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layton

Portland to Patagonia TR!

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Marcus and I flew to Patagonia yesterday for a quick romp in the hillz, and were safely home by dark.

We didn't top out b/c our cams froze solid and we didn't have enough pins to escape from the summit. We forgot goggles and the spindrift was blowing aroudn in eddy's so hard it got up under my sunglasses and sandpapered my eyeballs.

It was a snice ripping, gargoyle 'sploding, cam breakin', hand freezing, dry tooling, pin whackin', ski crashin' good time!

Patagonia Rules

 

136IMG_2105.JPG

 

136IMG_2122.JPG

 

136IMG_2120.JPG

 

136sdknlf.jpg

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looks more like ruapehu to me.

 

RIMEWAYTOHEAVENv2.JPG

 

No way Dru, he would have made the sheep restless all over the Island if he were down here.

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Aw, sandy-eyeballed goodtime fun - best thing about rime climbing: never have to sharpen your tools!

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Let the I-rock spring season begin! I say we make I-rock to PDX what Chair is to Seattle and someone tries it daily so we all know when the ice is climbable.

 

Now for the techie gearhead question for this guy (Marcus?)

136IMG_2120.JPG

 

It's about the Grivel leashless leashes you have attached to your Vipers. Two questions: 1) Are you using them with fangs and if so, did you drill a hole in the fangs to make a clip-in point? There isn't a lot room around the bolt on the fang inside the hole in pick but I am about to try to drill one.

2) Do you like the way those Grivel ones work? The reason that I ask is that Jim Nelson basically talked me out of buying them (it's a good thing he doesn't own a gear shop or anything) in lieu of tying cord to each tool and attaching to a simple chest harness made out of a double-length sling. The reasoning was that you do not have all the extra elastic cord getting in the way when you climb and if you want to climb with your hands, the attachment at chest level vs at the harness means the tools aren't dragging about five feet below you. Any thoughts?

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Doug,

 

The system I use on big alpine routes is this:

 

I use Cobras with the lockdown leash. There is a tight sewn loop on the underside of these leashes- I tie a length of 3mm cord to each leash, and then use a utility carabiner to clip them to my backpack shoulder strap, up high. While climbing, the cords are pretty much out of the way, with the 3mm cord hanging from under your wrists- totally out of your way. The only thing that can be a pain is if you have a shoulder-gear sling for the rack (gets tangled, esp. with stoppers on the rack), hence I usually don't use a gear sling on alpine mixed climbs. When I reach the anchor, I immediately clip the biner into the anchor so the tools are secure but they are totally out of my system. The other nice thing is that by having the 3mm cord tied to my leashes instead of the bottom of the tools, when it gets to walking terrain, the cords don't have to be untied, and also, having them clipped up to your pack, the length is perfect so they don't trip you and/or get wound up in the climbing rope.

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Doug,

 

The system I use on big alpine routes is this:

 

I use Cobras with the lockdown leash. There is a tight sewn loop on the underside of these leashes- I tie a length of 3mm cord to each leash, and then use a utility carabiner to clip them to my backpack shoulder strap, up high. While climbing, the cords are pretty much out of the way, with the 3mm cord hanging from under your wrists- totally out of your way. The only thing that can be a pain is if you have a shoulder-gear sling for the rack (gets tangled, esp. with stoppers on the rack), hence I usually don't use a gear sling on alpine mixed climbs. When I reach the anchor, I immediately clip the biner into the anchor so the tools are secure but they are totally out of my system. The other nice thing is that by having the 3mm cord tied to my leashes instead of the bottom of the tools, when it gets to walking terrain, the cords don't have to be untied, and also, having them clipped up to your pack, the length is perfect so they don't trip you and/or get wound up in the climbing rope.

 

Possible to see any pics of these set-ups?

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Jim Nelson basically talked me out of buying them (it's a good thing he doesn't own a gear shop or anything) in lieu of tying cord to each tool and attaching to a simple chest harness made out of a double-length sling.

 

Picture of Nelson's rig for reference:

4479JNstuieNWface.JPG

 

I agree with Jim's concern about tools banging around when not in use but any time I am not using my tools I clip them to my harness on a BD clipper.

 

In regards to your original question Marcus does climb with fangs on his vipers... he did minimal drilling until he could thread 1/2" tubular webbing through the hole. He tied a loop with this and clips in to that.

 

If you do get a spring thing or something similar put a SS swivel between your harness and the clip in point to fight twisted tentacles.

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Doug,

 

The system I use on big alpine routes is this:

 

I use Cobras with the lockdown leash. There is a tight sewn loop on the underside of these leashes- I tie a length of 3mm cord to each leash, and then use a utility carabiner to clip them to my backpack shoulder strap, up high. While climbing, the cords are pretty much out of the way, with the 3mm cord hanging from under your wrists- totally out of your way. The only thing that can be a pain is if you have a shoulder-gear sling for the rack (gets tangled, esp. with stoppers on the rack), hence I usually don't use a gear sling on alpine mixed climbs. When I reach the anchor, I immediately clip the biner into the anchor so the tools are secure but they are totally out of my system. The other nice thing is that by having the 3mm cord tied to my leashes instead of the bottom of the tools, when it gets to walking terrain, the cords don't have to be untied, and also, having them clipped up to your pack, the length is perfect so they don't trip you and/or get wound up in the climbing rope.

 

Doesn't that system suck for swapping hands though?

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Doesn't that system suck for swapping hands though?

 

Indeed it does; you're committed to a left and a right tool. Which is why I'm reading this discussion with interest... bigdrink.gif

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A large part of the reason I go leashless is to have the option to swap/match/mantle and other forms of trickery. Yeah warmer hands is nice but going leashless has always been more pumpy for me... at least in the alpine or pure ice routes. So... if I am committed to not swapping hands on tools then I want leashes... but that's me.

 

A grivel spring thing w/ a swivel attached to my harness works best for me.

 

Clip them in a clipper on your harness when not in use/climbing with your hands. Move the attachment point to the head of the axe when you need to plunge the tool.

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I use extra thick spaghetti noodles for snacking instead of the springy things, and a specter duct taped to my penis just cuz I like how it feels.

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A large part of the reason I go leashless is to have the option to swap/match/mantle and other forms of trickery. Yeah warmer hands is nice but going leashless has always been more pumpy for me... at least in the alpine or pure ice routes. So... if I am committed to not swapping hands on tools then I want leashes... but that's me.

 

I'm in the same boat- I actually just started trying leashless climbing at the crags this season- it's definitely the way to go on pure rock, but so far I find climbing pure ice leashless is spooky, especially after you pull off the rock onto the ice and have a solid pump going. Leashless is more pumpy for me so far but I think it might be that I haven't dialed shaking out and swapping tools enough yet. For the pump factor alone I plan to keep using leashes in the alpine and on pure ice for the time being. Even on the big Alaska routes I haven't found the mixed climbing hard enough that swapping tools would make a crucial difference, and I just deal with it. But I'm always looking for a better way to work, and as I try harder routes, it's good to have a new strategy... thumbs_up.gif

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and a specter duct taped to my penis just cuz I like how it feels.

 

With the way people go about waving theirs around here I don't think that's very safe advice.

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