involving criminals in our society. Oh, wait - we have those already. We call them police.

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2. In regards to freedom; I believe an intrinsic freedom should be that students can go to class without fear of being shot.

 

Really? They're not supposed to pack up and move to another school? (cf. gunfire outside Tommy's and my apartment)

 

Are you really trying to compare living by a bar and hearing a couple of gunshots to school massacres? The situation at your apartment is lame (and I hope your are able to safely resolve it w/out moving), but so is your analogy. When's the last time 32 people were killed outside your aparment, much less one?

My take on Gary's comment was that he was referring to the right to not live in fear of being shot. His analogy is perfect for that discussion.

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This is what constitutes mentally ill? Calling girls and thinking about offing himself? Wow, that makes every teenager I've ever met mentally ill. True, Cho did freak out and kill a bunch of people, but if folks are saying that his previous "mental health records" would have given any insight whatsoever to his eventual actions, they'd need to explain where they see that link.

 

"The magistrate acted after Cho was taken to—and evaluated by—a local psychiatric hospital, following complaints to Virginia Tech campus police made by two female schoolmates. The two women said that Cho was contacting them with “annoying” telephone calls and e-mail messages. When campus police got a phone call from another acquaintance of Cho’s, expressing concern that he was suicidal, they sought and obtained the temporary detention order from the magistrate in the Montgomery County Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court. Cho was then voluntarily but briefly admitted to Carilion Saint Albans, a local psychiatric hospital doctor there reported that Cho was "depressed" but “denies suicidal ideations" and did not "acknowledge symptoms of a thought disorder,” according to records obtained by the Richmond Times-Dispatch.)

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Fair enough, and I agree that everyone (even Gary) should be able to live w/out fear of gun violence. Gary, however, is presented with some choices that school shooting victims aren't. Principaly, he is aware of the risks associated with living where he does and could likely find alternative housing that meets his criteria without too much difficulty. It's not like he's unemployed, unskilled, and trapped in a violent neighborhood.

 

Hopefully that won't be necessary, and in a perfect world, the police and bar owners would address his legitimate complaints. But there comes a time when you need to take responsibility for your choices. I lived on capital hill for a while, which was convenient for school at SU, but we had chronic problems with violently aggressive transients living in a van in front of our house, syringes and shit in our garden, and car prowls. My wife and I (justifiably) felt unsafe. We made complaints to the police when we could, but ultimately decided to move to a less convenient, but quiter, neighborhood. I assume that if those kids at Va Tech would have been given an analogous choice, they would have taken it. But Cho did not present them w/ choices.

 

Edited by dt_3pin

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I did not express myself clearly.

 

 

None of us gets out of living with the fears that come with living in our society.

 

Sorry those kids had to go through this. They will incorporate their experience into their lives, work through it, and get beyond it. Just like people do all over the world all through history.

 

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I do not have statistics in front of me, but there are quite a few people (1000?) every year who have saved their lives by using a gun to defend themselves against an attacker.

 

Guns in the hands of honest citizens are not the problem, and passing legislation that takes guns out of the hands of honest citizens will not deter criminals from using guns.

 

I firmly believe that removing the second amendment from the constitution will only be the beginning of the loss of our basic human rights. I know that some of the people who exercise their rights (such as free speech, freedom of religion, etc) offend all of us sometimes, but I do not agree that some of our rights should be taken away just because they are inconvenient.

 

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I do not have statistics in front of me, but there are quite a few people (1000?) every year who have saved their lives by using a gun to defend themselves against an attacker.

 

Guns in the hands of honest citizens are not the problem, and passing legislation that takes guns out of the hands of honest citizens will not deter criminals from using guns.

 

I firmly believe that removing the second amendment from the constitution will only be the beginning of the loss of our basic human rights. I know that some of the people who exercise their rights (such as free speech, freedom of religion, etc) offend all of us sometimes, but I do not agree that some of our rights should be taken away just because they are inconvenient.

The "beginning"? Where you been buddy?

I agree with you completely on the threat to personal rights though!

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I do not have statistics in front of me, but there are quite a few people (1000?) every year who have saved their lives by using a gun to defend themselves against an attacker.

 

That's convenient. :rolleyes: I do have the stats in front of me and in 2005 368,178 crimes were commited with firearams and 11,351 murders were committed.

http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/glance/tables/guncrimetab.htm

 

 

 

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Kacey Ruegsegger Johnson...the 25-year-old Columbine survivor...said, her first reaction after hearing of Monday's campus massacre at Virginia Tech wasn't fear.

 

"It was just sadness that there's other people going through the horrible thing that I've lived through," she said.

 

The lessons of Columbine, she said, have made her a better nurse.

 

"I feel like I have so much to give because of what I went through," Johnson said.

 

Eight years removed from that traumatic day at school, life is good, Johnson said, and she wants the Virginia Tech survivors to know that even though they may feel their world will never the same, one day they, too, will find a new equilibrium.

 

"I feel normal," she said. "It's a different kind of normal, but it's normal."

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...everyone (even Gary) should be able to live w/out fear of gun violence.

 

That'd be nice, but it's possible only by personal mental state, not external conditions.

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...everyone (even Gary) should be able to live w/out fear of gun violence.

 

That'd be nice, but it's possible only by personal mental state, not external conditions.

 

Wow.

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