Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
offwidthclimber

gumby topic...

Recommended Posts

okay, so my climbing experience has been limited to trad, sport and bouldering. the only thing close to alpine i've ever been on is some summer snowfield trompin' and glissadin' in the idaho sawtooths. and you all know that ain't alpine.

 

so, onward to my gumby alpine question...

 

my two fit and fun neighbors want to climb rainier this summer for the experience. i told them that i'm game. having no experience with glacier/big peak climbing, i took a look at RMI's web site. FUCK ME... $700+ for a summer climb?!?!? i don't know about my neighbors, but i'm not down with that sort of cash flow, or even half that for a guided summit climb.

 

in that vein... i will ask in my infinate ignorance if there is another guiding outfit on mt. rainier (i didn't think there was, but who knows...)?

 

that's all i've got for now. any tips, comments, etc. would be much appreciated. i'm a total alpine newbie/gumby and this trip with my neighbor friends sounds like it would be a pretty damn fun effort.

 

peace out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are other guide services:

 

http://www.nps.gov/mora/climb/climb.htm#guide

 

but they'll probably charge about the same.

 

Why don't you get those nice neighbors of yours to teach you the skillz? Or go get Freedom of the Hills and a willing friend and try out glacier travel, crevasse rescue, and self-arrest tactics at Paradise or the Coleman Icefall?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone with a pulse can walk up DC after spending a day practicing some fundamentals. If you're still unsure just follow RMI's cattle train to the top. Same experience minus the $700 setback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or do the Emmons instead of the DC. Either route is much more of a physical endurance test than a test of alpine skills. Learn how to do the french technique with your feet, how to keep your energy up with food and fluid, how to manage basic rope work, and then go on a weekend. You won't be alone. There are huge crevasses, but you'd pretty much have to jump in.

 

That's my two cents worth.

 

John Sharp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learned the ropes back in Montana when I lived on the East side of Glacier National Park. The only climbing gear I had back then was a vintage ice axe with a wooden shaft. The first time I climbed on snow and ice (solo)was on the Little Matterhorn in the park. I didn't know what the #@*& I was doing. It all seemed to come natural. I started cutting steps in the ice and inched my way to the top. I was scared shitless the whole time. I didn't even enjoy the wonderful view because I wanted to get down in one piece. But it was a learning experience. I started to read up on snow and ice pro, crampons, different rope types and knots. I found like minded people who loved the mountain like me for climbing partners. I guess if you don't want to drop the cash, find a mentor friend to show you the ropes. Go to the field a lot, find your limits and have plenty of fun, oh yea don't forget your shades and sunscreen. Good luck.. [big Drink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by offwidthclimber:

Thanks for the replies folks!

 

I looked at the other guide pages and holy shit! upwards of $1300 for a trip up rainier
[laf]

 

peace.

Yeah, and half the fun is making your own decisions up there, right or wrong. I wouldn't want to pay that much to be barked at. If you do some planning and training and then experience the mountain on your own terms, you are less likely to summit but if you do (or even if you don't) I think you'll get a lot more out of it. Beware on the Emmons, I've poked through a few times where I thought I would not. And then there are the gapers (both huge crevasses and the other kind of gaper which inhabits Schurman).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

offwidthclimber why not just offer Dan Larson a big bag of weed in return for him taking you guys up. he loves to climb Rainier and would probably jump at the chance to backslide and have a smokey in muir hut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll do it for $50 ea.

And a big bag o'weed and the only sight of those suckers you'll be seen from Muir are the ones walkin through our exhales at the top! [Eek!]

SnottyAntiPotSmokingScotty and Alike EatMyShorts [Moon][Moon][Moon]

 

[ 04-16-2002, 08:37 AM: Message edited by: oo9 ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seriously- If you have most of your own gear, I'll take the 3 of you up for $900. This includes basic training, rental consultation, and conditioning program advice. That is a savings of $1200. Let me know.

 

[ 04-16-2002, 09:43 AM: Message edited by: Charlie ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just run up it through Willis wall it's an easy hike though there…Just kidding

Any very good instructional video like Alpine Ice by Jeff Lowe probably will give u a great theoretical learning

How they say…,Good experience comes from bad judgment…

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

offwidth,

 

Here is a low-cost suggestion.

 

DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME BY GOING TO RANIER!!!

 

[smile]

 

If you are looking for an alpine experience, there are so many better, less crowded, cheaper, and non-guided places to go.

 

Maybe I am just a cynic, but I feel like there are so many good climbs in the cascades, that there is no really good reason to do Ranier other than being able to say "i climbed ranier".

 

It's not a bad mountain, but it has a lot going against it in my book. Especially if you are doing one of the yak routes.

 

Shawn [big Drink]

 

Here's to the flatlands....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by Dru:

offwidthclimber why not just offer Dan Larson a big bag of weed in return for him taking you guys up. he loves to climb Rainier and would probably jump at the chance to backslide and have a smokey in muir hut.

Bus leaves at 8 am tomorrow morning. Hopefully this one turns out better than the Jan. visit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, I wouldn't even mind walking up DC with Larson. At least HE doesn't suck like a lot of gapers around here. [Razz]

 

[ 04-18-2002, 07:45 AM: Message edited by: trask ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

offwidth,

 

Here is a low-cost suggestion.

 

DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME BY GOING TO RANIER!!!

 

WORD UP TO THAT! IBEX, YOU SPEEK DA TRUTH. Howzabout pickin' a rock route with a glacier approach? Doz be da sheeyat. Take any Beckey route... howzabout dem Bugaboos, dem mountains are dope...

 

Word up homey

 

LOVE, EAZY-E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im in the same boat man, Im an alpine greenhorn who would also like to go up the big hill. I doubt it would be a waste of time if I complete it but I would prefer not to break myself financially doing it(dont mind breaking myself physicall). I am only about a 5.8 climber but I have load of backpacking experience and a USMC background. Although I doubt DONT CLIMB IT was the answer you were looking for, I would also appreciate any tips. I was orginally intending to do the RMI trip and just byte the cost but have since cancelled that idea, I will be heading out to Seattle on the 11th of May and will be there until the 19th. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will need someone in your party who has some alpine experience if you are going to safely climb Mount Rainier without a guide, but if you are going to climb the Emmons or Dissapointment Cleaver they need not be technically proficient so much as they need to have had experience with party leadership, mountain weather, and routefinding (yes, even on these "dog routes" you should be able to find your way around in the event of a snow storm or whiteout). Everybody in your party should know how to self arrest, and should have practiced it with a pack on. It would be a big plus if one or two of you knew about crevasse rescue, but if you have a party of, say, five or six climbers and you read a chapter in Mountaineering the Freedom of the Hills and do what it says about glacier travel, you should be able to get somebody out of a crevasse without any great difficulty. A rockclimbing background will be of little or no benefit on either of these routes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Matt, I wouldnt even consider going up without someone that has experience. And I consider training a necessity prior to my going. Ill see what I can find out. It was suggested I contact Dan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×