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cluck

3 Lost on Mount Hood

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don't worry about it. PNW climbers, especially the regulars on this website, are generally extra surly and xenophobic. that's all. we're just afraid that the MAN will now force us to do shit we don't want to do, or make certain activities illegal b/c of the extra attention. As someone pointed out, this is becoming this year's baby jessica, and a new reason for newscasters to wear spiffy new goretex brand coats while braying on like attention starved retarded children reading obvious shit to the masses of gapers, mouth breathers, and slack-jawed yokels.

 

hope they find em tomorrow!

 

Oh, what pearls of wisdom from the destitute chiro-quack-ter-to-be.

 

Sat-phone and GPS rentals by the missing climbing team might've avoided the serious risking of lives by numerous volunteer rescuers. Then again, their calling to say "Here's where I am and I need help" may not have yielded anything given the weather the rescuers have encountered.

 

It may be a little harsh for the friends and relatives to read such but apparently there are climbers out there who think adherence to and publication of their own world-views are more important than showing some consideration for the lives risked and dollars spent picking up after you on a mountain that belongs to all of us.

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Sunday, December 17, 2006

 

 

 

The lead team of searchers left for the Mount Hood peak at 6 a.m. and hope to make the top by noon.

 

 

6 a.m.?????

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I have a couple thoughts on standard practices.

 

Regarding the question on stashing gear: it's quite common to stash gear such as approach shoes or skis, or gear you regard as overkill now that you're on the mountain and have suddenly become optimistic about a straightforward climb. Had a cache of bivouac gear and extra stove fuel been found it would have been a very negative sign. It hasn't. Hooray!

 

Snow caves: I've spent probably around 2 weeks in snow caves, trenches and igloos. As others have said, it's imperative that the top of the entrance be lower than the sleeping platform. That accomplished, it's up to your body heat to warm the place up. The larger the volume, the more energy your body will use heating the place, so unless you're quite comfortable and well supplied, try to find another way to alleviate your boredom. Apart from enlarging your cave, that is. And of course, you don't want to get your clothes any wetter than you have to. Finally, because your world is built out of water doesn't mean you have plenty to drink. For all practical purposes, you're limited by the amount of stove fuel you have. Yes, you _can_ catch drips, squeeze it from your clothing (yuck!), and melt snow with your body heat, but you can't stay ahead of dehydration.

 

I don't bring that up to discourage anyone - I'm optimistic that these well prepared climbers brought plenty of stove fuel. I just don't want anyone thinking they can count on eating snow for hydration. Oh, along those lines, when cooking and melting show in a cave, ventilate it! Carbon monoxide and all that.

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Sheriff says team should summit by 10am PT today. Team trying to get to cell phone ping location.

 

SAR built snowcave on mtn last night and communicated with C-130 so 130 could get idea of what a human/snowcave signature would look like on it's receivers.

 

Wing commander is very cautious about his comments today.

They have some information that will narrow scope of search but they are being cautious about it. It is partially due to the fact that the technology on the C-130 is top secret military stuff and they don't want to reveal what the plane can do.

 

But they do have some information that will narrow search.

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News conf notes:

 

Avy danger is high. They have to be very careful.

 

"We found some very positive things up there"

 

"Climbing teams are just summitting"

 

"In the next few hours they expect some major developements"

 

Frank James expressed profound gratitude for SAR effort. Remains very optimistic and prayful. Thanks all across US who are sending support and positive thoughts.

 

Dwight Hall took mike, Brian's Dad. He feels the past days of searching were productive in eliminating possible places where climbers could be. Recognizes what a huge effort this is and appreciates such. Remains confident in missing climbers judgment and preparation for such. He wanted to address issues of the cost of the rescue. (He began to get very emotional at this point). He says these guys were all raised to be responsible for such.

 

Frank James stepped in after Dwight and said that was all the questions they would take for now.

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a couple thoughts on standard practices.

 

Regarding the question on stashing gear: it's quite common to stash gear such as approach shoes or skis, or gear you regard as overkill now that you're on the mountain and have suddenly become optimistic about a straightforward climb. Had a cache of bivouac gear and extra stove fuel been found it would have been a very negative sign. It hasn't. Hooray!

 

Snow caves: I've spent probably around 2 weeks in snow caves, trenches and igloos. As others have said, it's imperative that the top of the entrance be lower than the sleeping platform. That accomplished, it's up to your body heat to warm the place up. The larger the volume, the more energy your body will use heating the place, so unless you're quite comfortable and well supplied, try to find another way to alleviate your boredom. Apart from enlarging your cave, that is. And of course, you don't want to get your clothes any wetter than you have to. Finally, because your world is built out of water doesn't mean you have plenty to drink. For all practical purposes, you're limited by the amount of stove fuel you have. Yes, you _can_ catch drips, squeeze it from your clothing (yuck!), and melt snow with your body heat, but you can't stay ahead of dehydration.

 

I don't bring that up to discourage anyone - I'm optimistic that these well prepared climbers brought plenty of stove fuel. I just don't want anyone thinking they can count on eating snow for hydration. Oh, along those lines, when cooking and melting show in a cave, ventilate it! Carbon monoxide and all that.

 

Excellent post, Mr. Bunch - I'm very grateful: it's been almost twenty years since I helped build a snow-cave for the first and last time, so the refresher is much appreciated - here's a web resource for others in need of same: http://www.etisurvival.com/snocv.htm

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A shape was seen in the snow last night, a 'wishbone' shape. Searches are headed for the shape now. This is the encouraging item that was spotted.

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Regarding the 'wishbone' shape.... A Fox newsreporter who is at the Mt. Hood airport where the news conference is held spoke to a person in the Sherrif's department off camera after the conference and report such on Fox.

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As I said before my brother is one of the searchers with PMR.(He was the one who was hooking the litter to the chopper that went down in 2002) He does high mountain and I believe I saw him in the press conferance this morning on his way up the mountain. I am so proud of him, and all the people who give of themselves for others, I could burst. There are things the searchers know that the press doesn't. But I believe they will find these guys and bring them home. The searchers do what they do knowing all the risks and if they should die it would be doing what they love to do. Who could ask for more?

 

Pray hard for all.

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Fox news? You mean Faux news? The same people who are well known for sensationalism and shoot first and ask questions later reporting? How about we stick with the facts and not play into this media circus that they are propogating.

 

I hope the report turns out to be true but coming from faux news I would doubt that it ends up being accurate in the end.

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I'm no fan of Fox but it's all I get here on the east coast and the reporter is standing on the tarmac at Hood River. Hopefully he can get something straight.

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Regarding the 'wishbone' shape.... A Fox newsreporter who is at the Mt. Hood airport where the news conference is held spoke to a person in the Sherrif's department off camera after the conference and report such on Fox.

 

Fox??!!! These are the same guys that reported a C-130 was dropping SAR personnel on the summit. A new twist on heli-skiing?

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During the press conference, the various officials were very optimistic. I would imagine they would have been more guarded if they thought it was a bad sign.

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The Oregonian also reported last night that 'a piece of climbing equipment' was spotted just below the summit at dusk, but has not followed up on that report.

 

I think SAR is being cautious about their reports especially after we got that report yesterday the a UH-60 spotted 2 climbers near Tie In rock.

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A 'wishbone' could possibly mean that Kelly heard the aircraft and crawled out to make the sign in the snow and then crawled back into his snowcave. It is too harsh an environment for him to stay outside his cave for more than a minute or two.

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Regarding the 'wishbone' shape.... A Fox newsreporter who is at the Mt. Hood airport where the news conference is held spoke to a person in the Sherrif's department off camera after the conference and report such on Fox.

 

Fox??!!! These are the same guys that reported a C-130 was dropping SAR personnel on the summit. A new twist on heli-skiing?

 

 

My point exactly. I wouldn't believe anything reported by these warmongering, sensationalist, assholes unless it was verified by at least two other sources. Fox news is not news...its entertainment.

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