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Jamin

[TR] Mt. Hood south side - 3/16/2007

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I would like to see you guys do Hood with 40 pound packs in 7 1/2 hours with only 3 hours of sleep.

 

Jamin, a LOT of people do the south route (up AND down) with 20-30 lbs packs (why were ya haulin a "40" lb'er, xsept maybe for practice?) in less than 8 hours, coming from sea level, after work and a 200 mile drive, with no sleep what so ever. You'er not in good enough shape to move fast (ie "safe") enough for Lib Ridge yet man..JMO.

 

..Unless yo go solo..

 

You owe that much to any potential partner - BTW, who's own safety is dependent to some extent on your capabilities.

 

And da family don't need no more accidents to get in da news an make more stupid regs as well.

 

Just some thoughts.

 

Many strong climbers do it in 8 hours, round-trip with no sleep.

 

As far a Liberty Ridge, there have been a number of fatal accidents on LR involving very experienced climbers in the last few years. The late spring, early summer timing of this climb, dictated by snow conditions means weather is iffy. Not only do you need to be adept at snow/ice/mixed climbing, you need to be able to do it with a heavy pack at high (by cont. US standards) altitude, as well as be able to judge the weather and avy conditions. I believe the recent fatalities include falls, exposure, and avalanches. Gauthier could say for sure.

Edited by ericb

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Yes, but Winter, obviously he still doesn't get it. His post from NWHikers even more clearly shows that if he does not even know how to self-arrest, then why should he try something like Lib. Ridge? Maybe we should try the nice-guy approach, since the scolding is not working. He is a danger to himself, which does not nearly concern me as much as he will be a danger to others if he does attempt something like Lib. Ridge.....I say keep scolding him until he gets it through his thick head that he needs to learn more from proper instructors, whether that be a friend/mentor or a guide outfit.

 

 

Ryland, as you suggest, insults and ridicule aren't as helpful as simple suggestions and carefully measured encouragement as others have offered. You could even offer to take him out and teach him a thing or two instead of just harshing on him. Easy to sit back from the keyboard and lay into him but taking time to teach one on one will have a much better impact in keeping the scene safe for all of us. Just my .02. I appreciate your contributions to the board.

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Hey, I would be interested in learning from you guys. I will probably have some time in May to go climbing so feel free to let me know if you are going somewhere then. It doesn't look like I will be doing any climbing next weekend, Kurt. I just got a new job today, and I will be working there next saturday. I will try to get down to Granite Point some other time.

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As someone mentioned, LR is littered with unqualified climbers more and more every year. .... You know, those people you pass on-route, stop 30 yards ahead, look behind you and just get that strong gut feeling that you should probably stay with them, convince them to turn around, or offer some other advice/assistance. Thank goodness most of the really dangerous people turn around on LR before they get to the PONR. Every experienced climber I know has aborted several summit attempts to help random people on the mountain -- part of what I love about mountaineering and the mountaineering community. We bitch and whine, but, in the end, I think we all help out those people on the mountain we detect are in over their heads. Just as we hope someone would help us. Part of the price of climbing these amazing mountains, I think.

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Jamin, sorry but i have a problem with

 

"I am very confident with my self-arrest skills, and I have had plenty of practice in the past 3 years that I have been snow climbing"

 

Now I have been climbing for 20 years, have climbed LR and I am not very confident with my self arrest skills. Self arrest is over rated and is extremely difficult to achieve on a steep icy slope. The area in and below the Pearly gates is littered with rime ice particles that makes the footing very unstable even with crampons. It feels like you are walking on giant particles of sugar and self arrest is not an option. I climbed to the summit on Sunday and so know the conditions. I have also seen people try to self arrest and not stop on Hood, the rest of the tale is a sad one. Also if you manage to self arrest , all you need to do is have the pick find one small boot depression, pop out and the wild ride starts all over again. How many boot prints are on the upper slope above the hogsback? Self arrest happens when you have lost control. Stay in control like climbers should. Hope this helps, have fun out there

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Hey Jamin

I'm just curious as to what was in yours and your partners packs to make them 40lbs each? I think most guys can get up that mountain with 30lbs or less. I did it in March 05 with 30lbs. with my GoLight pack and plenty of cold weather gear (17 degrees on the summit with -6 degrees windchill). Im not ragging on ya about that, just thought maybe you could rethink your gear and save a few pounds. And you mention you "ditched most of our useless gear a few hundred feet before we reached the hogsback because we were both gasping for air". What type of gear was it that you felt okay ditching and then proceeding through the most dangerous part of the climb. And if it was indeed useless, why did you pack it to begin with? Again....I'm just trying to help.

 

I know you've been asking these guys for help on expanding your knowledge of climbing, and thats great but, I just worry you will then take the knowledge and get yourself into trouble. Before someone attempts a route like LR, the south side of Hood should be a walk in the park. Go out and climb all you can on routes that you can turn around on if something goes wrong.

 

The key to staying with mountaineering for the long run is baby steps. Don't try to gain your knowledge of something out of your league until you are fully ready to handle all of the consequences at that level. Just because you said Rainier was easy and you did a winter ascent of Hood doesn't make you ready for LR. Baby steps my friend. Like others have said.....try the Kautz or Fuhrur Finger. If I recall correctly, your summit of Rainier happened under ideal weather conditions. The mountain is a different beast in foul weather.

I admire your determination and drive to strive for bigger and better things. As mountaineers, thats a healthy part of all of us. But keep it in check. Before every climb I go on I ask myself "am I fully prepared for this? Do I have the ability and resources to care for myself or my climbing partner if something goes wrong?" When I first got into mountaineering, I was all about pushing the limits first and worrying about the consequences later. Once I learned more about it and all of the potential dangers surrounding climbing, I learned to think of the consequences first. I still push the limits. But with time and baby steps I have gained the skills to keep me alive if I push to far.

 

Do a gut check Jamin. There's no hurry. Gain your experience slowing.

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Jammin, I lost a friend on LR a few years back who had more than 15 years experience climbing all over the world. He was strong climber, technically capable and very fit. I had been on WI5 and 5.10 rock route with the guy.

 

I have done the route too, it is a great climb and definitely a good goal to have. Granted it is mainly a snow climbs most years, but it still works the hell you. The good thing is that route is not going anywhere soon.

 

Just some food for thought.

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