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Jens

Leashes= cheating (many say)

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This year more than ever, I am hearing more and more folks from across the pond and our brethren to our north say "leashes are cheating" or "leashes are aid". We Americans seem to be a few years behind on this trend. While climbing in Europe, some of the climbers told me that newbies even start leashless even if toproping a WI2- pitch. The above statments are also applied to long big rig ice climbs, not just the mixed crag. America seems to be the last bastion of the leash and I predict in a few more years, they will be considered taboo here (even on the big rigs). The last couple of trips to the rockies, the only folks with leashed tools have been seen jumping out of cars with American license plates. I stopped using them about a year and half ago and must say it sure adds a great extra dose of excitement to ice climbing! Give it a try!

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:yawn:

 

placed a 16 cm

screw in the pillar above climbed a bodylength higher and started to

pull the bulge. Tried to highstep right over it, blew that crampon and

pulled outwards too much from the higher grip (bump-up position) of my

new X Monster tools (and I am not blaming the tool, rather my

unfamiliarity with it, first day on them) and POP, and to prove Larry

Stanier right, "Even grade 1 ice is going to seem really steep if you

fall on it". Because of the circuitous nature of the route, and my

belayer out a bit to take pictures, I plummeted 20 feet and accordianed

into the tightish rock gully below (where I suffered most of my

battering). Didn't break anything but I am plenty stiff today and

hobbling around on crutches with a sprained ankle.

 

Anyway, it was and amateur day (I was out with a buddy and not guiding)

so I shook off the shakes and rallied, hauled up two tools (my leashless

ones went to the bottom of the climb, found late on descent

 

don't forget to bring a couple extra pairs!

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As G-spot infers, to not have ice tools on some type of belay while climbing alpine or a multi-pitch route seems silly.

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This year more than ever, I am hearing more and more folks from across the pond and our brethren to our north say "leashes are cheating" or "leashes are aid". We Americans seem to be a few years behind on this trend. While climbing in Europe, some of the climbers told me that newbies even start leashless even if toproping a WI2- pitch. The above statments are also applied to long big rig ice climbs, not just the mixed crag. America seems to be the last bastion of the leash and I predict in a few more years, they will be considered taboo here (even on the big rigs). The last couple of trips to the rockies, the only folks with leashed tools have been seen jumping out of cars with American license plates. I stopped using them about a year and half ago and must say it sure adds a great extra dose of excitement to ice climbing! Give it a try!

 

 

what if you drop your tools?

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From what I've read, the Brits are even less interested in leashless than americans.

 

So far I like the idea of spring lanyards and leashless tools (although right now mine arent set up to be load bearing). I have also been thinking that maybe doing the whole quickdraw through the spike thing while placing screws on steep leashless terrain would be a good back up idea. Seems that with these precautions you can enjoy all the benefits and freedoms of leashless without introducing much additional risk.

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This year more than ever, I am hearing more and more folks from across the pond and our brethren to our north say "leashes are cheating" or "leashes are aid".

 

Funny, considering the term and practice of "French Free".

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Climb for yourself. If you prefer to go leashless, do it; don't do it just because the heard says you have to. I just got into ice climbing and want to give leashless a try because I like the idea of being able get some bloodflow in my hands. I think tethers are a good idea to avoid the whole dropping your tool to the base of the route thing.

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I like leashes and could care less what euros or canucks or yanks think about them. Jesus could show up on the icefields parkway, wielding ergos, swearing we would burn in hell for using leashes and I wouldn't switch.

 

thanks for your opinion though. :)

 

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Mike is right, it's so much easier (and more fun) to climb without leashes. Leashless is AID.

 

346068485_e0d0dde645.jpg

 

 

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I wouldn't belay a guy who climbs without leashes. I don't want to be hit by a falling ice pick.

 

With or without leashes, ice climbing is aid. It's mechanically very similar to drilling bat hooks. Whatever you wish to do to make it harder or easier, who cares? Leashes extend your endurance on steep ice, making it physically a little easier to hold on before losing your grip. Hence, they're really no different in purpose than the modern, ergonomically designed handles, or for that matter, full-shank boots and rigid crampons.

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"I wouldn't belay a guy who climbs without leashes."

 

I'm fuqing speechless at this. I'm rarely speechless, and I'm speechless.

 

Maybe you should just stay indoors altogether. It's safer there.

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I'm rarely speechless, and I'm speechless.

 

Did you have something to say? 'Cause I kind of like you in your current state.

 

 

Maybe you should just stay indoors altogether. It's safer there.

I've done plenty of dangerous stuff in the hills. You don't even know.

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"I wouldn't belay a guy who climbs without leashes."

 

I'm fuqing speechless at this. I'm rarely speechless, and I'm speechless.

 

Maybe you should just stay indoors altogether. It's safer there.

 

Hey Lord of the Sofa....I agree with my buddy, pope...ice-climbing is all one big form of aid or another anyway, so keep it leashed when you're swinging those dang deals...even if it's just a "keeper sling", so you won't drop it on your buddy or (worse yet, someone else) and cause some sort of epic when it slips away and you resort to one of those pathetic Half-Pint-"Third-Tool"-Maybe-It-Might-Save-Your-Butt-Maybe-Not-Keepsakes. Unless, of course, you, yourself are "The Third Tool".

 

Check out this contemporary and oh-so-hip leashless experience:

 

My_Dog_Crapping.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I wouldn't belay a guy who climbs without leashes. I don't want to be hit by a falling ice pick.

 

With or without leashes, ice climbing is aid. It's mechanically very similar to drilling bat hooks. Whatever you wish to do to make it harder or easier, who cares? Leashes extend your endurance on steep ice, making it physically a little easier to hold on before losing your grip. Hence, they're really no different in purpose than the modern, ergonomically designed handles, or for that matter, full-shank boots and rigid crampons.

 

You've never ice climbed, have you? So really you have no reason to give input on a subject you appear to know little about. Wow. Ice climbing=drilling bat hooks? WTF? Are you retarded?

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funny thing,, while in canada I almost got hit with a ice tool ( Cobra) he was climbing with leashes.

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[

You've never ice climbed, have you? So really you have no reason to give input on a subject you appear to know little about. Wow. Ice climbing=drilling bat hooks? WTF? Are you retarded?

 

Are you socially retarded making comments like that? Do you, Yet-Another-Anonymous-Guy-On-The-Internet, even know the climber you are disparaging? Obviously not.

I happen to know "pope" quite well and he's a well-rounded alpinist and an excellent rock climber. Obviously you don't understand his allusions. I've done plenty of time on ice and I agree with him. So, disagreeing with you makes us retarded, eh?

That's, like, so jr. high!

 

britneys%20retarded%20vote.jpg

 

Perhaps you are a little bit ronery?

 

Click the above to find out.

 

 

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You've never ice climbed, have you? So really you have no reason to give input on a subject you appear to know little about. Wow. Ice climbing=drilling bat hooks? WTF? Are you retarded?

 

Fundamentally the same thing. You creat a hole in the medium, you stick in some metal device, you use the device to pull up and support your weight. Absolutely equal. Absolutely aid. Now do you get it? Do you want me to draw you a picture? BTW, I was climbing steep ice when you were still peeing in your Pull-Ups.

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what if you drop your tools?

 

I drop mine all the time! hahhaa! :grin:

Actually, I dont anymore. The first season (getting used to them) most of the folks I climbed with dropped them from time to time-including myself. Its a rare event to see that happen now. You just learn how to be more aware, I guess.

 

I started climbing with leashes. That lasted two years. I switched to leashless and love them. I honestly wouldnt, and havent, hesitated leading with them because they are more comfortable to me. I did, however, try using some leashes a few years ago and had a hell of a time with them. I think leashes have their place. For me, its important to switch back and forth, so when I feel I need them, Im comfortable.

 

In regards to new folks learning leashless. Thats how I see it here in the midwest. Its actually rare to see someone with leashes on their tools, unless they are pushing their leading level. You can always carry a third tool if youre worried about dropping them.

 

One thing I notice when tr'ing harder routes is that I often hang more than I would if I have leashes. Mostly, because Im so pumped and dont want to drop them or have them 5+ feet above me. Unplanned falls suck! In a sense I guess leashes would be considered aid,because they might be the only thing keeping you from falling - but thats an old debate. Just fricken climb with whatever works best for you.

 

And Pope - I just watched an entire climb fall today, approx 30 min after climbing 10 feet from it. The last thing I am worried about while ice climbing is getting hit by a dropped tool. Random ice chunks are far more frequent.

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