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canboom

Clipping into the belay?

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I keep a sling girth-hitched on my harness for clipping into anchors.

 

I too keep a sling (with a couple overhand knots in it so you can clip shorter lengths of it) girthed onto my belay loop. however, i don't think i'd do this with some of the newer (ie., really, really thin) slings that are out these days. just seems like they could wear out easier (maybe i'm just paranoid...).

 

especially when doing a lot of rappels, having a method of tying into the belay that doesn't involve the rope seems like the best plan, but to each their own...

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Figure 8 = Knot to tie behind belay device so I can keep partner safe but free my hands for something (e.g. sort rack and flake rope at belay before partner leads next pitch).

 

Remind me sometime when we are climbing together and I'll teach you the Mule Knot. It is easy to tie. It is better for tying off your partner because it can be released when weighted. It comes in handy in rescues and escaping the belay.

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chitch.gif

 

Hmmm. I've used the clove hitch a bit; but this picture indicates that it would be way too easy to end up with the wrong strand loaded.

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There are two ways to tie a Mule Knot. The following one is the one I prefer and the one that is generally the easiest to learn.

 

http://www.planetmountain.com/english/Lab/techniques/mole/index.html

 

The following method is somewhat harder to learn:

 

http://www.spadout.com/wiki/index.php/Mule_Knot

 

But it is more similar to the Munter Mule, so if you can tie one you can tie the other.

 

 

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The times I belay off the anchor are when my partner (plus pack) is large and expected to fall/hang substantially.

 

Hey, is that why you belay off the anchor when we climb together, because you expect me to fall :wave:

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I've spent over 30 years using the clove hitch to clip in with no problems ever. It is simple, it works, it's adjustable and the most important thing...IT'S SIMPLE! There are no rules. Always make your own as you go. ALWAYS think for yourself. That's what makes a leader.

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chitch.gif

 

Hmmm. I've used the clove hitch a bit; but this picture indicates that it would be way too easy to end up with the wrong strand loaded.

 

 

These are both tied the same way, I think what they are trying to highlight is having the load end closer to the spine of the carabiner. In my opinion it probably doesn't matter too much either way.

 

The one handed technique will always have your load end closer to the spine. If you tie a clove hitch like I do (finger wrap and shift loops one in fromt of the other) then just make sure your load end gets clipped first.

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He posted that same video on his first post.

 

He's the "Homeless mountain guide from Banff".

Edited by catbirdseat

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... By anchoring myself with the belay rope,(as hemp22 suggests above) and then belaying off the tie-in point on my harness, I keep the maximum amount of shock-absorbing rope in service to protect my belay anchor.

 

...but if you read up on self-rescue methodologies (escaping a belay) and recently adopted standards of the AMGA, this is the least desireable method of belaying a second. Worth looking into.

 

In summary though, there are at least "a few" common situations that all dictate a best method of belaying. Experience and lots of attention to the seemingly constant evolution of "the best" way to do things is always good.

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First one must learn that "the best" is situational. If I am worried about shockloading the anchors, but I have a good stance, then belaying off the harness is great. If anchors are bombproof, go off the anchors. Judgement rather than rules.

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Clove hitch to locker at powerpoint. Even in the exceptionally unlikely event that the knot slips under load, you're still attached to the anchor. If the biner breaks, you're hosed, but this is true no matter how you attach yourself to the said biner.

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