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Jarred_Jackman

Rainier conditions...

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So has anybody been down to Rainier in the past week? I heard most of the mountain above 12,000 is extraordinarily icy and often warrants running belays. Can anybody lend more information to this rumor?

 

thanks

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its jinxed anyways man.... the mtn. gods aren't happy.... they need human sacrifices to their crevasse alters.... let the mounties volunteer and i'll see you there next year when the pennance has been paid....

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Summited Monday. There had been new snow deposits from thundershowers on Sunday. The new snows actually made the footing a little less secure, since loose snow and crampons don't always get along well together. While going up the steps were sort of breaking out at times, and coming down required perhaps a little kicking of a step rather than just stomping down the points. The crampons were useful to have on to a lower elevation than I would have expected, due to feeling a little crispiness underneath the new snow (the sort of thing that an un-cramponed boot sole might not have stuck to or dug a large enough step while plunge-stepping to ensure a secure footing).

 

So, not so firm as your rumors were alluding to, but I could see how it would have been above about 12,500 feet or so prior to the snow. Likely it will get back to some of that firmness later, but for now, the warm temps will make it annoyingly soft on the descent. Best to try to get down earlier to avoid post holing.

 

The recent snow might also glaze up some with the warm daytime temps and clear nights, so that could influence how "icy" it feels on the climb up.

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Ditto to what MtnNut said. We summited Tues. at 11:00 AM via Emmons. Coming down was way soft. Plunge stepping from 13K all the way to Schurman. Note: We moved slowly as there was no clear route through the Bergschrund and so we traversed all the way toward DC route to gain/descend the summit.

 

On a better note: Skiing in Interglacier area still looks fun, I'm headed back there on Saturday to get more out of my one week park entry fee [smile]

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We were first up the DC on Monday, 7/8/02). The fresh powder wasn't a problem. It stayed cold (our drinking tubes all froze) and windy all the way to the Columbia Crest (8:30 am). Aluminum crampons worked great (including some excursions off the cow path). People without anti-balling plates had extensive balling as the snow warmed on the descent. My anti-balling duct tape worked OK, but I had some snow balling, people with anti-balling plates hade none. Fabulous day. I am not sure how useful this information is as every day is differrent!

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what route are you interested in?

 

we were on the Kautz last week (summit attempt Fri, came down Sat.) I believe since then it's gotten considerably warmer. Other than on the ice chute itself it's not that icy and you don't really need a running belay except for maybe a few sections (we put in a few pickets coming down), i'd be more concerned with the big BERGSCHRUND at 13,850 feet - the bridge over that may have gotten really weak with the recent warm weather.

 

Have fun and good luck!

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7/2-3/02 The Emmons-Winthrop was a great climb, very direct and then around to the right of the shrund. It was a bit icy the last 800 feet but no problems to note. Only one group of four besides us, nice and quiet. Rope up on the inter-glacier, several holes are opening up. Chilly

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Thanks for the info. We ended up just climbing the DC which I didn't really think was a bad route. I never thought I'd do it but if you get ahead of all the mule trains it's just an easy and sometimes exposed route to the summit. We slept on the summit, what a great place to spend a night. Found the big cave tunnel that goes under the crater, sometimes the ceiling is about 30' high in there. The conditions are perfect right now. I don't know about any other routes though, routes like the Wilson headwall looked pretty melted out.

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Dog route Danny summits the D.C. again. I never want to do it again I am finally burned out . Summited at 530 am conditions were perfect but enough is enuf

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Fuhrer Finger on the 14th. Great bivy sites at 9200. Some exposed crevasse issues, icy up towards top, then back to soft snow where Kautz connects. No problems with bergschrund at 13850 as detailed in prior trip report here.

Kautz descent left things to be desired. Very icy at headwall. Wound up running belay to broad ledge above cliffs where we tied ropes together and lowered party off one at a time with last rapping off ice bollards.

Running water at Camp Hazard with insanely fun glissades on the way down.

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So whats the scoop on getting a permit for the dog routes at the last minute. The rangers told us that we might as well not even try to get one tommorow morning for this weekend. What do you guys do...Dan, Pencil??

 

I know someone is thinking...just don't do the regular route. But either the Emmons or DC seem best suited to our teams skill and physical ability level.

 

Any recomendations would be great, thanks.

 

[ 07-25-2002, 11:12 AM: Message edited by: Lambone ]

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A group I'm climbing with the weekend of the 3rd is most likely going to head for the D.C. or Emmons, how hard is it to get a permit for either routes? We haven't decided on one a route so if gaining a permit for one is harder than the other we might want to take it in to consideration when chossing a route.

Thanks

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hi rock-ice

 

I know that all the "reserved permits" for the Emmons camps are gone for the Aug 3 weekend. However, there are some on a first come first serve basis. I predict though that I will snag them first...

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Get there on Wednesday night to snag permits for the weekends in the summer, they're usually all gone by Thursday morning (in my humble experience). Even then be prepared to camp on the Muir snowfield or Ingraham Flats on the DC route, or at Camp Curtis or Emmons Flats on the Emmons.

 

Caveat: if someone is actually nice to inform the ranger station of the cancellation of their climb, they might re-sell those permits.... not sure though, just speculation.

 

Mike, if you're out there, I defer to you.

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Rangers told us that reserved permits for the walk ups are gone through october...though I smell some bullshit on that one.

 

Thanks for the recomendation jules. We figured we'd have to leave Seattle at 3:00am wed night, drive back to seattle, then leave for rainier again early on friday...thats alot of freakin driving.

 

Fuck that. Sometimes I just hate national parks. We are going to the Glacier Wilderness instead.

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quote:

Originally posted by Lambone:

We are going to the Glacier Wilderness instead.

Right on, have a great time!!

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Permits for walkups are not all taken, they leave 40% free on a first come basis 24 hours before. Need to get there early. They open at 7:00. Last week we arrived at 6:00, got in line and got the very last reservation available. Others in line were just out of luck.

 

Rich

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quote:

Originally posted by RichTurley:

Permits for walkups are not all taken, they leave 40% free on a first come basis 24 hours before. Rich

But if you get there on Wednesday and say you're going up right away, and you're going to be there all weekend, you will get a permit that goes thru the weekend. And well, that means no spots at camp 24 hours before Saturday morning. That is exactly what happened to me 2 years ago. I think the 1st ranger I spoke to actually laughed in the phone when I called and said I was on my way down, how many spots are open at Schurman &/or Emmons Flats. "They've been full for the weekend since last night!" (I was calling on a Thursday).

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Exactly,

 

Rich is correct. But if you plan to depart friday morning, you have to pick up your permit early on thursday morning (24hrs before departure). Then what are you supposed to do during those 24 hrs? Drive back to Seattle for the night...what if you can only get a three day weekend...

 

It's just stupid I tell ya. [Roll Eyes] And to top it off, the ranger laughed at my fiance as well, and was very rude over the phone when all she wanted was some basic information. "Alot of people come to climb this mountain you know....next time reserve a site in April..." Fuck you tool. The park service can kiss my ass.

 

[ 07-25-2002, 10:37 PM: Message edited by: Lambone ]

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They do the same thing in NCNP. Makes it tougher for the normal guy to get a permit, but easier for the guide services, as they can just send a lackey up there a day early.

 

Don't know if that makes sense in MRNP though, since they only allow a couple of official guide services who probably get all the permits they want.

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I almost always go on a Sun/Mon this last Sun. I arrived at Muir at 430PM and the hut was COMPLETELY empty . Rangers said the area was full at Muir (not so , at all)??

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Completed Fuhrer Finger on the 16th in unusually warm weather. 48-degree overnight temp at 9200. 12:30 am start found the route stable with good cramponing. Unless temps really drop, I'd advise against trying the thumb, as it receives steady afternoon rockfall and doesn't allow much room to maneuver. The finger was in excellent shape all the way to the Kautz saddle. Very straightforward, but be sure to stay left of the first ramp onto the Nisqually or you will have to backtrack to regain the route--large crevasses prevent rejoining it higher unless you commit to the glacier there. Used occasional running belays past exposed sections, mostly due to condition of partner suffering from a little AMS. Descended the Kautz and found the upper chute full of alternately crappy plate or rock hard ice. We came down the center, but better climbing exists in the more pinnacled east side of the chute. Lowered first to a difficult picket pound-in, then to the snow apron where the second was top-roped from an ice bollard. The traverse to Hazard at the top of the first pitch is the best I've seen it, but has several overhanging blocks that look a little tenuous. With all the recent calving activity and the high temps, we exited lower. Lines fixed with 3 pickets on the lower pitch made for a quick descent to the bottom of the chute, where irregular ice gave way to knee-deep snow. Large horizontal fissures are forming on the lower chute. The 5.5 exit crack below Hazard is dangling 2 green ropes from rotting slings and is very easy. Be careful not to snag your line hauling as it get a little sharp in there. Curious why more people don't use this since it's so much quicker and safer than running up the exposed gully to camp. Late afternoon rock and ice fall swept 3/4 of the ascent route. This is a very scenic tour, and we saw no one on this route the entire day, up or down.

 

Note to permit complainers bashing the NPS. If you’re going to hump it up a tourist route, expect to get in line. Managing the hordes at Muir or Shurman seems like a no-win job and secondary to the primary responsibility of the Rangers. The turnstile methods should clue you in to the need for a little extra prep and research. Expecting to just walk up and park your tent in a smelly, noisy, overcrowded snow camp without a little headache is unreasonable. The NPS tries hard to manage those camps, but the climbing pressure there is ridiculous. When I consider some of the pinheads I’ve met on Rainier, I don’t blame them for showing a little wear from time to time.

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