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climberx

My Arm hurts!

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After a very large beer and a bit of time on google I believe I have a self diagnosis for my arm pain - Brachialis Tendonitis - Sounds like a fairly common climbing injury. Anybody else dealing with this? Suggestions?

 

How about a good Sports Med Doc and PT in North Seattle to confirm and help with the healing process.

 

Thanks!

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If you indeed have the "lateral epicondylitis" there's a good article on it in the latest climbing or rocknice mag.

 

It's a bitch to treat, but there are options. Ultrasound and an elbow chopat brace don't seem to be working very well according to the latest lit. Manipulation, Graston technique, cold laser, and nutritional supplementation along with rehab exercises the work the total wrist are the ticket. The main way to treat it is to figure out why it happened. The way you use your arm daily, overdeveloped muscles, blah blah blah are the key to keep it from happening again once the inflammation (if there is any) is down. PNF exercises exercises for the shoulder and neck are very useful if you are compensating for a problem there.

 

Good luck!

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We'll, Layton is the man for talking 'bout real stuff.

 

All I know is that the last guy who showed up here ganking and complaining on his arm hurting almost died. No kidding!

 

It's the thread under here called #$*&@ Bursitus. OLyclimber. Bursitus link

 

You might look at having it amputated before it's too late. :crosseye:

 

Hope that was some assistance. Good luck dude. Sounds like rest is needed too.

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I think I have the same thing- it hurts about mid forearm, on the top side if your palm is facing down? It doesn't stop me from climbing, it's not in the fingers (had that too) but is sore after pullups. I took 3 months off from climbing but it didn't help, although possibly because ski poling hurts it also.

 

I'm trying the exercises from Rock and Ice a few months ago, they are a little different from the usual ones you hear about for golfers elbow etc., and it seems to be helping, but it is too soon to tell. Also I'm back to climbing and it doesn't seem to be getting any worse. Good luck!

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Basically your forearm extensors are weaker than your flexors, so when they have to eccentrically contract they get overpowered and get damaged. The thing that keeps people down longer is for some reason the neurological aspect of the pain cycle gets re-wired and it can hurt even w/o inflammation or tearing.

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Layton - Thanks for the info. Doesn't the cold laser help with the neurological aspects? Any suggestions on exercises?

 

 

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I'm trying the exercises from Rock and Ice a few months ago, they are a little different from the usual ones you hear about for golfers elbow etc., and it seems to be helping,

 

Can someone describe these or post a link maybe?

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The only way to tell if it is Brachialis Tendentious is to activate that exact muscle. Pronate you palm downwards (toward the body) and then proceed to flex your arm at the elbow with a little resistance. If that hurts, then its probably what you think. You could, as Layton says, have lateral epicondylitus. In either case you need to see a hand therapist. Its a bitch of an injury (any tendon injury is) and the only way for it to heal is to keep moving it through a full range of motion without over-stressing it. If you can improve the circulation to the area through movement, then adding ice alternated with heat and rest, healing can be enhanced. Just be careful not to re-injure it. Every time I've had tendon problems I've just gotten frustrated and over zealous and made my healing time quadruple! Be patient.

 

Brachialis Tendentious is common in climbers. Its because we do so much "power gripping" with our hands in that pronated position and with our elbows straight (which puts the elbow flexors at a huge mechanical disadvantage). Because the Brachialis is a primary (1 joint muscle) flexor of the elbow, it can get drastically overused or over-stressed as it stabilizes the joint. Just think, it is essentially the primary muscle keeping the Humerus and Radius in line with each other so the joint doesn't dislocate anteriorly. Good luck with this.

 

Oh yes, theres a PT on here named Bruk Ballenger who knows what he's doing. He's in West Seattle, Realrehab.com.

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The only way to tell if it is Brachialis Tendentious is to activate that exact muscle. Pronate you palm downwards (toward the body) and then proceed to flex your arm at the elbow with a little resistance. If that hurts, then its probably what you think. You could, as Layton says, have lateral epicondylitus. In either case you need to see a hand therapist. Its a bitch of an injury (any tendon injury is) and the only way for it to heal is to keep moving it through a full range of motion without over-stressing it. If you can improve the circulation to the area through movement, then adding ice alternated with heat and rest, healing can be enhanced. Just be careful not to re-injure it. Every time I've had tendon problems I've just gotten frustrated and over zealous and made my healing time quadruple! Be patient.

 

Brachialis Tendentious is common in climbers. Its because we do so much "power gripping" with our hands in that pronated position and with our elbows straight (which puts the elbow flexors at a huge mechanical disadvantage). Because the Brachialis is a primary (1 joint muscle) flexor of the elbow, it can get drastically overused or over-stressed as it stabilizes the joint. Just think, it is essentially the primary muscle keeping the Humerus and Radius in line with each other so the joint doesn't dislocate anteriorly. Good luck with this.

 

Oh yes, theres a PT on here named Bruk Ballenger who knows what he's doing. He's in West Seattle, Realrehab.com.

 

Thanks for that unnecessary intellectual wanking.

 

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The article I'm using was in Rock and Ice Jan. 2007, by Julian Saunders.

The main difference seemed to be that he suggested lowering the weight and using your other hand to raise it back up. Also, he thought it was good if it aggravated the injury, and I've always stopped if something made it hurt more. So far I'm having good results.

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