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layton

Patagonia Finn approach shoe.

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On my never ending quest to find the best approach shoe, I came across Patagonia's new line of shoes. I got the fin.

 

Pros:

Iron Clad Warranty-I've pretty much destroyed every approach shoe I've ever worn after one season. Hopefully patagonia's excellent construction reputation will outlast their best warranty of any outdoor company. I expect to get at least 5 years out of these if I have to exchange them for a new pair after I've abused them.

Light: less that 2 pounds

Eco-friendlier: made of recycled material.

 

Cons: fucking expensive. I had a gift certificate. But the warranty and expected lifetime should offset the price, as all of their clothing usually does.

Not waterproof-I think this is a pro. Every shoe is gonna get soaked, might as well have it dry quick.

Narrow in the forefoot-when will shoe manufactures realize that the widest part of the human foot is the toebox? Come on! It will help with technical scrambling and climbing though. Still, I'd rather have a nice wide toebox.

 

So if you can afford it, i think these shoes are a good investment since they are really well made, feel comfy, climb fine, are light, and have a kick ass warranty.

 

I returned a 10 year old jacket to them...at THEIR REQUEST. Seriously, I walked in wearing an old jacket of theirs, and they told me to return it! I got a brand new jacket, and since prices went down since I bought it, I got a free raincoat out of the deal...plus a $50 gift certificate I applied towards these shoes. Can't beat that!

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Just abused them for 5 days in Red Rocks, and they held up great, hiked great, and climbed great.

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I finally destroyed my Mountain Masters after 3 years of heavy use. I noticed that these come in size fricken huge. I will have to get a pair.

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Saw these at the Escape Route in Whistler on the weekend. Gotta say I think the fabric will get trashed much quicker than leather, as it always does. I want to see an approach shoe with 100% rands, all the way to the laces!

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Picked up a pair of the Huckleberry last week. Very comfortable, feel very sturdy, and look great.

 

Time will tell on the wear factor.

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So after a few months, I'd have to say they are good hikers, very comfy, and held up great. Major downside, they don't stick to rock worth a goddamn.

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Major downside, they don't stick to the rock worth a goddamn.

 

almost, but not quite, completly unlike whitney houston

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Hopefully patagonia's excellent construction reputation will outlast their best warranty of any outdoor company. I expect to get at least 5 years out of these if I have to exchange them for a new pair after I've abused them.

 

Patagonia contracted out to Merrell to manufacture their shoes.

Patagonia makes great gear...not so sure about Merrell.

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So you are saying they are not as sticky as Montrail Hardrocks. I have used my Hardrocks for many a class 3 climb. Are the Finns not recommended for that?

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