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Choada_Boy

Rope-Solo in the Alpine?

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What's the trick, other than big cajones? I understand that a significant amount of free-soloing would have to be done, but what about the roped pitches? Self-belay off of clove-hithes? Silent-partner? Super-sick top-secret Russian beryllium uber-gadget?

 

I also get the impression that folks are using super-skinny ropes. Specifically? How? Why even bother, if the rope wouldn't hold a significant fall anyways? Is it just a "cross your fingers" type of deal?

 

An example: Babanov's ascent of the N. Face of Kangtega

Babanov solo on Kangtega

 

...or House on K7, etc.

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walter bonatti did all his badass shit solo (and in winter), mostly difficult roped aiding

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I'm hoping that this is only informational. Anyone who would be "qualified" to solo in the alpine environment shouldn't be asking such questions.

 

It's one thing to be "qualified" to climb at a certain level, and yet again another to be "qualified" to utilize a system of rope and gear management. I'd say that the latter is far more subtle, and not as intuitive as the former. The logical step for climbing at a harder level is to climb harder. Rope-soloing in the alpine is not something that is necessarily a logical step from climbing with a partner. For example, the use of skinnier ropes seems counter-intuitive. Rope-solo aid techniques may be adaptable, but they don't necessarily lend themselves to the "Light is Right" alpine edict. And, finally, I don't feel that in this case a "go figure it out for yourself" attitude is the best approach.

 

But, please, no more bullshit, as per the cc.com normality.

 

Does anyone have any valuable input? Does anyone have any personal experince with a successful rope-solo system that they have used in the alpine? How are skinny ropes employed without the risk of certain death (I've even heard of poeple climbing on 8mm statics)? Any tricked-out gear? What about rope management?

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But, please, no more bullshit, as per the cc.com normality.

 

I agree. This wasn't posted in spray, so alright already with the volleyball pics.

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fenderfour: What system do you employ for rope-soloing in the alpine?

 

As much as I appreciate your input, I'm looking for an effective technique, rather than a list of suggestions that may or may not work, or are so obvious they are not even worth stating ("you'd better be dialed" for example. No shit).

 

Sadly, this site is lacking in world class superalpinists willing to share their knowledge. I do know there are some local hardmen soloists out there lurking. Any thoughts? PM if you're shy.

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Pardon my ignorance: is Bruce Hendricks still alive?

 

Two daisy chains doesn't sound like "rope-soloing" to me. Thanks for the non-valuable input.

 

Dru: What system do you use for rope-soloing in the alpine?

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I don't solo in the alpine. I make it a point not to be a dick so that I can find partners who are willing to rope up with me.

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I do some rope solo alpine stuff and here is a couple things I have learned. (1)skinny ropes are not really worth it.....Floss is great for the light and fast school. Since you will be doing some variation on climb,rap, jug in order to progress the skinny rope handling challenges don't overcome the increase in speed. (2) self tending systems are worth it..... I use a modified GriGri. if you leave enough slack in your back up it will almost self feed. This leaves you open for a bigger fall if you tumble in an awkward position but for me not having to tend one more thing is a benifit. (3) Use a running protection system to speed things up if you are close to comfortable.... if I am somewhat comfy I will use a walking pro system where I set a picket at a slightly higher angle, and tie in to it on a short (10ish feet) line. Drive it at higher that normal angle. At the end of the line drive another, tie in, and jerk the last one out. Not real great pro but better than none. This setup has worked good in my trial falls when I attempt them. (4) After any mistake be real about the cause. If it is due to not having your head in the game turn around and go home. If it was a simple mistake then get your head in the game.

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I don't solo in the alpine. I make it a point not to be a dick so that I can find partners who are willing to rope up with me.

yelrotflmao.gifyelrotflmao.gifyelrotflmao.gif

 

i don't see how roped solo in the alpine is different from the crags- there are plenty of old threads on that topic if you care to look 'em up w/ the handy search feature

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Pardon my dickishness. It's easy to grow hyper-sensitized to the "Dru Factor" around here: posting for the sake of posting, rather than posting because you have valuable information to contribute to a discussion. See above for a number of examples. My apologies, I'm just looking for info, not pictures of ass.

 

I don't claim to be a hardman, either, just interested in technique. I'd rather get a wheel from someone instead of inventing one myself at the risk of getting mauled.

 

Why a modified gri-gri over a Silent Partner? I would be worried about reduction in strength when you drill a hole where a hole wasn't designed in. Is the weight savings/functionality worth the risk of malfunction?

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