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jerseyscum

upcoming guidebook

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I can't wait to buy this book...Does anybody know how many pages it's going to be? How much detail is there compared to the current edition-- which is 260 pages in fairly small format. Photos? Drawings?

 

How much is based on old book? Is Deception standard route still going to be called "class 2?" What percent of new material will be about cragging (am more interested in alpine.)

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You might be able to get more info here

 

Well, if these guys are the authors of the new guide, I'm a little concerned already... This web site is outdated? confused.gif

 

Regardless, the Olympics are wonderful range, and I'm eager to see the book. I hear it will be out this spring (via the Mountaineer's Books catalogue.)

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Well, if these guys are the authors of the new guide, I'm a little concerned already... This web site is outdated?

Sorry, I didn't mean to suggest that site would spell it out for you. You'll have to do a little digging by contacting individuals within OMR to find out specifics. Like Oly said, Bremerton John is a good source in addition to MTNEER, who somewhat infrequently posts on Cascade Climbers.

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Well, if these guys are the authors of the new guide, I'm a little concerned already... This web site is outdated?

Sorry, I didn't mean to suggest that site would spell it out for you. You'll have to do a little digging by contacting individuals within OMR to find out specifics. Like Oly said, Bremerton John is a good source in addition to MTNEER, who somewhat infrequently posts on Cascade Climbers.

 

I did do a little digging, i.e. I went directly to the publisher, which advertises the book as coming out this spring. The publisher seems to be the most reliable source.

 

I’m poking fun at a collection of guys (and gals) who are authoring this guide, but didn’t maintain the accuracy of a website that advertises the publishing date.

 

As stated, I’m excited to see (and buy) the guide. Perhaps the rescue unit could update their website and provide some accurate information for the rest of us (and not make us dig around?) It may help everyone else who is obviously eager to get the book. thumbs_up.gif

 

Don’t be a Nodder.

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Don’t be a Nodder.

 

OMG! shocked.gif Where is the Noddder?

 

I wonder if they found the Nodder somewhere up in the Queets Basin, or over in the upper Dose? Maybe the book will tell all, and be a NY-Times best seller.

 

grin.gif

 

OMG

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hmm...26% more pages than current edition. Doesn't say format size... Says it includes info on "rock climbs" as well as alpine climbs and traverses.... I wonder how much of the new information is on rock climbs vs alpine. Current edition has no "rock climbs," per se, but I suppose the local craggers will get their due.

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As previously suggested I have been involved with the new edition of the guidebook. The book will be out soon so I won't go into a lot of detail here. However, the format is larger than in the past to bring it into a standard size comparable to other recent Mountaineers publications. Some of us liked the smaller size of the previous 3 editions cause it fit into our packs easier, but this decision was not ours to make this time around. Another reason for the larger format is because there is a significant amount of new content. The basic peak/route info will be a familiar format to previous editions (though thoroughly reviewed and revised), the alpine traverse section is enhanced (particularly the Baileys), plus there is the addition of Crags and Alpine Climbs, with the latter consisting of expanded route descriptions/topos of a selection of climbs in the guide. There are also many new photos. I'm certain anyone whose as interested in the Olympic Mountains as I am will enjoy the new edition and appreciate the effort put into its creation by the committee of people involved from OMR. They're a knowledgeable and dedicated group. I commend all of them for their hard work.

 

John

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The OMR Website has the original date we expected to publish, but there was so much material and field research to deal with that the mountaineers gave us another season. The guide should be out sometime in April barring any printer disasters. Unfortunately, the webmaster wasn't part of the guidebook committee.

Yes, the craggers get their own section. There is even some bouldering.

We rely on you and your input to make the guide what it is. Please do provide appropriate information through the OMR web site: olympicmountainrescue.org

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So, I just got email from Amazon.com informing me that my new Olympics climbing guide has just shipped. Yippee!

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I picked up a copy from alp. ex. in Oly yesterday. I like the crag and alpine rock sections. Even some bouldering mentioned. This new edition will certainly bring more rock climbers to the area, as the book mentions untapped sport climbing potential.

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I like that they decided to add gps waypoints in some places, but why on earth did they use lat/lon instead of UTM? Are we supposed to sail to the top now?

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Yeah brother I'm sure people will be beating a path out to the peninsula to spend countless hours hanging in their harnesses wearing out numerous wire brushes creating another choss master piece that no one will climb. All kidding aside if I could get to Index in an hour I'd never climb at these dirty crags out this way

Edited by k.rose

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After taking hoods in the woods up there for some sport rappelling, I thought the crags on Mt. Zion had some serious potential and the setting, in a Rhododendron forest and on a south facing hillside, was idyllic. Are those in the book?

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Mt. Zion is mentioned as having huge walls, but being composed of mainly conglomerate. or sandstone/siltstone.

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