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kcclimber3

Mt. Hood Epic...

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The question has come up as to "Why?"

Here is something I adapted to explain my 'Why'...

 

Testament of a Climber

 

I climb, because I love to;

 

Because I love the environs where mountains are found, which are invariably beautiful, and hate the environs where crowds of people are found, which are invariably ugly; because of all the television commercials, cocktail parties and assorted social posturing I thus escape; because, in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing things they hate, my climbing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion; because the mountains do not lie or cheat and cannot be bought or bribed or impressed by power, but respond only to quietude and humility and endless patience; because I suspect that men are going along this way for the last time, and I for one don’t want to waste the trip; because mercifully there are no telephones to answer while climbing; because only in the mountains can I find solitude without loneliness; because bourbon out of an old tin cup always tastes better out there; because maybe one day I will climb my Everest; and, finally, not because I regard climbing as being so terribly important but because I suspect that so many of the other concerns of men are equally unimportant…and not nearly so much fun.*Adapted from the book Trout Magic, and with all respect to it’s author, Robert Traver.

 

My deepest condolences to the James family and my continued hope that Jerry & Brian will be rescued.

 

 

 

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Seems to me that mountain climbing is an elitist activity. Expensive equipment, not having to work a regular job, time and money to travel. That said, I do respect climbers much more than NBA players.

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Seems to me that mountain climbing is an elitist activity. Expensive equipment, not having to work a regular job, time and money to travel. That said, I do respect climbers much more than NBA players.

 

nba players get to go home to a pillow top mattress when the game is over.

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Seems to me that mountain climbing is an elitist activity. Expensive equipment, not having to work a regular job, time and money to travel. That said, I do respect climbers much more than NBA players.

 

Elitist in attitude for some, but very few top climbers are in the money. Many dirtbag it, sleeping on couches, working seasonal jobs until they have enough funds for another trip...

 

In fact, when I think of money, I think of folks buying their way to the top of something via guides, which personally, would eliminate my sense of exploration and adventure.

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Seems to me that mountain climbing is an elitist activity. Expensive equipment, not having to work a regular job, time and money to travel. That said, I do respect climbers much more than NBA players.

If that's what you'd like to call it. Most of us tailor our lives, and I do mean our lives, to accomodate climbing. We have jobs (or not) that allow us to do this. We choose to live where ever it is we can live to keep us connected to our playground. We make choices so we can afford equipment that help keep us safe and climb efficiently. But more importantly we take care of ourselves. We train exhaustively so that when we do climb, not only are we fit, we go into the deal ready to take care of anything that happens to us.

 

Sometimes, nature bitch-slaps us. When that happens, we come together and take care of ourselves. And when one of our own needs help, they can count on us.

 

It's really that simple. While everyone else is complaining about all of the multitude of things there are to complain about, and wondering what should be done to 'control' this climbing thing. The rest of us will stay here and continue to climb; and when needed, we'll be happy to do anything it takes to help out anyone that needs assistance. No charge.

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Seems to me that mountain climbing is an elitist activity. Expensive equipment, not having to work a regular job, time and money to travel. That said, I do respect climbers much more than NBA players.

 

Elitist because it is expensive? You can easily get started for under $500. In the grand scheme of things that is not expensive. Could be much less depending on what you want to do, what you already have and who you know. What does a beginner polo horse cost these days? Once you have what ever equipment you need to get started, your not paying greens fees. Yes you need to replace ropes and shoes as they wear out but I'm sure that isn't as expensive as a set of racing slicks. Sure you can go to REI and drop the cash to rack up for a big wall but it is still going to cost less than a new ski boat.

Elitist because you don't have to work a regular job? Most climbers do work a regular job. Most that don't are living, by choice, in poverty. What about the ones that climb for a living? Trust me, they are working their asses off. In most cases climbing is one of the perks of the job.

If your looking for an elitist sport, please don't look here

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Elitist? LOL, I got started by writing one check to the Tacoma Mountaineers for membership and course fees. I didn't even have a pair of boots when I started and I was an Army person stationed at Fort Lewis...elite....hahahaha. I bought boots to start with, had a few old Army uniform items to wear and some ski stuff. My parents loaned me $300 to buy a pack and sleeping bag.

 

Elitist. Hahahaha.

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I totally admire this attitude. We should all be like this instead of scared behind our little desks making as much money as we can instead of living the adventures that make life worth living. I think this way of life is what draws alot of people's interest in the Mount Hood Rescue Mission and in these hikers who we don't even know...it's that Brian, Jerry and Kelly all mastered challenges that we all wish we could master or had the courage to. And, by extension, we admire not only the rescuers, but those of you who do this day in and day out. I know there is alot of skepticism here about the newbies like myself, but I really believe many of these newbies are here because they are compassionate about these climbers and feel for them and their families, just as we would be for any of you had the same fate befallen you. I enjoy hiking the mountains here in Arizona, but I've never taken it further because I've never been willing to exceed that sense of fear that comes with pushing yourself to achieve more. I'm also not in as great a shape as I'd like to be in order to push myself to that next level. You all inspire me to go that extra step and challenge myself to do more, to live better, while I still can. Thanks.

 

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what is the point of this post?.... We go into the wild because it is what we want to do. We feel alive and one with whatever we come in contact with. I love the mountains......period. I will always love the mountains and the stars that you can't see shit of when in the city. What the hell does that have to do with money. We all .....well I do anyways... head to the mountains because I like to. If you don't..... well I respect your feelings but... they are not mine.

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Couloir - your post was excellent!

 

Not sure whether this will be looked at this again by icemaster , but just in case...

 

The general public typically see's the climber who is on tv, the magazines, the movies, the news. They have flashy, shiny gear and do acrobatic type moves to awe and inspire you. Occassionally these pictures can be somewhat realistic. More than likely they are like the faces/bodies of models in the media. You are only seeing part of the truth, the rest is colored to draw your curiousity as an audience. Sadly enough, I think the media also portrays it as an activity that only rich or talented can be part of. this is the furthest from the truth. Anyone can do it -race, size, shape, ethnicity, gender, or financial status.

 

There are many forms of climbing. Not everybody hits the hardest, steepest slopes. Some people climb once a month, some nearly everyday. Risks and sacrifices are weighed according to the personality and values of the climber to decide how much energy they want to put into it.

 

Im not rich. I know very few climbers who are (though they DO exist)- Same as people who buy boats, motorcycles, or any other "expensive" hobby. I work work 60-80hrs a week for months sometimes just so I can take a trip somewhere for a week. To prepare for that I have to get out and train on top of it. I sacrifice things like a new car, or eating out regularly, new clothes, movies,etc.

 

To see how the 'average' climber lives, take a trip out to Yosemite and visit camp 4, Joshua Tree and stay at Hidden Valley campground, smith rock, Ouray, the list goes on....In my opinion those are where you will see the 'average' climber. And no, the clothing and gear are not just dirty - they are OLD and DIRTY.

 

If you dont climb already, maybe give it a shot. Like I said, you dont have to aspire to or actually climb the biggest, steepest peaks. Just climb!

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Stop moralizing about the fucking tragedy on Hood. It over, they are all dead. Its sad what happened. Stop

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Fuzzy.... this is the real story... We love the mountains and will do what ever it takes to enjoy them..,,,, I have climbing partners who have plenty and others who don't... we all get the same mountains though... love them just the same.

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Stop moralizing about the fucking tragedy on Hood. It over, they are all dead. Its sad what happened. Stop

 

Yo, kev...other than the title of the thread this really had nothing to do with hood.

 

Im beginning to think you are the one obessed with it all! :crazy:

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I think that alpine climbing is an elitist pursuit in the best sense possible. Mountains can't be bullied, bribed, flattered, deceived, enticed or coerced. The mountains could care less who you are, where you were born, what language you speak, what race you are, who your parents are, where you went to school, what kind of car you drive, and will mercilessly and repeatedly expose the gap between your true self and the self image that you've constructed to flatter your ego like nothing else. Strength, experience, determination, fitness, judgment, skill, honesty, humility, loyalty, and integrity. In every day life you can flatter yourself and pretend that you have all these traits without ever putting them to the test. Not so in the mountains.

 

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"For God could no longer be found in his traditional steeple houses. But seemed to dwell more vividly in the bare austerities of his Earth's high places"

from Ascent

 

For me, climbing serves to strip away the detritus and distractions of civilization. Only what remains half way up a challenging rock pitch, or at 3:00am on a glacier has value, and all that remains are the people important to me. Climbing centers me and provides perspective that is impossible to find while enmeshed in the incessant noise of life.

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I think that alpine climbing is an elitist pursuit in the best sense possible. Mountains can't be bullied, bribed, flattered, deceived, enticed or coerced. The mountains could care less who you are, where you were born, what language you speak, what race you are, who your parents are, where you went to school, what kind of car you drive, and will mercilessly and repeatedly expose the gap between your true self and the self image that you've constructed to flatter your ego like nothing else. Strength, experience, determination, fitness, judgment, skill, honesty, humility, loyalty, and integrity. In every day life you can flatter yourself and pretend that you have all these traits without ever putting them to the test. Not so in the mountains.

Truth.

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I think that alpine climbing is an elitist pursuit in the best sense possible. Mountains can't be bullied, bribed, flattered, deceived, enticed or coerced. The mountains could care less who you are, where you were born, what language you speak, what race you are, who your parents are, where you went to school, what kind of car you drive, and will mercilessly and repeatedly expose the gap between your true self and the self image that you've constructed to flatter your ego like nothing else. Strength, experience, determination, fitness, judgment, skill, honesty, humility, loyalty, and integrity. In every day life you can flatter yourself and pretend that you have all these traits without ever putting them to the test. Not so in the mountains.

Truth.

I'm down with everything...except for the first sentence. Specifically, "...elitest pursuit..." Unless I'm misunderstanding the context with which 'elitest' is used, I tend to think that anyone can pursue this...if they have the cojones. :brew:

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And when one of our own needs help, they can count on us.

 

and when needed, we'll be happy to do anything it takes to help out anyone that needs assistance. No charge.

And then some will go to discussion boards, drag victims through the mud and desecrate their memories. That says a lot for the 'community.' I doubt such climbers, if that's even what they can honestly call themselves, have ever done anything for any climber, much less signed up for SAR.

 

Stop flattering yourselves.

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And when one of our own needs help, they can count on us.

 

and when needed, we'll be happy to do anything it takes to help out anyone that needs assistance. No charge.

And then some will go to discussion boards, drag victims through the mud and desecrate their memories. That says a lot for the 'community.' I doubt such climbers, if that's even what they can honestly call themselves, have ever done anything for any climber, much less signed up for SAR.

 

Stop flattering yourselves.

I wasn't trying to flatter anyone. I was just speaking of myself and the people I have gotten to know and have climbed with over the last 32 years. That's all.

 

But thanks. :fahq:

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This is my first post. Since I cannot find a truly appropriate place to post this, I am posting this here. Mt. Hood brought me to cascadeclimbers.com and I am happy that I found this site. I want to thank the administrator and monitors of this site as I found it very enlightening and informative during the recent tragic event on Mt. Hood.

 

I do not climb; however, ever since I was in elementary school (30+ years ago) and a mountain climber spoke to my class about his experience climbing Mt. Everest (I believe he reached the summit) I have held a very special place in my heart for those who climb.

 

I am deeply saddened by the recent events on Mt. Hood. I came here looking for information and found much more. I found the knowledge and (in most cases) the patience of the experienced climbers very beneficial as I lurked on the Mt. Hood threads over the last several days. I wanted to comment several times, but, didn't feel my comments were appropriate for those threads. I am posting my comments here instead.

 

1st: In Regards to the Search and Rescue team, they have done a great job. They risk their lives to save others. I have heard mention that the search was a waste of tax dollars and disagree. How can anyone place a dollar amount on any person's life - Can't!! Every life is worth saving!

 

2nd: I have heard mention that the 3 of these men were foolish, irresponsible, etc and again must disagree. I wasn't there so I don't know what they did or did not do. They lived their lives to the fullest and that is to be commended. I am speculating here, I believe that they took the appropriate safety precautions, which would be no different than any of us wearing our seat belts while driving in a car. We all take risks, some are just different than others. Who am I to judge how anyone lives their life?

 

3rd: Since I did not experience what they did on that mountain, I can not speculate on what they did, did not do, or should have done - I wasn't there! I will leave the speculation to people who have the actual information, the professional search and rescue team and also to the experienced climbers who know best what they may have gone through!

 

And to the experienced climbers (Muffy_The_Wanker_Sprayer, kevbone, b-rock, iain, Ryland, Lambone, Ivan - if I missed anyone, sorry)on this site, I found much of the information that you shared with the "newbies (me too)" very valuable and I want to wish all of you the very best! It is people like you who made (make) this country great! It must be absolutely awesome to be on top of the world!

 

May all of you reach your next summit!

 

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"1st: In Regards to the Search and Rescue team, they have done a great job. They risk their lives to save others. I have heard mention that the search was a waste of tax dollars and disagree. How can anyone place a dollar amount on any person's life - Can't!! Every life is worth saving!"

 

It's easy to spend other peoples money. Let those people who want to help them pay with their own money. Or the climbers could but search and rescue insurance. Why force me to pay for people who I don't even know? Freedom (a concept climbers should understand and value) comes with the responsibility to pay your own way.

 

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