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cluck

3 Lost on Mount Hood

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Dale, your idea is essentially to drop garbage all over the mountain in the hopes that people no one has made visual contact with will find them and use them. Night time rescue is not an option.

 

The only way this idea could be acceptable is if you secured sponsorship from an Oregon brewery and anyone who finds one of these packets can exchange them for a six pack of Terminal Gravity stout or some such.

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Dear jfmctlaw,

 

I am deeply grateful for the transcription of the newsconference. Brian Hall has relatives in germany - he is our cousin - and even though my English isn't so bad, I can't understand and comprehend all the explanations first hearing them. Therefore this is a great help and it would be very nice if you can continue (I don't think this is really bothering, or is it?).

 

Again thank you all for the omnibus information!!! This helps to understand and not to abandon hope.

 

We are mourning with the James family. May he stay now on the highest ground, he ever wishes to be and may god be with him. There was so much hope ... and still we are praying for the return of Brian and his friend.

 

Carmen

Edited by Carmen Alexa

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I know it's been posted here before, but for those just joining, I have found www.oregonlive.com to be an excellent source for all the latest bulletins on the missing climbers.

 

The Oregonian must have a direct line to the Hood River Sheriff's office.

 

 

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Hey jfmctlaw-

Can you please not transcribe/quote the press conference? I don't think that is what this thread is for.

 

Thanks

 

Ok, I guess your the Moderator. I'm happy to abide whatever the rules are. Sorry for the infringement.

 

gappertimmy is the administrator/owner of this site.

 

Thanks Lammy for the info. I don't really know any of you yet.

 

I'm happy to play by the rules, but I did receive feedback from others who cannot get the live internet feeds for real time info. But hey, it's not my forum. :-)

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from the oregonian:

Searchers today plan to focus on a section of Mount Hood called the Gullies, located between Eliot and Newton Clark glaciers.

 

Are "the Gullies" the same as the North Face Gullies (one of which being their ascent route)?

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I have been reading this forum for days now and finally decided to post. It's great to all speculate, compare, criticize, and even be cruel but it would be nice if some good could come from all of this. As I read in this mornings Oregonian, finding the other two is like looking for a needle in a haystack. After living near Mt. Hood for over 17 years watching her daily changes throughout each season, and following, every year and then some, the stories of those lost on the mountain, I still cannot fathom why so many feel it is not worth a mere $5 a day to rent a Mountain Locator Unit for each person. I'm, sadly, getting the feeling that this just isn't the "macho" thing to do, but to me it would be the 'wise' thing and would certainly aid rescuers and greatly increase chances of being found for those lost, plus location can be pinpointed with much greater accuracy. It would be nice if, like Christopher Reeve who campaigned for helmets during horseback riding, if someone or better a group of someones would take this tragic opportunity to educate others about the necessity of a simple device that could quite possibly save their lives, then this death, unlike many others, won't be for naught.

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grace the something good that can come of this is for folks to shut up about how we all need personal locator beacons.

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Really a horrible idea. Just because there is a rescue going on is no excuse to be littering all over the mountain. This is exactly the problem with Hood and other popular wilderness areas. Some of us prefer going climbing to get away from the mechanized world, being firebombed from the air by military helicopters is disrespectful to the mountain and to people who chose to climb there.

 

 

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I'm happy to play by the rules, but I did receive feedback from others who cannot get the live internet feeds for real time info. But hey, it's not my forum. :-)

 

Hey gapertimmy, Lambone and all the others,

do you really find the transcription bothering? As I mentioned above, I am very grateful for that to comprehend better. I know, there are a lot of "strangers" (non climbers) like me, just picking up informations and sometimes asking questions about the rescue. I am aware that this isn't the function this thread is for. But it is a great help, therefore I beg for a little more patience ;-)

 

Thx. C.

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grace the something good that can come of this is for folks to shut up about how we all need personal locator beacons.

Or maybe refraining from flaming someone on their very first post when they express an opinion which differs from yours.

 

Welcome to cc.com!

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I have been reading this forum for days now and finally decided to post. It's great to all speculate, compare, criticize, and even be cruel but it would be nice if some good could come from all of this. As I read in this mornings Oregonian, finding the other two is like looking for a needle in a haystack. After living near Mt. Hood for over 17 years watching her daily changes throughout each season, and following, every year and then some, the stories of those lost on the mountain, I still cannot fathom why so many feel it is not worth a mere $5 a day to rent a Mountain Locator Unit for each person. I'm, sadly, getting the feeling that this just isn't the "macho" thing to do, but to me it would be the 'wise' thing and would certainly aid rescuers and greatly increase chances of being found for those lost, plus location can be pinpointed with much greater accuracy. It would be nice if, like Christopher Reeve who campaigned for helmets during horseback riding, if someone or better a group of someones would take this tragic opportunity to educate others about the necessity of a simple device that could quite possibly save their lives, then this death, unlike many others, won't be for naught.

 

Uh, Oh, standby to get your head bit off for making such a common sense suggestion.

 

 

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It would be nice if, like Christopher Reeve who campaigned for helmets during horseback riding, if someone or better a group of someones would take this tragic opportunity to educate others about the necessity of a simple device that could quite possibly save their lives, then this death, unlike many others, won't be for naught.

 

grace, with respect to your post, an MLU would not have saved Kelly James.

 

The discussion on personal locating devices is here. please go there to continue your mission in convincing all climbers that they are nescesary.

PLU thread

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from the oregonian:

Searchers today plan to focus on a section of Mount Hood called the Gullies, located between Eliot and Newton Clark glaciers.

 

Are "the Gullies" the same as the North Face Gullies (one of which being their ascent route)?

 

Lammy,

 

That was my impression. It's all part of the area of concern in trying to find them somewhere on descent. Further the Sheriff said... oops! can't say that :-)

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Hey gapertimmy, Lambone and all the others,

do you really find the transcription bothering?

Thx. C.

 

not really, but they arn't nescesary. if you can veiw this site, then you can view the live streaming broadcast at the link I posted several times. thanks

 

I don't know why gappertimmy is opposed to it.

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The rescue locater units are a bad idea and something that should not be encouraged. Part of the problem with that mountain is that people are under the impression that, "hey if something happens to me, I'll just turn on my beeper and a magic helicopter will fly in and rescue me. " This is not climbing. Climbing is risky, sometimes bad things happen. If you really feel you might need to be rescued by other people maybe you shouldn't be going up there at all? Maybe a tad bit of self-reilaince would be a good thing instead of tying to figure out new and improved ways to call in a rescue.

 

I have been reading this forum for days now and finally decided to post. It's great to all speculate, compare, criticize, and even be cruel but it would be nice if some good could come from all of this. As I read in this mornings Oregonian, finding the other two is like looking for a needle in a haystack. After living near Mt. Hood for over 17 years watching her daily changes throughout each season, and following, every year and then some, the stories of those lost on the mountain, I still cannot fathom why so many feel it is not worth a mere $5 a day to rent a Mountain Locator Unit for each person. I'm, sadly, getting the feeling that this just isn't the "macho" thing to do, but to me it would be the 'wise' thing and would certainly aid rescuers and greatly increase chances of being found for those lost, plus location can be pinpointed with much greater accuracy. It would be nice if, like Christopher Reeve who campaigned for helmets during horseback riding, if someone or better a group of someones would take this tragic opportunity to educate others about the necessity of a simple device that could quite possibly save their lives, then this death, unlike many others, won't be for naught.

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Hey gapertimmy, Lambone and all the others,

do you really find the transcription bothering?

Thx. C.

 

not really, but they arn't nescesary. if you can veiw this site, then you can view the live streaming broadcast at the link I posted several times. thanks

 

Some folks at work have computers limited by the IT types who won't allow video feeds, and not everyone has broadband connections

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if you can veiw this site, then you can view the live streaming broadcast at the link I posted several times.

 

Not necessarily true, for a variety of technical reasons. I know it's not true at my workplace.

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MLU's for every one.

 

Haveing trained to use the MLU finding system, they are not the "panic button" cure all that some seem to think they are. They send out a lot of false signals that typically need multiple readings from multiple locations to figure out where people are. Due to the weather, a MLU would probably not have made a difference in the case of the climber found today.

 

There are a number of applications where people should start carring a location system, such as driving from Seattle to Gold Beach. Sorry about the sarcasm, but we can not safety proof everything. Not having one is nothing about being Macho. I would be more concerned with a mountain full of people with them, expecting rescue at the first moment of distress.

 

Being a mountaineer is about training, skill, determination, resourcefullness and love of the mountains. We should respect the men on the mountain for that and not dishonor them with meaningless what-if's by those who don't understand who they are.

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jfmctlaw's trancscription wouldn't be quite so bothersome if he/she didn't repeat the same thing in a rapid-fire barrage clogging up the servers.

 

However, as someone else pointed out you can go to oregonlive.com and get updates as well.

 

I understand everyone's concern and desire to remain informed but please also remember that there are close friends/relatives of these climbers reading this. Save your critiques of the climbers for a different area of the board.

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It's true, I agree that I should not be doing the transcription, .... but if this was my forum I would hire or negotiate with someone to do it in real time. This website has become a valuable information tool for many people who don't live in OR or in the USA for that matter. I'm sure the traffic has gone way up on this website.

 

I would call up a court reporting service and see if they could help out donating their time to this effort. I would lock down the forum for just the news conference and simply post the tranny. I don't know of anyone else who is providing this service.

 

I apologize if i repeated info but I was just typing what I heard. I'm really a crummy typist.

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I just wanted to say that I was raised by a WWII 10th Mt. Div. vet and from the time I could walk we were trained in climbing, skiing, tracking and survival.

 

Wow. Thank you for that relevant information. You are a hero.

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Probably, when all this is said and done there will be good questions and hopefully good answers.

 

One question that is clear though is 'Why is this being run by a Sheriff's dept?' Is that dept equiped or experinced in rescue? What is the command structure? Does the volunteer MRT run the rescue or is it the sheriff. Why is there is not a professional or military rescue team in place for these kinds of responses.

 

It seems that ultimately the Air Force Pararescue team do the job, why not start with them or designate a squadron to be the point team. Why send teams of volunteers organised by a sheriffs dept to do a job that usually requires air support with highly trained medics who are practiced and trained in all terrain rescue.

 

Is the current command structure the way to go? What happens in other nations? Are there other people who question the effectiveness of this system? Can mountain rescue be handled by in a way similar to the way the coastguard service rescues people stranded at sea i.e. by professionals who are paid and insured to take risks and who are (to quote the coast guard motto) - 'always ready'.

 

 

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