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rob

Tied vs. Sewn runners

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I've seen guys wearing 8 nylon runners over the shoulder, and it didn't look comfy.

 

If you actually notice the weight difference between eight tied slings over your shoulder and eight skinny slings over your shoulder, you're way more sensitive than I am, that's for sure. Not that I'm noted for my sensitivity.

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For what it is or isn't worth I ice crag on a blend of quick draws, screamers and tied runners... you can use the tied runners for V thread material...

 

Matter of fact I rock crag (smith, etc) on quick draws and tied runners also... I'm too cheap and those skinny runners wear out to fast cry.gif

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f=m*a

 

as 'a' goes to infinity so does 'f'.

 

load is another way to say force. any stretch or knot setting in the runner decreases the 'a'. (slows the acceleration) whether the knot is significant in this is another question. but it sounds reasonable that it acts slightly like a screamer, especially if you don't tighten your knots before climbing. hmmm.. just think of the sound you tie-in figure 8 makes when you take a fall. that's it setting and effectively 'screaming'.. so to speak.

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Should I loosen all my knots before a climb so that they can all "tighten"? laugh.gif

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I've seen guys wearing 8 nylon runners over the shoulder, and it didn't look comfy.

 

If you actually notice the weight difference between eight tied slings over your shoulder and eight skinny slings over your shoulder, you're way more sensitive than I am, that's for sure. Not that I'm noted for my sensitivity.

It's a pity this is the Newbie Forum and not Spray. evils3d.gif

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I used to be too cheap to buy sewn runners, then one of my tied ones loosened up at a bad time. I still think it is a good idea to have some cordage or webbing at hand if I might have to bail. In general though, sewn slings are worth the few dollars they cost.

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Should I loosen all my knots before a climb so that they can all "tighten"? laugh.gif

 

much more important is to have tails the length of your penis. a natural selection process...

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We still carry extra webbing with us for leaving behind but I've more or less stopped tieing my own runners as sewn ones are cheap and readily available. If the knot is good on the tied runner its NO different than a sewn sling except with a sewn one the connection point is generally cleaner than a knot and you are guaranteed that its good to the strength that the sling is rated, not to say a knot weakens the sling, but that you don't have to worry about checking your knots every outting.

 

As for slings over my shoulder, when I first started climbing back in the dark ages we carried almost all our slings over the shoulder, but now i climb with a mix of regular quickdraws and long runners doubled up like quickdraws on my harness. Unless a climb is known to need lots of long slings I don't usually throw any over the shoulder anymore.

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OMG.

 

It should be... "like OMG" rolleyes.gif in a valley girl voice.

 

7mm_edelweiss_dyneema.jpg

 

To bump this and keep it going. These new 7mm thin slings from edelweiss really kick ass. I didn't like them when my buddy first got them because they were so thin but after taking a lap on Half Dome and the Nose with them I became a beleiver. The thin slings were not only nice because they were so light (which is good for long routes) but they fed nicely through old pins and bolts. If you've ever done the "sling trick" where you lower from a pendulum or unweight yourself with a sling these really work great. They are so thin you can fit them in most bolts even with a few other pieces of webbing. I would say the only downside I do see is that they probably won't last as long as a thicker sling, but heck slings don't last forever anyway. I think when I get some new ones I'll upgrade to these for my next set.

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Don't count on those 7 mm slings having full strength unless they are used with a standard carabiner. Strength goes down with the radius of the hardware. Hard to say how much strength they'd have threaded through a piton, but it's gotta be plenty for rappelling off.

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They are rated at 22Kn. Good enough for me, then again the dimpled aliens are good enough for me smile.gif Every placement of gear used in climbing has a relative safety rating to it anyway. A bomber cam that would never blow doesn't keep you off the ledge your climbing above or the 7mm sling you just bought doesn't help if the pin you've run it through snaps at the head. Rock breaks, gear fails, placements fail. A micro cam tested to 6Kn doesn't matter if it pulls at 1Kn b/c of your placement. Everything is only going to be as strong as the weakest link, right? I just thought the slings were pretty cool and worked well considering I used them on just a fewwww pitches lately. I trust them just as much for regular placements and taking a fall on as I would any other sling. The only thing I wouldn't trust them on as much is wear. I'm going to go out on a limb and bet they would wear through faster than a thick 1" chunk of similar webbing and the strength is obviosly reduced with it threaded through an old angle but which is better. Your new 7mm sling through an old angle or the sun bleached mank webbing you find on nearly every pitch of half dome, tied and retied to the old angle? I'll stick with my new sling smile.gif

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