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JoshK

BD Firstlight tent in wind

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Somebody's post about using a firstlight in the cdn rockies made me wonder just how good (or bad) these tents are in wind. I was thinking of trying mine out in the cold and moderately dry Colorado Rockies climate since there won't be any chance of rain. My concern is how it would hold up in the wind since it seems to always be windy in the mountains here.

 

Anybody try it or have any info on this?

 

thanks,

-josh

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I'd recommend shoring up, at least seam-gripping, the seams around the guyline attatchment points. Otherwise the stitching can begin to separate under wind stress over time.

Beyond that, just be careful setting it up - that's when you'll trash it!

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I did seamseal the entire tent, guypoints included. I guess the only way I will find out is if I try it...I can always do the middle of the night "I hate life" bailout to a lower elevation in the trees if the situation became desperate.

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send it back to BD if it gets destroyed. they replaced a megalite that got hammered by wind on Hood for me at no charge. thumbs_up.gif

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Somebody's post about using a firstlight in the cdn rockies made me wonder just how good (or bad) these tents are in wind. I was thinking of trying mine out in the cold and moderately dry Colorado Rockies climate since there won't be any chance of rain. My concern is how it would hold up in the wind since it seems to always be windy in the mountains here.

 

Anybody try it or have any info on this?

 

thanks,

-josh

 

I have a Lighthouse (bigger version) and used it 3 weekends ago on an overnighter in the Tatoosh. There was snow storm that night but the winds probably didn't get over 35 mph or so where we were camped. I had no problems. I've used it in the rain a few times and have never had a problem with it leaking. Its seam sealed in all the right spots.

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Hi Josh,

 

For what it's worth, I've spent two nights in the Firstlight with moderate winds (maybe gusting to 40 knots) and a lot of wind-driven rain. I'd say the tent functions about as well as one could reasonably expect. I mean, looking at the tent, it's clear that it is a compromise between weight and weatherproofness. We had a lot of condensation build up on the inside walls of the tent, and a little bit of leaking from above the vents. Wind gusts would then splatter all the condensation onto us, since the sides of the tent do not have guye points (only the four corners). Also, the wind buffeting the sides of the tent means it is hard to keep your down bag from touching the sides of the tent. This repeated about once every couple of minutes, all night. Overall I would say it was a sucky camping experience. On the other hand, we will keep using the Firstlight tent because it is about 1.5 pounds lighter than the I-Tent.

I figure it still has to be better than a bivy sack or a plastic tarp. hahaha.gif

 

YMMV. wave.gif

 

Cheers,

Steve

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Stephen, I was thinking the exact same with regard to being better than a tarp or bivy tent. I am actually looking to use mine for solo trips mostly, where the 4 1/2 lbs of my MK1XL seems a bit much. I would imagine with just one of me in the Firstlight I will have much less problems in the way of condensation and staying away from the walls.

 

Sounds like it is at least worth a shot, esp. since I know I won't encounter rain.

 

-josh

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Josh, Just a little input that may not help the solo bit. I have a partner that has one. We have used it in pretty stiff winds (50-60ish best guess) in a couple winter trips. The fly was pitched with low snoblock walls to help shield. It worked well both times, my only thought is the pita of building block walls when solo.

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We had one of these on our Blackburn trip this spring and got hit hard by a storm while at our exposed highcamp. We had sustained high winds and heavy snow for 12 solid hours. I wasn't in the Firstlight but those who were had no problems other than snow working its way under the vestibule and getting packed inbetween the vestibule and tent. I was pretty impressed with it.

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That was my trip report you are thinking about. I now have great confidence in these tents to withstand quite extreme conditions. One gust was so strong it deflected a pole down and smacked my partner in the head. It bounced right back into shape with no damage to either the tent or pole. I had the tent staked out with soft stakes buried maybe 18", had to leave 1 up there though as we beat a hasty retreat.

At times the guylines were buzzing like a swarm of angry hornets and twice on the descent the wind blew me off my feet and on my ass.

I notice the new models from BD have the side wall tie down points similiar to Bibliers so they would be even more bomb proof.

I have not seam sealed my tent.

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