Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • olyclimber

      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   02/03/18

      We have upgraded to new forum software as of late last year, and it makes everything here so much better!  It is now much easier to do pretty much anything, including write Trip Reports, sell gear, schedule climbing related events, and more. There is a new reputation system that allows for positive contributors to be recognized,  it is possible to tag content with identifiers, drag and drop in images, and it is much easier to embed multimedia content from Youtube, Vimeo, and more.  In all, the site is much more user friendly, bug free, and feature rich!   Whether you're a new user or a grizzled cascadeclimbers.com veteran, we think you'll love the new forums. Enjoy!
Sign in to follow this  
rock-ice

Rainier First Time

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone I was wondering what would be the best route to take up Rainier taking into consideration crowds, difficulty, sceanery... I know this is topic is brought up at before the start of every climbing season but I still need some help. I think there might be 4 of us total all with good experience.

Thanks. confused.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

R&I,

I would suggest Kautz Glacier Icefall. A couple ofreasons for this are - 1)Camp Hazard is the highestestablished camp on the mountain(shorter summit day)2)fewer crowds 3)fewer crevasses than DC or Emmons4)short approach(via Paradise) and did I mention thefewer crowds? It's a good route and affords you a niceposition on the mountain, unless you like to climbwith your buddies and a couple hundred of Big Lou'sclosest friends. My $.02. [big Drink]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kautz is nice, but I would also look at the Emmons route. You start out in a forest, then a meadow and then a snowfield, then either rock 3rd class or a glacier. I like the Emmons for a first time up recommendation, but the Kautz is worthy, but can get a little icy above the icefall and it can be a long slow snow slog to basecamp (dont stay at Hazard, but lower on the Turtle at the ridge).

TTT grin.gif" border="0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Kautz is good, but can be along 2 days if you aren't well acclimatized. Would also look at Gib. Ledges so long as you get on it early in the season, and the snow is in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re Camp Hazard and Kautz:Camp Hazard can be hazardous if it is warm..... If this is the case dig a bivy spot on the Turtle snofield's left side or simply camp at the base of it if you want.

It's an ok route to avoid the masses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by hollyclimber:
Camp Hazard is deadly. Don't camp there!

hgb

umm hence the name!?!?!?!?!?!

[ 03-25-2002: Message edited by: erik ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by To The Top:
Kautz is nice, but I would also look at the Emmons route. You start out in a forest, then a meadow and then a snowfield, then either rock 3rd class or a glacier.TTT
grin.gif" border="0

In my oh-so-humble opinion, the Emmons is the most boring route I've been on. It's a long slog through the trees, an interesting bit over the Interglacier and across to Camp Schurman, where you get to see you entire route spread out ahead of you. From there it's a steady, 30-degree slog meandering straight up the mountain. Nothing changes except when you look back to judge your progress against Little Tahoma. Finally you get to the bergschrund, and then the crater rim.

The best part is that you get to slog back out the white river trail, which feels 20 miles long at the end of a summit weekend.

Hike up to Camp Schurman as a practice trip, and you've seen the best of the route. Then you can go back and summit via Kautz, or DC.

YMMV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, the Emmons is really boring (unless you do it in late season when it's a route-finding nightmare).

I'm suprised no one has mentioned the Tahoma glacier, (if you have the time). I haven't done it, but it's supposed to be not too difficult, no crowd problems, and nice scenery...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by erik:

umm hence the name!?!?!?!?!?!

[ 03-25-2002: Message edited by: erik ]

i think it got it's name from a lieutenant hazard or something that tried to climb via this route a long time ago.

funny coincicence

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by gregm:

i think it got it's name from a lieutenant hazard or something that tried to climb via this route a long time ago.

funny coincicence

i was back peddling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

r&i-No matter how much Rainier is talked down in size here, it is still a big mtn. I would suggest that you do a standard route first before taking on a lesser traveled route. Knowing the standard lines provides additional margin of safety if the weather closes in or other problems develop.

I suppose that, personally, if I were going with 3 others that had not been above 10,000' I would choose a route that gave everyone the best chance of summiting.

It might be a shorter distance traveled to Hazard, but, in early season you'll probably break trail the entire way (Not that big of a deal with 4 climbers)

A good way to avoid the crowds is to go mid week or non holiday weekends. If you climb to Ingraham Flats (11,000'+) to camp you'll have more privacy than at camp Muir and you can pick between the DC or Ingraham Direct. I would also recommend taking a rest day and enjoy the mountain ambiance at elevation.

Have fun and write a tr for the rest of us to enjoy! cool.gif" border="0

Smoker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In defense of the Emmons:

I took a couple of friends up the Emmons for their first time up Rainier. They loved it and found just being on a big glaciated peak to be plenty exciting. One fellow we met on our way up declared it to be 'a wicked route'. While it was certainly not that, the 'schrund crossing did provide some spice for my friends and a feeling of great accomplishment. There are certainly more interesting routes on the mountain, but I am not sure I would want to be roped to inexperienced climbers on the Kautz route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO all the routes are fun - even on foot (vs skis).

If you live below 5kft I would recomend taking 3 days to acclimatize and to practice ice-axe arrest and your crevass rescue skills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

General Hazard Stevens and P.B. VanTrump made the first recorded ascent of Mt. Rainier in 1870. They were guided up to the snowline by a Klickitat chief named Sluiskin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kautz-

later season the chute/compression zone right next to the ice fall can give a pitch or two of tasty alpine ice. Earlier season, great glissade from Hazard all the way down to Nisqually- you can decend something like 4K feet in about 30 minutes

Make sure you have the location of the top of the chute pegged (GPS or Wands) when descending from summit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×