Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
Dan_Miller

Rescue on Pyramid Peak

Recommended Posts

Found this today (03/28/07) on the NPS Daily Ranger Report:

I guess I'm a little surprised that we're not already discussing it.

 

North Cascades National Park, WA

Climbers Rescued From Pyramid Peak

 

On Sunday, March 25th, two climbers were rescued through the combined efforts of rangers, volunteers from Bellingham and Skagit Mountain Rescue, and personnel from Whidbey Naval Air Station. The call for help came in to the National Park Service on Friday, but the effort to extract the two men from steep and difficult terrain was hampered by a storm that dropped tremendous amounts of rain across western Washington over the weekend. The party of four men from Everett and Lynnwood set out to climb Pyramid Peak on Wednesday, March 21st. By Friday, they’d abandoned their climbing goal and attempted a shortcut descent, deviating from their ascent route. This led to trouble, as the group encountered steep terrain on the slopes above Diablo Lake. Two members made it out on their own Friday night and reported to a park ranger that they had left two other members stranded, one with a leg fracture. The reporting pair were both treated for mild hypothermia. Saturday’s efforts to reach the two men were limited by heavy rainfall and poor visibility. A helicopter flight to locate them was attempted but aborted due to visibility concerns. On Sunday, a ground team of park rangers and volunteers reached the climbers and prepared them for evacuation. Whidbey Naval Air Station search and rescue helicopter Firewood 21 hoisted Micha Berg, 22, of Lynnwood from the mountain on Sunday afternoon during a break in the weather. Rangers escorted his partner out by ground. Limited access, avalanche hazards and dangerous weather make attempts to climb the bigger peaks in the North Cascades infrequent during the winter. “It is unusual for park rangers to have a rescue this time of year,” explained Kelly Bush, park search and rescue coordinator. “Just as we see fewer backcountry travelers in the winter, resources – including rescue personnel capable of working in technical terrain under harsh conditions – are limited in the off-season . . . but it was also the winter snowpack, poor visibility and limited daylight that forced the injured and exhausted men to spend two nights in miserable weather awaiting rescue.” Bush also commented that “shortcuts” in the North Cascades often lead to trouble. [submitted by Charlie Beall, Public Affairs Officer]

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Happy Ending :tup: Everybody lives. No call for MLUs.

What route were they trying?

And how dare the NPS call it "winter" when winter ended on the 20th ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome :tup:. I echo above previous comments...and

 

Bush also commented that “shortcuts” in the North Cascades often lead to trouble.

 

sage advice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Similarly, "ski cuts" can lead to wild rides on the magic carpet.

 

"Shortcuts" and "ski cuts": Just say no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's funny that a ranger in the North Cascades is named Bush.

It'd be like having a ranger in the SW named Cactus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the analogy would be more precise if his name was Moss.

 

Glad they made it out alive. Hope the leg heals quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Actually, the analogy would be more precise if his name was Moss.

 

Or her name, in this case...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×