Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
jmckay

Western Canada July Reports

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

 

Hot weather and rapid melting of the winter snowpack was the key factor

this week. For the most part the mountains are at least a couple of weeks

ahead of what would be normal snow amounts for this time of year . Most of

the standard rock routes are now in excellent shape with only minor

concerns about ice or snow patches on the routes or descents. Alpine snow

and ice routes are in a state of transition with rapid melting. Lots of ice

patches are beginning to show up on the lower slopes and the bergshrunds

are beginning to gape. Deep runnels have formed higher up. With the warm

overnight temperatures there has been very little crust formation and wet

snow avalanching and rockfall are a real concern. Foot penetration seems to

vary with aspect elevation and time of day. Although some routes are

possible, careful evaluation must be given to the potential for avalanche

and the lack of good protection in the transition from ice to snow. Bring

insect repellent for the lower elevations.

 

Brad White

UIAGM Mountain Guide

(Embedded image moved to file: pic29358.gif) _______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Up the East ridge and down the NW ridge yesterday. Crampons on to gain

the col at the base of the E ridge in the early morning cold (05:30).

Put crampons on again to cross the snow coulior on top of the lower

ridge. On the level shoulder traverse possible to kick steps across

several snow slopes. Crux step of the steep upper ridge is dry and snow

can be mostly avoided by playing the left side of the ridge. At about

10,500' we put crampons on. Hard work traversing the summits with

sometimes supportive and sometimes breakable crust. Best to rap the

shale step on the NW ridge right now as snow and ice complicate turning

it (if I had it to do over ...). Took crampons off at 10,560' and

scramble down to the meadows to change to running shoes for the long

walk out. One more week of summer weather should have the route in top

drawer shape.

 

Happy trails

 

Barry Blanchard, Mountain Guide

 

www.yamnuska.com

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

July 1-3, Columbia Icefields area.

 

The snow is disappearing fast.

 

On Parker's Ridge, the traditional "snow skills" area will soon be gone, and

the crevasse rescue wind scoop is fading fast.

 

The AA glacier is free of snow until just before the AA Col slope. The

bergschrund is still easy, due to the avalanche debris covering it. The left

side of the AA Col slope is now mostly scree. The tops of the gulleys that

break through to the Mt Athabasca saddle from the AA Col slope now have 2-30

cm of snow over top of ice. Short-roping down the top part of most of these

gullies is a bit risky. An easier way exists in the gulley far to climber's

left/skier's right, where travel is mostly on scree.

 

Cheers,

 

Grant Meekins

Alpine Guide

 

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went by there today. Normal route still has snow but it is going fast.

 

Marc Ledwidge

Mountain Guide

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

June 30- July 3.

Very warm all days and no freezes. Climbed Olive and St Nick on July

1st still pretty good travel up higher on glacier. Tongue of glacier

getting sloppy, thin and will soon be ice.

Over to Peyto on July 2nd. Good travel up high to Thompson pass but

getting very isothermal on slope leading down to Peyto hut. About

60-70 cm from mid slope down, which is less than I would have thought.

From below the hut the Peyto glacier will be ice the next few days.

We started on bare ice below the hut, traversed across and only were

on snow for a few hundred metres to reach the main gully.

Peter Amann

 

 

Peter Amann

Mountain Guiding

Box 1495, Jasper AB, T0E 1E0

780 852 3237

www.incentre.net/pamann

pamann@incentre.net _______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

July 2-4

Some snow patches getting up to the hut from Lake Ohara make some of the

travelling a bit easier but those are going quick. No rockfall observed.

 

Lows of +8 each night. Calm at the pass all of the days. Climbed W face of

Lefroy yesterday. A thin melt freeze crust overlying the wet snow below.

Good boot/calf steps all the way up. Hard enough in spots to warrant crampons.

No avalanche activity observed on Lefroy.

 

One party on Victoria reporting very slushy conditions with some double edged

cornices. Some avalanche activity up to size 2 on the E aspects of Victoria

observed. Cornices are starting to peel off randomely now as well.

 

Seems to be a very small window of opportunity with the warm temps. Solar

aspects breaking down almost immedietely.

 

Steve Holeczi

Alpine Guide/ Assistant Ski Guide

 

 

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on June 1-3 via the Sulphide Glacier.

 

 

 

Trail was clear until 4,000 ft. where it became snow covered – there is some pink flagging strewn about once the trail disappears but basically just continue straight uphill from where you lose the trail – caution for holes and hollow spots by buried trees etc. – until you reach the ridgecrest then just head right along the ridgecrest.

 

 

 

The glacier is still well covered but holes are beginning to open up on the main route – of the most concern hazard wise was the large slabs of snow falling off the rock slabs (known as glide slab avalanches) that loom above the traverse to the upper camps – I suggest that once you cross the last bit of exposed scree, rather than following the main track in the snow as it traverses upward, just drop down slightly (maybe a hundred feet) to a lower bench to traverse under the hazard area – there is still a fair bit if snow hanging up there so be alert no matter what way you travel.

 

 

 

Lots of people still skiing the glacier – main gulley on summit pyramid still has some snow in it – I dug out the solar toilets at both upper camps – temps where hot the whole time with no real freeze overnight – however the snow is still supportive and foot steps are only ankle deep.

 

 

 

Scott Davis

 

Mountain Guide

 

 

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Excellent conditions in the bugaboos right now. All routes on Bugaboo, Snowpatch and Crescent are dry. Pigeon has some snow on last part of west ridge and the east face/Kor route is still wet but drying fast. Howsers are in great shape. Beckey/Chouinard is mostly dry and cornice is mostly gone above east face descent. West face of North Howser is mostly dry I suspect and the Kain Route and North ridge are still mostly snow but some ice is showing through.

 

Glacier travel is still excellent and Bugaboo/ Snowpatch col is very friendly as of today. With the current temperatures, long range forecast and the fact that it only early july, the Bugaboo /Snowpatch col MAY turn into an icy, rockfall nightmare by august. I sincerely hope I am wrong.

 

Larry Stanier

Mountain Guide

 

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mountain Conditions Summary for the Rockies and Columbia Mountains, issued July 6th, 2006

 

All reports confirm generally excellent early summer conditions in the alpine. Daytime heating and some poor overnight freezes are the biggest variables in the snow and ice world at present. There have been a couple of reports of cornice failures and wet snow avalanches and lots of rockfall in the areas where snow patches are melting away in steep terrain.

 

In the Selkirks, Purcells and Rockies, alpine rock routes are in great shape. The classic ridges like Victoria, Edith Cavell, Assiniboine and Sir Donald are very climbable but cornices, snow patches and rockfall due to melt will be part of the deal for a few days yet on some features. Steep rock routes on all but the highest North faces are drying out way ahead of "normal".

 

Glaciers throughout the ranges are getting icy at low elevations and in exposed locations. With a good freeze, glacier travel is great but be aware that bridges are getting thinner and a couple of warm days with poor freezes can lead to nasty suprises. Keep the rope on and the slack down.

 

The big snow slopes and ice faces are widely variable right now. Again, with a good freeze, an early start and a good plan some snow and ice routes can be as good as they get.

A poor freeze, a late start and some fooling around could be a recipe for disaster. Please, don't even think about the big mixed routes like the A-Strain, Ice Hose and Edith Cavell North face for the foreseeable future.

 

Enjoy it while it lasts!

 

Larry Stanier

Mountain Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

West Coast Mountain Conditions Summary , issued July 6th, 2006

 

Similar to the Rockies and Interior ranges, many reports of excellent early summer conditions in the Alpine. Generally warm and sunny conditions over the past week has consolidated snow at all elevations. Shallow step kicking reported on many snow slopes.

 

Although the past few days cooler temps have allowed for some minimal overnight freezes, the forecast is for warmer temps and abundant radiation throughout the weekend. A solid freeze won't likely happen over the next few nights, however good to still have the crampons handy for those steep pitches higher in the alpine, or for the icy glacial tongues

 

Glaciers seem well covered from mid way up, but larger crevasses are definitely starting to show signs of sagging. If you have the chance, scope your glacier routes later in the day, or early in the AM where the cross lighting from the sun highlights the sags. Although coastal crevasse bridges have a reputation of being more forgiving, surprises still happen. Ensure your rope team isn't falling asleep at the switch.

 

Although there have not been any reports of cornice failures in the past week, I would keep a watchful eye on these, and avoid being underneath anything that looks like it could break off, and ruin your day, especially when the sun is cooking them. The other concern is snow on rock slabs. There are numerous places I have seen large glide release avalanches on hot days in the mid summer caused by meltwater lubricating the underside. Although you can never be guaranteed that the snow you are on is sitting on a slab, usually glide cracks on top of the slope are a giveaway.

 

Rule of thumb for being under cornices and glide slabs -

Early AM good

Late AM and PM bad

 

No reports on mosquito inventory yet, but I would assume there are a few billion larvae on the cusp of a hatch. Handkerchiefs to cover the face, and bug dope (applied well away from ropes, webbing, etc) will be useful here.

 

Happy Climbing!

Brian Gould

Mountain Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

July 2: Lake O'Hara to Abbot to Abbot Pass. Still some snow on the trail, but going fast. Generally good step kicking. Warm temperatures at the hut into the evening. Some wet, dirty slides rumbling off the E face near the hut in the evening (see July 2 picture).

 

July 3: S ridge to main summit, descent via Huber Glacier and ledges.

Poor freeze overnight with high overcast. No crampons needed until snow ridge halfway to S summit, where wet snow over ice in spots. The snow is melting back fast and the rock shelf on the Lake O'Hara side can be used in many sections all along the ridge already. We chose the snow ridge where possible though, to avoid the steep gully tops, which were still soft from the day before. The feeble crust only carried in a few sections, one of them being the Sickle, which is formed broad and easy this year (see picture "A"). Below the crust the snow was wet. We broke through the tracks from the previous day about half the time.

 

The ridge to the main summit had surprisingly few cornices and they do not pose a problem, easy to get around. However, we got to play in some vertical slush on the sections just before the summit (see picture "B").

 

The descent gully to Huber Gl. is still well connected, with a shin scraping crust just holding things together. The debris cone made it easy to get over the schrund (see picture "C"). Postholing on the glaciers below. Crevasses are starting to sag on the upper glacier, but they are easy to avoid so far.

 

Kobi Wyss

Mountain Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Up the NW Arete yesterday with Jesse Demontigny on a training mission.

 

The route was in excellent shape, dry with no snow or ice on the N face throughout the lower (crux) third. Several small snow patches still linger in shady pockets in the upper third, but these were easy to avoid or kick up.

 

As the clouds rolled in near the top, we caught up to Marco Delesalle and guest and opted to descend together. The west face ledges still looked to have a fair bit of snow covering the steep slabs, so we stayed on the arete. The start of the bolted rappel stations that avoid the downclimb of the lower half of the route is currently flagged with webbing and so is easy to spot. The low angle terraces below the rappel line still have a bit of snow and running water as does the top of the approach slope, so we kept the rope out right to the ground.

 

Despite intense-looking skies, the weather (mostly) held for us, but the monsoon and fireworks that hit as we descended may have left a fresh dusting of snow up high and on the N face, at least until the sun returns.

 

New (to me, anyway) on the approach is a Lower Trail which stays below the steep moraines at the base. If you haven't yet heard about it, it is a well built trail that splits off from the old trail 50m or so below the top of the waterfall. The melt flow is high right now, so the stream crossing was not dry or obvious, but the trail is well cairned on the north (far) side and stays just above treeline until almost underneath the Sir D-Uto col. This avoids the ascent up the lateral moraine and almost all of the steep snow side hilling, rock fall hazard and general scree bashing of the old approach. The new campsite (toilet) that's been put in beside the tarn 1/2 way along this new trail is also a much better and more durable bivy than the old meadow bivy sites.

 

Carl Johnston

ACMG Rock Guide and sometime shortroping crash test dummy

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

spent the last three days in the mountains around Whistler/Blackcomb. The trail along the Musical Bumps is 90% snow free, snow patches start around 1700m on the north aspects and 1900m (or a lot higher some places) on the south sides. Sun Cups are well formed and the snow is easy to walk on. Although there is not a lot of bare ice showing there are lots of sags on crevasses.

 

 

Dave Sarkany

Ski Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mountain Conditions Summary for the Rockies and Columbia Mountains issued July 12th, 2006

 

We are well into midsummer conditions at all elevations throughout the Rockies, Purcells and Selkirks.

 

Below treeline there is basically no snow except in old avalanche deposits. At treeline snow is very rare and only in old drifts, avalanche deposits and deep dark north facing features.

 

In the alpine snow is still plentiful above 3000m's but it very much has the feel of summer snow and has been through many melt freeze cycles. The strength of the snow in the alpine is variable. Alpinists can assume it will be strong after a cold clear night but becoming weak and staying that way with poor freezes, daytime heating or during rain events.

 

Glaciers are starting to show lots of ice at lower elevations and on sun affected aspects. Keep in mind the potential for rockfall along the margins of bare ice faces. A number of hot summers have melted away lots of old ice and started to expose perched rocks and boulders that have not seen the light of day for hundreds of years.

 

A lot of rain fell in the last couple of days but all reports indicate that the freezing level was very high and no signifigant snowfall in the alpine was reported.

 

Larry Stanier

Mountain Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did a spin up to the Columbia Icefields and back today. There is a fresh dusting of snow down to about 3300m in the Lake Louise area, and down to about 3000 m in the icefields area. Overall above 3000 m it still looks to be more old winter snow remaining but lower elevations seem drier than normal for this time of year.

 

Mark Klassen

Mountain Guide

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just back from 5 days in the Catamount/Northstar Glaciers area.

 

Weather was quite unsettled with major Thunder/Lightening/Rain storm on the

night of July 9 that finished off with a dusting of wet snow down to 8500ft.

and another rain event (sans lightening) overnight on July 12 and still

raining lightly at 8500ft. (a light dusting of snow above 9,000 ft.) when we

left on the morning of July 13th - temp was 2.0 C.

 

Snow has retreated to just above the lower tongue of the glacier so not lots

of obvious crevasses yet but snowcover is quite shallow and changing

quickly.

 

No new avalanche activity was observed even with all the rain - some places

the surface snow was deep enough and saturated enough with water to start

small sluffs but the pockets we encountered were small and isolated - most

snow was firm with ankle deep penetration - July 10th is the only night we

had freeze,.

 

It was handy to have the skis for our returns home and the soft snow made

the suncups tolerable - it is a fun area with many nice summits and a

variety of snow and rock mountaineering objectives on granite.

 

Cheers,

Scott Davis

Mountain Guide

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was at Moraine Lake today. The group size restrictions are on for Larch Valley and Consolation lake trails, so you need 6 people to go up to those areas.

 

Mark Klassen

Mountain Guide

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Climbed both the President and Vice President on July 11th, from the east, based from the Little Yoho Campground (beside the Stanley Mitchell Hut)

 

We had a great freeze overnight and travel conditions were prime with zero foot penetration in the AM and less than 10cm on the way down at around 1200.

 

The Bergshrund to access the col was well covered on the right side. Some significant rock fall was noted past and present from the melting on the climbers right (north) side of the glacier. There are some drooping cornices that threaten to fail on the right/north side of the glacier as well.

 

See photo looking up toward the col

 

Rob Owens

Ass. Alpine Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just back from Little Yoho today after sitting through 36 hours of rain. Still raining at 2 pm today. Got a brief look up at the President today and could see a dusting of fresh snow to 3000 meters.

 

Clearing on the drive east. North face of Temple was soaked but had no fresh snow on it, and I could see to the top.

 

Grant Statham

Mountain Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spent a week in the Bugaboos. BS Col still in good shape, ‘schrund still easily passed on the climber’s right. Monday was electrical and showery. With a moderate freeze on Tuesday crampons would have been nice, but steps could be kicked, and the Kain route on Bugaboo was dry. Wednesday through Friday was wet but the lower easy peaks were climbable. Soft rain soaked snow on the glaciers. The crevasses are starting to open now. Thursday night the snow level dropped to below the Bugaboo-Snowpatch Col and left 2 cm of new snow on Hound’s Tooth. From the limited views, Bugaboo, Snowpatch and Pigeon had a light dusting of snow, which should be mostly melted by now (Sunday 16th). The weather looked to be improving as we hiked out Friday.

 

 

 

Jordy Shepherd

 

ACMG/IFMGA Mountain Guide

 

 

 

 

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rain and snow of the last few days is basically gone on all aspects and at all elevations. Just about everything worth climbing is in grand shape around Lake OHara as of this afternoon, july 16th.

 

The only exception would be the west ridge of Hungabee. It still needs some more melt on the west face and upper gullies before the rockfall calms down to a dull roar.

 

Cathedral, Lefroy and Glacier peak are still mostly snow but it would be foolish to go without crampons as the ice is growing every day and the snow is sometimes freezing HARD.

 

Ringrose, Biddle west ridge and Odaray are in good shape.

The Tarrant buttress is dry enough and the glacier is icy on the voie normal.

 

Victoria is getting better and worse by the day. More rock showing along with more ice. So it goes. The North face of the North peak of Victoria looks disgustingly dangerous right now with complicated bare ice travel and seracs overhead for a long way. I can't imagine it getting better soon.

 

Lake OHara approach to Abbotts Pass is 90% dirt and rock.

Lots of room at the hut most nights.

 

Larry Stanier

Mountain Guide

 

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

Just spent the 15th and 16th climbing Athabasca and Andromeda.

 

On the 15th we climbed the silverhorn which was in great shape. The burgshrund was easy to cross and the snow was secure to climb to the top. Good Ice screws were easily dug to a few rope lengths above the 'shrund. We descended the ramp route, which had ok snow for walking in. Think about how to safely cross the ramp....there is a big drop below! Snow became moist around 11:30am.

 

On the 16th we climbed the North Bowl of Andromeda. Woke up to rain which quickly stopped. Went for the walk and found the freezing level to be at about the height of the access to the glacier. Travel was excellent on the glacier. The route was in good shape with soft snow to 2/3's of the way up and the rest of the route being on good alpine ice. The decent down the true AA col was in good shape. Good dry snow (even in the afternoon) for kicking steps down but the ice is easily available if you need the pro. If you only have one rope to rap over the 'shrund it needs to be 60m and you need to rap from the lowest possible point of rock on the climbers left. This may change with more melt out as it is a rope stretcher.

 

Have Fun!

 

Jesse de Montigny

Assistant Rock Guide

Assistant Ski Guide

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Climbed Mt. Hector on July 9 and 16.

 

A poor overnight freeze on July 8 and afternoon rain made for deep penetrations (up to 40cm in the final 300 ft. of elevation) that allowed us to summit without crampons.

 

A good overnight freeze on July 15 (ice in the puddles on the moraines) made for a 5cm boot pen up to about 10,000 ft. above this we used crampons and were just able to kick thin steps with a bit of work. The crust was 25cm thick on the snow slope leading to the summit col. Our steps from last week through the rock gullies near the summit were frozen solid.

 

The glacier still has snow right down to where you step on to it below Little Hector. A 50m long crevasse cuts the middle of the glacier perpendicular to the fall line. Last week we passed it on the left, this week on the right, with the latter having fewer sags and weak bridges.

The glacier flats at about 9500 ft. that lead up towards the initial steep snow slope had a breakable crust that stopped supporting in the afternoon so travel was easier on the scree shoulder to the west although the lower elevations were reasonable with boot penetrations of mainly10-20cm on descent.

 

Shaun King

Full Asst. Guide

_______________________________________________

These observations and opinions are those of the person who submitted them. The ACMG and its members take no responsibility for errors, omissions, or lapses in continuity. Conditions differ greatly over time and space due to the variable nature of mountain weather and terrain. Application of this information provides no guarantee of increased safety. Do not use the Mountain Conditions Report as the sole factor in planning trips or making decisions in the field.

Please check out http://acmg.ca/mcr for more information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Climbed Stanley Peak yesterday July 17th.

 

Poor freezing overnight and the melt freeze crust was braking down with sun exposure around 8AM. Was on the summit @ 9AM. Unless we get colder temperature, I highly recommend starting very early and being back down by lunchtime.

 

Approach: Both tongues of the glacier (East and West) are on bare ice and in similar condition. Upper flat part of the glacier below the North face of the mountain is covered with snow with good travel early in AM but deteriorating during the day.

 

Route: North Face, Kahl Route: First half of the route is mostly on bare ice (good glacier climbing). Other half is on snow (good steps except for the last 40m where the snow coverage is thin).

 

Descent: The best and safest way down is the long way on the NW ridge. The short cut in the snow gully is in bad condition this year. The snow is actually not going all the way down. An other party attempted to descend that way yesterday and one climber fail down and was injured seriously with head injury and possibly some broken bones. Coming back down the Kahl route is an other option if you are familiar with technical alpine descent (steep and high exposure!).

 

Other routes on the mountain: I had a look at the other routes on the north face and they are all in very bad condition with lots of rock falls and lack of good ice. You do not want even get close to those things!

 

Be safe climbing, I had enough rescue training for this year!

 

 

Remy Bernier

ACMG Rock Guide

remybernier@yahoo.com

www.myrockguide.com

Tel: 403-678-4276

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×