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Shaun

Avalanche Training for Backcountry?

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I am starting to find myself in the backcountry more and more. I am starting to ski and climb in areas where I feel like I need more knowledge than I have. I know that there are some clinics that have been going on, but I work swing shift, so I need to find one on a weekend. Does anyone know where to go or who to ask to get into an avalanche cource on a weekend? Any help is appreciated! Thanks

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I would check with a local college geology department, or ask some profs. They usually have a good idea or conduct lectures/classes. It may prove to be fairly in-depth as well.

Edited by L0ngpause

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There is a sticky at the top of the Freshie forum for Avalance center deals on beacons. Take a look there and you will find lots of good stuff including a link to the site where they maintain a catalog of Avy courses. I'm sure there is something that fits your schedule.

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Here is where I took my course. It was good. Part of it is in the lodge at Alpental, and part in the front- and backcountry of the ski area. Good teacher to student ratio, organized course, great instruction. Looks like they have a Level One next month.

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Some of these look like what I am looking for, except they say that "Participants should be of intermediate or advanced skiing ability on Telemark, alpine touring or snowboarding gear." I don't know if I could streatch into thinking that I could pass for being intermediate. I guess I either need to get caught up on my skiing skills, or find one not skiing spacific. I guess I should call these places and see what they say.

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Ya might wanna be a decent skier before ya venture off into borderline avi country, or anything remote to begin with.

Well I can't throw stones, I came down Rainiers Mowich face as an intermediate and got to the bottom ok.....lol

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Although not a course, I strongly recomend buying a copy of "Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain" by Bruce Temper. The book is very readable (unlike most material on the subject) and deals well with the reality of why we're out there.

 

GB

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I've taken a fair number of course on this subject. If you're REALLY serious, take the extended Canadian Avalanche Association courses. They last about 7-9 days if I recall. FULL DAYS, professional better than what the Americans are doing.

 

If you’re looking for a really kick ass, intensive, and comprehensive 2-3 course, Glenn Kessler's snow safety school through www.mountainsavvy.com is a superb. I would go so far as to say, one of the best in the NW market. He's based out of Mt. Hood/Portland.

 

I know others will argue for various other NW favorites, but Glenn is a FABULOUS instructor! Really hands on with realistic scenarios and EXCELLENT lectures. From beacons, to snow science, to planning backcountry trips. He's wants you to learn, and will challenge you to do so.

 

And no, I’m not getting any commission.

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If you're REALLY serious, take the extended Canadian Avalanche Association courses. They last about 7-9 days if I recall. FULL DAYS, professional better than what the Americans are doing.

 

...that you're aware of.

 

http://www.avalanchecourse.com/

 

I was aware of this course, and the other mentioned too, and I still stand by my opinion. And I HAVE taken some of the American Level 1 and 2 courses. The Canandians just did a better job IMO. I'm not saying the American courses are bad.

 

On a practical note, it makes sense to take a course in your region, unless you intend to ski/board/snow-mobile in the American Rockies all winter.

 

I like some of Arcteryx's clothing better too, but I'm sure someone else here will point you to the North Face, or REI, etc, etc...

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Some of these look like what I am looking for, except they say that "Participants should be of intermediate or advanced skiing ability on Telemark, alpine touring or snowboarding gear." I don't know if I could streatch into thinking that I could pass for being intermediate. I guess I either need to get caught up on my skiing skills, or find one not skiing spacific. I guess I should call these places and see what they say.

 

If you are not yet intermediate, you'd be very wise to work on your skiing ability before going into the BC. That is, if you plan on skiing or boarding in the BC.

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On a recreational level your local guides and companies are fine. On a professional level the CAA is recognized worldwide and are second to none! It really depends on what and where you are going with this info.

Edited by jmckay

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If you're REALLY serious, take the extended Canadian Avalanche Association courses. They last about 7-9 days if I recall. FULL DAYS, professional better than what the Americans are doing.

 

 

CAA?.....What were the names of those two from up there in the SouthPark movie.......?

 

Anyway, if we were going to consider CAA as something outstanding, we might as well start a high altitude institution in Jamaica, then make it a 4-20 day course, and probably still be on the same page as CAA without the snow.

 

Blow your own horn?.....Aye? rockband.gif

 

 

 

...that you're aware of.

 

http://www.avalanchecourse.com/

 

I was aware of this course, and the other mentioned too, and I still stand by my opinion. And I HAVE taken some of the American Level 1 and 2 courses. The Canandians just did a better job IMO. I'm not saying the American courses are bad.

 

On a practical note, it makes sense to take a course in your region, unless you intend to ski/board/snow-mobile in the American Rockies all winter.

 

I like some of Arcteryx's clothing better too, but I'm sure someone else here will point you to the North Face, or REI, etc, etc...

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I was aware of this course, and the other mentioned too, and I still stand by my opinion. And I HAVE taken some of the American Level 1 and 2 courses. The Canandians just did a better job IMO. I'm not saying the American courses are bad.

Given the complete absence of meaningful (any) standards in American Avalanche Education until very recently (AIARE standards only have become big recently http://www.avtraining.org/ ) you weren't really comparing anything, merely flatulating wildly. As for course length rolleyes.gif USFS Avy School is recognized "worldwide" for whatever the fuck that is worth too.

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I was aware of this course, and the other mentioned too, and I still stand by my opinion. And I HAVE taken some of the American Level 1 and 2 courses. The Canandians just did a better job IMO. I'm not saying the American courses are bad.

Given the complete absence of meaningful (any) standards in American Avalanche Education until very recently (AIARE standards only have become big recently http://www.avtraining.org/ ) you weren't really comparing anything, merely flatulating wildly. As for course length rolleyes.gif USFS Avy School is recognized "worldwide" for whatever the fuck that is worth too.

 

cry.gifthumbs_down.gif

 

Have you even taken the CAA course to formulate your own comparison/opinion? I get the impression that your answer is no...

 

The CAA course was the most comprehensive I've taken, and I don't need "somebody else’s standards" to tell me differently. It was evident on many levels, and it's no dis- to the USFS courses.

 

It's like this, if you take a number of courses, you can make a comparison for yourself. But until you do, you're just a Nodder; a serious one at that.

 

See you in the backcountry, or not.

 

the_finger.gifwave.gif

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The CAA course was the most comprehensive I've taken, and I don't need "somebody else’s standards" to tell me differently. It was evident on many levels, and it's no dis- to the USFS courses.

 

yelrotflmao.gif Broadly comparing US avalanche education to Canadian education - since there was no standard level of US education until recently, every provide did whatever the fuck they pleased. Some were really excellent, indepth, and organized. Somewhere were half stoned bc afficinados. Which ones did you take and where?Since there was no consensus on what a US course was until recently, while Canada had established standards, comparing the 2 countries is retarded.

 

I've taken a number of courses over 10 years and talked with a number of professionals (on several continents) about education standards, professional applicability, and usefulness. They think the CAA course is good. But for the same number of Class days some of the American Level 1-3 programs are good, as can be the USFS school. As always your $.02 may be different.

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The CAA course was the most comprehensive I've taken, and I don't need "somebody else’s standards" to tell me differently. It was evident on many levels, and it's no dis- to the USFS courses.

 

yelrotflmao.gif Broadly comparing US avalanche education to Canadian education - since there was no standard level of US education until recently, every provide did whatever the fuck they pleased. Some were really excellent, indepth, and organized. Somewhere were half stoned bc afficinados. Which ones did you take and where?Since there was no consensus on what a US course was until recently, while Canada had established standards, comparing the 2 countries is retarded.

 

I've taken a number of courses over 10 years and talked with a number of professionals (on several continents) about education standards, professional applicability, and usefulness. They think the CAA course is good. But for the same number of Class days some of the American Level 1-3 programs are good, as can be the USFS school. As always your $.02 may be different.

 

cry.gifcry.gif

 

Wanna argue over who makes the best beer too?

 

Or maybe we can argue over who had the best turns in the backcountry this weekend (I did BTW.) grin.gif

 

SO, have you taken the CAA course? rolleyes.gif

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SO, have you taken the CAA course? rolleyes.gif

So, which American courses did you take? It's the same with guiding - anyone can call themselves a guide in America but there are some excellent mountain guides in America. In Canada the average may be higher because of ACMG; doesn't mean you can't get a better guide in America.

 

Oh - I'm jousting with shadows! fruit.giffruit.giffruit.giffruit.gif

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