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Colin

first ascent Mt. Moffit, Entropy Wall, First Ascent

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Great stuff, I went to college with Jed for a year and knew he would eventually be doing some great stuff.

 

This looks like it should be a Piolet D'Or nominee to me (depending of course on what else gets put up this year).

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thumbs_up.gifYoung Colin has come a long way since he and I bailed on the Tooth one winter (it was my idea).

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Colin and "Jeb's" Mt. Moffit climb was given a "first honorable mention" in Climbing Magazine's 2006 Golden Piton award in the "North American Alpine" category.

 

Not that we care what those Colorado-centric tossers think, but congrats anyway Colin.

 

 

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Thanks, Doctor.

 

I was amused to see that the other day, although it's a shame that Climbing Magazine got Jed's name so horribly mixed up. How does it go from Jed Brown to "Jeb Hoffman???"

 

Bunch o' Colo-not-so-rad-o, tossers! :grin:

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The bigger shame is that this- one of the most significant new climbs accomplished in Alaska in the past 5-10 years- not to mention one of the most remote- gets relegated to "honorable mention".

 

It's probably the product of the same demographic of "experts" who, when asked why Blood from a Stone (Easton/Steck) on Mt. Dickey was not selected for a similar award reportedly replied "it's only Mt. Dickey...". :tdown:

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The bigger shame is that this- one of the most significant new climbs accomplished in Alaska in the past 5-10 years- not to mention one of the most remote- gets relegated to "honorable mention".

 

...And in the same article, how does this quote strike you?

 

"...alpine climbing is about routes, not summits."

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This just goes to show that giving awards for something as subjective as alpine climbing is a bad idea. I think Rolo Garibotti and his two partners had it right when they refused to accept a Piolet nomination for their route on Cerro Torre. It is cool to see people get recognized for their achievements, but to single out one climb as being more significant than another is pretty futile.

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...And in the same article, how does this quote strike you?

 

"...alpine climbing is about routes, not summits."

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

The fact that I fundamentally disagree with the above defacto statement trying to define alpinism for the rest of us, is a topic for a whole different discussion. In this case the lack of the summit is indeed pretty much irrelevant since they wandered past the highest snow bump 100 feet below it while trying to find the west buttress descent in a whiteout. But, that statement- which is used in an unnecessary attempt to qualify this obviously impressive climb- almost delivers the opposite effect intended since, if taken at face value, in my opinion it lowers the bar for everyone and helps give people an excuse and an opportunity to adjust their stated goals after they fail on their objectives. Summits indeed are not everything but increasingly, "new routes", or even just "ascents", are getting defined as anything one climbs until the weather got bad or the technical difficulties "ended". Back on topic...my main point is this:

 

With all due respect to Turgeon's and Menard's Denali climb, which was an outstanding and bold achievement by any measure, I just plainly and simply feel that Colin and Jed's climb was more impressive and deserving of the award, (if we even have to have such contrived and subjective awards). That's just my opinion. Although Denali has the altitude edge, the south face has been well traveled, with 4 independent routes established prior to this one, all of them with multiple repeat ascents. The Moffit route- which was the first highly technical route done on the face- also appears to have: more sustained climbing (including a 25 foot roof and tons of steep, wet rock), poorer escape possibilities, poorer rock quality, poorer bivies, higher objective hazards, a more difficult descent, and is in a very remote place. And, Jed and Colin walked out of the mountains after their climb.

So while heavy props are due to the Canadian Direct-I'm just not convinced it was "the most significant ascent done in Alaska this season".

 

 

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