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dbb

Potter Climbs Delicate Arch

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Resonable, I appreciate the fact that they actually responded. thumbs_up.gif

I replied with a thank you and a commendation on his response and actions of BD. I also apologized for the "knee jerk reaction" but also stated that is was heartening that the community as a whole felt compelled to react.

 

Hi Dave

 

Thank you for your comments. We did not have any advance knowledge of this and I suspect many, if not all of us, read yesterdays morning paper with the same amount of trepidation. Certainly we would never condone or endorse such an action by anyone much less one of our sponsored climbers. We appreciate you taking the time to write us regarding this.

 

Best Regards,

 

Jeff Maudlin

The Employee Owners of Black Diamond Equipment, LTD.

 

On Tue, 9 May 2006, Dave wrote:

 

> Greetings, Just want to pass on a note that his delicate arch ascent

> was in very poor style considering the relationship we have with most

> land managers. Please do NOT consider this a win on any count. We have

> a responsibility to protect these resources and by supporting those

> that purport to have "uber" skills is one way of winning an access

> denied in many areas.

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Actions = Consequences

 

NEWS

Arches National Park Announces Climbing Closures

 

Date

May 09, 2006

 

Contacts

Laura Joss, 435-719-2201

Karen McKinlay-Jones, 435-719-2222

 

Effective May 9, 2006, under the authority of Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1, Section 1.5(a)(1), all rock climbing or similar activities on any arch or natural bridge named on the United States Geological Survey 7.5 minute topographical maps covering Arches National Park are prohibited.

In addition, slacklining in Arches National Park is prohibited. Slacklining is defined as walking on a rope or other line that is anchored between rock formations, trees, or any other natural features. Height of the rope above the ground is immaterial.

 

These closures are based upon a determination that such action is necessary for the maintenance of public health and safety, protection of environmental or scenic values, protection of natural resources and avoidance of conflict among visitor use activities.

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Actions = Consequences

 

NEWS

Arches National Park Announces Climbing Closures

 

Date

May 09, 2006

 

Contacts

Laura Joss, 435-719-2201

Karen McKinlay-Jones, 435-719-2222

 

Effective May 9, 2006, under the authority of Title 36 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1, Section 1.5(a)(1), all rock climbing or similar activities on any arch or natural bridge named on the United States Geological Survey 7.5 minute topographical maps covering Arches National Park are prohibited.

In addition, slacklining in Arches National Park is prohibited. Slacklining is defined as walking on a rope or other line that is anchored between rock formations, trees, or any other natural features. Height of the rope above the ground is immaterial.

 

These closures are based upon a determination that such action is necessary for the maintenance of public health and safety, protection of environmental or scenic values, protection of natural resources and avoidance of conflict among visitor use activities.

 

Dude, that's the same policy they had before. They just worded it to explicitly exclude rock climbing from the arches and close whatever loophole potter used.

 

oh, except the banned slacklining cry.gif

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oh, except the banned slacklining

 

 

The park recently changed its regulations to prohibit "slacklining" - a sport in which flexible nylon rope is stretched between two points, often over a steep fissure, and walked like a tightrope - after Potter slacklined the Three Gossips, another well-known rock formation in the park, Joss said.

 

Sounds like slacklining was already banned...wonder when he did the walk if people freaked out this much..in fact you would think that it woulda gained more attention since the ban came as a direct consequence to his walk where as climbing was already banned on named arches when Potter found a loop hole...

 

oh and the guy at the top of this page with the letter to BD...you have an appropriate avatar...

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oh and the guy at the top of this page with the letter to BD...you have an appropriate avatar...

 

Thanks! the_finger.gif

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It would appear that Arches National Park is adopting a new approach of "look, but don't touch" when managing visitors into the park. God forbid somebody may actually move around and through the environment in sight of others.

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It would appear that Arches National Park is adopting a new approach of "look, but don't touch" when managing visitors into the park. God forbid somebody may actually move around and through the environment in sight of others.

I agree with the look but don't touch park visitors.

 

One thing I liked about Denali was that you got to register for a unit and while in that unit, you didn't see any other people (except maybe the party on their way out). I realize that this cannot be done in a smaller park, but I think the enjoyment of going through a national park without seeing too many other folks cannot be understated.

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OK, I don't buy the communing with nature bit because of the cameras, and potter is probably doing all climbers a disservice with regards to access issues.

 

For me the larger issue is how can you compare the environmental impact of this ascent with the impact of the roads, parking lots, and visitor centers that the NPS has installed? I spent some time in Arches-it was sickening to see roads and cars everywhere in such a gorgeous and unique area. How could you pave a road and parking lots in such a setting? Are we going to talk about the environmental impact of this climb as the cars drive by in a never ending line? I know there are other beautiful areas in the desert, but Arches is still unique enough that it should have been designated wilderness. Same with Yosemite. Its silly to talk about the environmental impact climbers create when the park service has so completely degraded these areas by making them wheelchair accessible.

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OK, I don't buy the communing with nature bit because of the cameras, and potter is probably doing all climbers a disservice with regards to access issues.

 

For me the larger issue is how can you compare the environmental impact of this ascent with the impact of the roads, parking lots, and visitor centers that the NPS has installed? I spent some time in Arches-it was sickening to see roads and cars everywhere in such a gorgeous and unique area. How could you pave a road and parking lots in such a setting? Are we going to talk about the environmental impact of this climb as the cars drive by in a never ending line? I know there are other beautiful areas in the desert, but Arches is still unique enough that it should have been designated wilderness. Same with Yosemite. Its silly to talk about the environmental impact climbers create when the park service has so completely degraded these areas by making them wheelchair accessible.

YOu are right, cripples shouldn't have access.

 

As a person who once had to spend a bit of time in a chair, I am assuming you are being facetious.

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I think we should talk about the bigger issue here..slacklining I mean its totally banned..and because of Dean..how could he even get back in to the park..? climbing is still allowed all he did was get the laws re-worded..but shit it doesnt even matter how high the slack line is you cant even walk on webbing thats on the ground! madgo_ron.gif

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I'm not condoning the publicity stunt, but I dislike the idea of trying to get a guy "sacked" over this (or in trouble w/ his employer).

 

Normally I would agree with you, Mike. But in this case, Potter's job is "climbing ambassador" and he made the climb as part of his job. (Note the initial Patagonia press release.) I don't see anything wrong with arguing that an ambassador who has screwed up this badly should be sacked.

 

If a park ranger punched out a visiting Mexican climber to make a statement about illegal immigration, I also wouldn't have any problem calling for him to be fired.

 

A number of valid points have been made (and some not so valid points I might add.) What about writing Dean Potter directly to tell him what you think?

 

The offense was public and has caused public damage. The only way to repair the damage is either a public apology or a public censure.

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Myself, my shoes, my chalk bag, my HDDDVDD camera, my Hummer H3, and my flamethrower ARE Nature. You have no right to suggest that I leave Nature out of Nature!

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But in this case, Potter's job is "climbing ambassador"

 

Woa I didnt hire this guy as my climbing ambassador..I think your making a bit of a stretch there..he's a sponsored climber who needs to make money..but thats it...does he speak for you..I highly doubt it..

 

Patagonia's Alpine Ambassadors are some of the best and most highly respected climbers in the world. They’re part of our extended family, helping us to develop products , acting as spokespeople and sending us photos and essays from their worldwide adventures.

 

clearly it should be sell products but whatever

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Woa I didnt hire this guy as my climbing ambassador

neither did I. He's a sponsored athlete. Patagonia will keep him as long as he makes money for them. He's Patagonia's ambassador to the climbing world, not an ambassador for the climbing world.

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8 pages in and I finally have decided to add my $.02.

 

In the part year I have increasingly become aware of the various Patagonia ad campaigns featuring Dean Potter. Mostly the various photos of Potter slacklining.

 

Last summer in Anchorage we experienced a good ol' fashioned bolt war. It began with a young kid bolting a series of boulders to rig a slackline. This in turn progressed to include (1) a bolted slackline over Reed Creek in Hatcher Pass State Park, (2) a bolted slackline next to Eagle River in Chugach State Park and (3) a bolted slackline over 6 mile Creek in Chugach National Forest. All of these were next to established trails. The summer culminated with a series of retro bolted routes and finally the retro bolting of a popular 4 pitch 5.4 route that has been an established gear climb for over 20 years. Eventually all of the bolts mentioned above were chopped and nasty scars left all over the place.

 

While I do not put the blame on Patagonia and Potter I will say that I believe Patagonia's endorsement of Potter's activities were an incentive in spurring these young climbers into feeling a need to leave their mark and place bolts - especially In the cases of rigging bolted highlines.

 

I'm not sure what Patagonia Is trying to prove by endorsing Potter and his antics. When Patagonia sends out 1+ million catalogs with photos of Potter slack lining I cringe and wonder what will be bolted next. Regarding the free solo with cameras rolling… I can't help but wonder what Patagonia’s ulterior motives are.

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… I can't help but wonder what Patagonia’s ulterior motives are.

 

Yeah, wonder what? Hard to say really.

 

 

greatseal.jpg

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Yeah, wonder what? Hard to say really.

Funnny... but Patagonia has become a huge corporation and they're not going to release a PR and film a stunt without some sort of reasoning behind it. If Pataginia wants to use this to challenge the NPS's environmental values it's one thing. If they want to use the stunt to sell tshirts it's another.

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Funnny... but Patagonia has become a huge corporation and they're not going to release a PR and film a stunt without some sort of reasoning behind it. If Pataginia wants to use this to challenge the NPS's environmental values it's one thing. If they want to use the stunt to sell tshirts it's another.

I think you are making a big jump between a low level marketing person at patagonia and a video crew of unknown affiliation and purpose approving, and Patagonia centimillion dollar company approving. They are responsible for what their employees do that doesn't mean they approve of them, or approved on the course of action (and we don't know what they think currently). But then this thread is about logical leaps. If only things moved at message board speed.

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