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cluck

3 Lost on Mount Hood

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The news conference just said no climbers seen. Dam. My question is why the UH60's can't ferry up SAR to cut the climb time down. It take too long to climb up and now the crews are going down. They only made it up to 10600 on the south side so the search is by air. The C130 will fly 24-7 so comes on Bryan, Niko, and Kelley show some skin! The C130 is using infra red cameras looking for heat signatures.

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News conference:

 

C-130 can fly all night using IR. C-130 flys higher than helos b/c it needs smoother air for stable platform.

 

UH-60's operating 9k to 11k and will fly until it's too dark.

 

All searcher's are descending off mtn now. Some teams made it to about 10k. It sounds like no one summitted.

 

The 2 climber's that were spotted previously by the UH-60 are now reported to be misidentified rocks or SAR crew. It appears chopper saw the '2 climbers' and then departed the scene to refuel. Upon return to the site, the 'climbers' could not be found.

 

Tomorrow's weather should be as good or better than today.

 

Soft snow blowing around causes intermittent white out conditions. Heavy soft snow is slowing SAR climbers.

 

Choppers can not fly too close to mountain b/c of wind shear.

 

Best IR opportunity comes in early AM as other objects have cooled over night.

 

No decision made regarding terminating search after tomorrow yet, although it is harder to get volunteer resources during the work week.

 

 

 

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Great photo utah.

1) It was reported that Kelly told his family via cell that he was just below the summit. That would be JUST below the summit. We're looking at the very peak of Mt. Hood in that pic, right?

2) Which rock is Tie In Rock? Are the two people standing on it? I don't see a rock that stands out as prominent.

3) Is that point where the men are standing about as high as people go when they set out to reach the summit, or are there folks who actually try to go stand on top of the peak, risking losing their balance and falling down the apparent 80 degree drop to the right of the two men in the photo?

 

2pm seems like a little early to hold a press conference. The SAR folks haven't even had time to come down and brief. I'm trying to view the KGW stream, and it won't work. The other station requires yet another program to download to get it to work. I'd rather avoid that.

 

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Please know that family members are reading and learning a lot from your conversation. Kelly James is my brother-in-law. I'm married to his brother, Frank, and I grew up in Portland. We are hanging on and are hungry for news. Your comments fuel our hopes.

 

Thank you for your determination to rescue our loved ones. My family will never get over the outpouring of support we have received from the climbing community.

 

We are praying for the safety and success of the rescue teams.

 

God bless you!

 

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Please hold to your courage, trust in your faith...

We're making progress.....our mission your fate.

There is no wind, sleet, nor snow that could hinder us there.

Our climbers embraced by a nation of prayer.

 

We follow your message, we're zeroing in. We fought many a mountain, and this we can win.

 

Your families are strong, they know you'll return. Their eyes tell

a story that many should learn.

 

Hold your hands up to God, he will see you through......

The mountain won't win....we're coming for you.

 

The snow has been blinding, the wind and the sleet...

but our boots, and our back pack, stand ready at our feet.

 

The might of the climbers...like a troop going to war...will push

to go onward, that's a mountaineers call.

 

We will find you......Lord save you......NO MOUNTAINS TOO TALL.

 

Written by: Sunday

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yes, there is 2 men who are climbing today , and this man that made a post said "he was going NF and was not told that he and his partner could not be on mt.hood, but also stated he did not want to throw off rescue attempts... hold on guys , help is on it s way, ..........................................

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These guys are very smart. If it was me what is the thing you are tought as a kid when you get lost? Hug a tree. I hope they are obeying this because who would know more about the avalanch danger then Bryan, Niko and Kelley. Stay put and wait for the rescuers. Self rescue is just too dangerous right now and it would be what I was thinking right now. Anyone who is a mountaineer and listened to the roar of the weather and avalanches would know that it's safer to stay put than to move right now. They could have survived the storm only to be hit by the remaing built up snow.

 

What do you guys think? Am I thinking wrong or just looking for the positive?

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Carolyn and Family--

 

Hundreds if not thousands of people like me, mostly hikers and climbers, have been following the news hourly all week. We all want to hear the same thing, the sooner the better. Our hearts go out to you all. Keep the faith and, like all of us, here in New York and around the country, hope and pray for the best.

 

Doug Hynes

 

 

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I am certainly no climber just a person with questions and hoping and praying for the safe return of all 3 climbers.

 

My first question is what would be the temperature inside of the snow caves, also how long can they go without food and water or do they have the abilities to make water out of all of the snow and do they have the abilitiy to cook food up in those high altitudes

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I've been following this wonderful forum because of the search of the missing Climbers. What a great 'community' you are! I apologize in advance for coming on because I'm not a climber -- just a native Oregonian with a love for our Cascades.

 

I wanted to post to Carolyn and your family to let you know that there are so many of us outside the climbing community that are pulling for your brother, and his friends. We are also praying for you and your family and in awe of your tremendous faith! May His arms of comfort be firmly around you all during this time.

 

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The temperature in the snow cave can be above freezing due to body heat and quite comfortable. You can go for weeks without food. You can only go for about three days without water. They have plenty of water.

 

The biggest worry is where they built their snow caves. Are they in the line of avalanches? Were they subject to the winds? etc.

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Staying put and being as visible as possible would be what I would do. If they tried to move, with the instability of the surroundings, a self triggered avi would not be a fun thing right now.

 

With all of the air power up there, that's the best chance of being spotted.

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New poster here -- I am just watching for news of the hikers. From Los Angeles. Please know, especially you family members who are here/ reading -- we are also praying for you and for these guys. Never give up hope and never stop praying.

 

Bette

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Choppers can ferry searchers in even though it is Wilderness as it is an emergency (I have seen it done). Trouble is it takes much calmer conditions than you are likely to see up there this time of year to safely get close enough to the ground to put someone down.

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Tink, and whoever is out there looking. Reudis answer is spot on about the warmth of a cave. Also consider that the wind doesn't blow inside either. All that wind chill we talk about is minimal in a cave. There's another good reason to keep up hope.

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My brother is one of the searchers with PMR He does mostly the high mountain searching. He came home Monday exhausted and frustrated. We the families of the searchers pray for all.

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In a properly constructed snow cave (with the entrance at the lowest point),and not too big for the number of people in there, it can be around 40 degrees. It can remarkably comfortable, but quite humid. Snow is a good insulator to the outside air and noise, so it is also very quiet.

 

It takes a bunch of work to build one. It is easy to get wet from the snow or sweat. Either one is not good, since the humidity on the inside of the cave makes it difficult to dry anything out.

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Hi, I just want to say thank you for the information we get from your board and pass our love and support to the Hall family (Brians mum and my mum are sisters). We are relatives from Germany (nearby Darmstadt / Frankfurt) and stick the whole time to the computer to hear (and hope for good) news. It is good to learn more details about climbing to understand what is happening.

 

We hope and pray, that Brian and his friends will return soon and in good condition. We send our love, hope and support to the families at Mt. Hood and thank the rerscue team for their great effort.

 

Regards, Carmen

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The current group of SAR should be totally spent and not ready to go again at 4 am. If you left from 6000 feet then do the math 10600 minus 6000 = 4600 feet times two of vertical climbing with lots of weight. I'm sure they are completely wiped out. I wonder if a second wave of people are gearing ready to leave in 12 hours? We need a sunny blue bird day of weather tomorrow, please o please.

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The temperature in the snow cave can be above freezing due to body heat and quite comfortable. You can go for weeks without food. You can only go for about three days without water. They have plenty of water.

Have never needed one in an "emergency" but have been trained in snow trenches, snow caves, tube tents (12 feet x 6 feet diameter for 4-8 people), etc.

All of these increase survivability, you just need to get out of the winds and have something to trap heat.

Snow caves are the best. Complete protection from winds, elevated temps from body heat, probable snowmelt (drinking water) from walls and roof.

But they can stink to the high heavens.

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