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bstach

Malamute Logged...WTF???

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The land is zoned for a log sort, as I understand it. In clearing it, Mr Turner appears to have run roughshod over the District's Site Alteration Bylaw, which has provisions for some fairly stiff penalties - up to $10,000 per removed tree. In addition, much if not all the land in question was "blue listed" in the environmental assessment undertaken by the department of highways, so it's possible he could be facing penalties from the provincial government as well.

 

He has deep roots in "Old Squamish", and close ties with some significant community members, including a couple of members of Council. So we'll see just how far they're willing to pursue this - I know some key District staff are working on this, and at least one Council member, but the Mayor and Council may need a little encouragement to enforce their bylaw. Letters to each council member including the mayor would probably be appropriate, but keep it civil - they're as surprised as anyone by this development. It has caught all of us off-guard, and is in no way a reflection of the community's wishes.

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b_14_b.jpg

 

Welcome to the new age. We're beyond hope...the end is near. Stay tuned for a finely worded memo from the MAN.

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that's fucked up.

 

No more so than you being a home owner and some wanker comes along and starts telling you what you can and can't do with your freehold tenure that you paid for.

 

You guys have a problem with it, get your checkbook out and deal with it like the FMCBC et al did across the road a bunch of years back otherwise bite your tongue; unless of course you want to promote a society that thinks it OK to pass idiotic bylaws that purport to fine property owners $10K/tree for unauthorized harvest.

 

 

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that's fucked up.

 

No more so than you being a home owner and some wanker comes along and starts telling you what you can and can't do with your freehold tenure that you paid for.

 

You guys have a problem with it, get your checkbook out and deal with it like the FMCBC et al did across the road a bunch of years back otherwise bite your tongue; unless of course you want to promote a society that thinks it OK to pass idiotic bylaws that purport to fine property owners $10K/tree for unauthorized harvest.

 

 

Are you for real? There are all kinds of laws governing what one can and can't do with thier own private property. I live in crowded city but want to turn my backyard into a a slaughter house for the pigs I'm raising in my front lawn. Is there a problem with this? Yes because although it is my property, cutting up pigs on my lawn is going to negatively effects my neighbors.

 

Cutting down trees on the Malmute is shameful and negatively effects the entire Squamisha area as whole, not just climbers. The only economy Squamish hasa left is tourists. Tourists don't won't come to look at clear-cut.

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Are you for real? ...

 

Yup...and trust me, whacking down a few second (or third?) growth trees across from a 1 ac paved parking lot and a 4 lane highway will not despoil your sacred "wilderness" experience nor will it make a material difference in the ecology of the area. Climbers will continue to flock to Squamish, tourists will continue to blast up the highway to Whistler in their gas guzzling SUVs, and in 6 months you'll be wondering what all the fuss was about.

 

 

 

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Many people place the value of trees in their living state, as providers of shade, as generators of oxygen, as cleansers of air, as homes for mammals, birds and bugs, as an inheritance given to us in trust to pass on to future generations in perpetuity, as benefits to the entire community.

 

Conversely, others view trees as a nuisances towering above us, as an expendable asset owned by the titleholder of the property on which it stands, as a commodity that should be cut down for the almighty dollar.

 

I note that the District of Squamish has adopted the Smart Growth on the Ground (SGOG) planning process. SGOG is all about the following (from the SGOG - Squamish website (http://www.sgog.bc.ca/content.asp?contentID=129): 'The Squamish-Lillooet Regional District was the fastest-growing region in BC between 1996 and 2001, and the 2010 Olympics promises that rapid growth will continue. As the future unfolds, Squamish will need to accommodate growth and development, while ensuring that the quality of life and its beautiful natural surroundings - the very qualities that attract people to the Sea to Sky Corridor and the Outdoor Recreation Capital of Canada - are preserved.'

 

Thank you to concerned citizens who are showing and voicing their support and are working to preserve the trees, the natural surroundings and the recreational assets in this rapidly developing community.

 

'We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.' -- Aldo Leopold [1887-1948], American conservationist.

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Many people place the value of trees in their living state...

 

Unlike hypocrites like you, I'm comfortable and guilt free living in a world that values trees in both their living and unliving states.

 

As a side bar, next time you're driving the Sea to Sky highway up the Squamish/Whislter corridor look around, there is no shortage of trees.

 

 

 

 

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Ultimately folks who live nearby will have to fight it out. I'd only make one point in regards to trees.

 

Trees do add value to a location. Both trees in forested areas and those near developed structures. Either by vote or through a developers plan trees are going to have to go if the decision is to build up that area with structures. If that area is going to get developed then the best plan is to remove all the trees that are either in the middle of the location of new buildings or those that are located within striking distance of the planned structures.

 

Even if you may not need to remove a tree to build you have to consider the damage the trees could do to a new building if it were to fall. After the building goes up it's a good idea to require replanting of new trees. If done correctly the new trees will adapt to the new site better than leaving a tree but damaging the root system of that tree.

 

Views are always an issue, but you have too keep in mind that the view you want are tree covered areas in the distance. Well people live in areas where their view is towards the new structure and the bluffs. I bet they don't want to look at a bunch of ugly houses or whatever in the middle of their view. You can pick varieties of trees that look nice but still maintain views for everybody.

 

Anyway I hope somebody up their is looking over the shoulders of the developers up there and requiring them to take tree preservation into account or requiring replanting of new trees.

Edited by AlpineK

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The only economy Squamish has is real estate.

Tourists are just an annoyance causing traffic jams on the highway as residents try to get home from their day jobs in Whistler or Vancouver.

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I would say climbing is a mini-industry for a town as small as Squamish.

 

Impact-wise, does moss killing fit within the parameters of deforestation? :grlaf:

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driving the Sea to Sky highway up the Squamish/Whislter corridor look around, there is no shortage of trees.

 

Thats your argument...theres lots so dont worry about it?

 

oh wait this ones better

 

And remember that the road you are driving on required logging.

 

There are rules in life wether you are on your own property or not deal with it.

 

unless of course you want to promote a society that thinks it OK to pass idiotic bylaws that purport to fine property owners $10K/tree for unauthorized harvest.

 

yes I do!

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Sure sounds like an intolerant, narrow view of the world you've got going there Jim. Lets check back in a decade shall we once the gentrification of Squamish is complete and the quaint heritage/history of the region has been further sanitized and all those trees on the surrounding mountains have grown another few metres?

 

 

 

 

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Yeah I don't see what the big deal is, they only logged the 1/2 facing the highway anyway, is it not to expand the number of lanes? I can understand people maybe getting upset about them blasting through the Eagleridge bluffs but how many people actually went to the malamute specifically to enjoy that forest?

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Sure sounds like an intolerant, narrow view of the world you've got going there Jim. Lets check back in a decade shall we once the gentrification of Squamish is complete and the quaint heritage/history of the region has been further sanitized and all those trees on the surrounding mountains have grown another few metres?

 

why don't you pull a hemingway?

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Sure sounds like an intolerant, narrow view of the world you've got going there Jim. Lets check back in a decade shall we once the gentrification of Squamish is complete and the quaint heritage/history of the region has been further sanitized and all those trees on the surrounding mountains have grown another few metres?

Is the issue here not the hypocrisy in our society which you have so expertly hunted down with your long range sociological field glasses, but merely the fact that due process was completely ignored?

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Methinks the issues might be misplaced priorities and/or the sanctimonius attitudes of the "save the the trees" crowd. Like I said before, if folks are truely moved by the issue they can put their own money up and buy the property like the climbing community did with the access to Smoke Bluffs a number of years back.

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