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gruntpltleader

boots, boots, boots?

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Help!!

I finally decided to buy boots vs rent. I have heard good things about la sportiva makalu's. Any comments?

 

Also is it really worth it to buy plastic when I will be doing very few if any winter climbs and no vert ice climbing?

 

I know boots are judged very subjectivly, but a real objective comparison is what I need as like most I'm on a budget and like get most for the money!

 

 

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Might go with something with some more insulation if you plan on doing Rainier or another PNW volcano, but you shouldn't have to go with plastics if you are not doing them in winter. Just size them with two pairs of thick socks and get some super-feet and you're golden :tup: :tup:

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I like the scarpa mantas, they fit my foot right and are bomber leather. They've done me right so far :tup:

 

I stayed away from lighter boots like the trangos, et. al. because I was afraid they'd wear out too quickly, and I prefer a leather boot I can wax.

Edited by robmcdan

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If you are going to be standing in wet spring snow all day, plastics will keep your feet warm and dry. No matter how you wax'em, spring snow postholing in leather boots will give you wet feet.

 

In summer, leather boots are better.

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...and get some super-feet and you're golden

 

What gives on super-feet? Everybody talks them up so much, and I have to admit they are the only insole that I can get away with WITHOUT needing my orthodics. What makes them work so freaking well.... they basically look like anything else and I can't see the magic pixie dust applied to them to make them tick.

 

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You'll climb faster and more adeptly in leather boots, regardless of terrain. Plastic boots suck ass, and they're heavier than hell, unless you prefer that clumsy Frankenstein feeling.

 

You can stretch the temperature range of a leather boot significantly with overboots, which can be had cheap if used. I've climbed Rainier in Feb with leather tely boots and overboots.

 

If the temps dip much below about 10 F, however, plastics come into their own. So think about how much climbing you'll be doing in those temps vs higher temps to make your decision.

 

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Overboots are :ghey:. You will climb faster and more better with warm dry feet. Plastic boots are nice and rigid... if you are kicking steps all day, nothing beats a plastic boot. The lightness of leather only becomes noticeable on technical climbing. For hiking, there really is no difference.

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I must respectfully disagree with my colleague from Canuckland. There is a world of difference hiking. And, there are effective ways to waterproof leather boots nowadays. Plus, you can get leathers that are just as rigid as plastics: no difference there. Technical climbing is when I least notice the difference in weight. Now a full day of slogging on the other hand....

Edited by tvashtarkatena

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Plus, for overnight trips, it's way easier to dry out a separate inner than it is to dry out a leather boot.

 

And if you forget your pee bottle you can just piss in the shell and empty it out the door :D

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Plus, for overnight trips, it's way easier to dry out a separate inner than it is to dry out a leather boot.

 

And if you forget your pee bottle you can just piss in the shell and empty it out the door :D

 

That's really the only reason I would use a plastic boot. For day slogs it's the leathers, for multi-day with the possibility of below freezing at night (frozen boots suck to put on) it's plastics all the way.

 

Hey, gruntpltleader, you are planning on doing Rainier in a day, right? :rolleyes:

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Plus, for overnight trips, it's way easier to dry out a separate inner than it is to dry out a leather boot.

 

And if you forget your pee bottle you can just piss in the shell and empty it out the door :D

 

I usually stuff a snaffle in each boot to dry them and empty the pellets out in the morning.

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If you want the most for your money and your not in a hurry then wait for an REI garage sale. I picked up 2 pairs of koflachs degre's for $15 each. Also picked up a brand new pair of Thirty-Two snowboarding boots for $50 worn once ($250 original price). Good deals to be had there. Shit I prolly shouldnt tell world.

 

I also I have a pair of Asolo Titans I bought new, they have treated me well. They feel real comfortable and broke in very nice. They work well on the trail as well as when using crampons.

 

However, as you prolly know everyone's foot is different. I would try on many brands before buying.

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Plus, for overnight trips, it's way easier to dry out a separate inner than it is to dry out a leather boot.

 

And if you forget your pee bottle you can just piss in the shell and empty it out the door :D

 

I usually stuff a snaffle in each boot to dry them and empty the pellets out in the morning.

 

Thanks for the comments 1 Question

 

A. What the hell is a snaffle?

 

As much as I detest REI I am planning to go to the REI used gear sale this weekend. also looking at ebay after I try on a few boots for sizes.

 

Ranier won't be until next year at least. I kind of want to get the main Oregon volcanos first. 4 planned this summer and maybe a couple of day trips.

 

I am concerned about plastic boots on long approach marches IE Jefferson, Baker, and others.

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Ranier won't be until next year at least. I kind of want to get the main Oregon volcanos first. 4 planned this summer and maybe a couple of day trips.

 

I am concerned about plastic boots on long approach marches IE Jefferson, Baker, and others.

 

You should be. Wear tennies and stash them in a tree.

 

Rainier's technically easier than Jefferson.

 

 

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Finding a good fitting boot can be a challenge so going to a shop that has knowledgeable staff and good selection is important.

 

Get a good heel fit and enough room in the toe box to allow some movement of your toes with the type of socks you intend to use most.

 

Having a good shoe shop is important because they can show you how to tie your laces to adjust the boot to your foot/sock combo.

 

I had plastic double boots, but went with a leather/synthetic insulated boot. Lighter than plastic double boots and more nimble on the long approach, but not as warm at the colder temperatures.

 

 

 

 

 

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My personal experience was that I decided that Makalu's were the right boot for my first boot. They are great, but a couple of colder weather early spring climbs on Hood and I was in the market again.

 

If La Spotiva fits you well (read the great advice on finding a good shop), then I'd consider some of the next step up boots from La Spotiva. The new Nepal Evo's weigh only 4 oz more, and they seem to have this new Trango Extreme Evo Light which is both light (3 lbs) and insulated.

 

Also for lots of summer slogging in the snow, Gore-Tex lining is really pretty nice.

 

-r

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Some people mentioned Superfeet. They are a good improvement from the stock insoles.

 

I purchased a pair of SOLE insoles. They are heat moldable and I prefer them over the superfeet because of this.

 

They are $40 or about the same as superfeet so they are not cheap, but they do have a 90 day warranty. If they don't feel good send them back for a refund.

 

I like the cushyness of the insoles after a long day.

Makes a difference.

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If you're in Seattle, I'd hit up Second Ascents and Feathered Friends. The folks that work there are rad and know a lot about boots. They helped me get set up for my last pair of them. If you want plastics, you can usually get REI ex-rentals for $50 bucks. Its a good deal for an average boot.

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Some people mentioned Superfeet. They are a good improvement from the stock insoles.

 

I purchased a pair of SOLE insoles. They are heat moldable and I prefer them over the superfeet because of this.

 

They are $40 or about the same as superfeet so they are not cheap, but they do have a 90 day warranty. If they don't feel good send them back for a refund.

 

I like the cushyness of the insoles after a long day.

Makes a difference.

 

Ditto on Soles.....higher arch than superfeet, and more padding...especially in the forefoot which is nice on steep foot-pounding descents. I've found the arch is more similar to my orthotics, without eating up all the headroom. Ultimately, the best insole is the one that fits your arch the best, and this is best determined by (at a minimum) someone at a better athletic footwear store (shoes & feet, etc.). I've also brought some off-the-shelve in soles to my PT for guidance.

 

As to the thread topic, my spin is that the "quiver of one" concept isn't the best in boots. I have two primary pairs, Koflach Degres for winter and volcano slogs, and Garmont Towers for summer/alpine.

Edited by ericb

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If you're in Seattle, I'd hit up Second Ascents and Feathered Friends. The folks that work there are rad and know a lot about boots. They helped me get set up for my last pair of them. If you want plastics, you can usually get REI ex-rentals for $50 bucks. Its a good deal for an average boot.

Where is second ascents?

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A buddy of mine gave me his merrells that fit really well and fit my crampons. He only used them a couple of times. I am looking into the soles idea. I plan on picking up some nikwax to waterproof them, unless some one has a better product. I wish I did live near seattle, but the Oregon Coast is home for me. Way to far away from anything cool.(except for surfing) Thanks for all of your input.

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