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cross-fit

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are you guys doing crossfit at a crossfit place or on your own? I have no choice but in a gym here since there is nothing for a few hundred miles...

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Matt, I go to my Gym and at work. Where do you go?

Do you know anyone else in spokane or Coeur d'Alene doing CF?

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Joe I go to Golds Gym to do mine and sometimes home. I met someone I think if from CDA. Maybe we can put something together once and a while. I can give you his name just give me a call.

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tabata that. after lying in bed for three days, its all i can manage.

 

...or at least i'll get the rest of it puked out!

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I am under impression, you get a lot of bulk when doing crossfit. Isn't it against the climbing wisdom? I saw these guys on crossfit.com - some look like sumo wrestlers. Doing more aerobics may keep the bulk off though.

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I don't have a bunch of extra weight to lose but I seem to be losing some bulk/weight. About 5 pounds in the last month. However, I usually do the cf workout and something aerobic addtional like a 5k run or cycling. I was wrecked yesterday.

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I am under impression, you get a lot of bulk when doing crossfit. Isn't it against the climbing wisdom? I saw these guys on crossfit.com - some look like sumo wrestlers. Doing more aerobics may keep the bulk off though.

 

Ehh...all the folks doing crossfit at the Kung Fu school DFA attends all look pretty F-ing lean, the frighteningly fit-looking instructor most of all. Most of those exercises seem to be about a lot of reps and a lot of variety, core strengthening, and the like. The sumo guys were probably doing crossfit to slim down, or maybe they couldn't kick the gallon-of-wonton-soup lunch habit.

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Does getting up to check email between naps count as cross-training, or do I need to incorporate, say, snacking, into my routine in order to see results?

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Well, if you're training for sleeping, as your frequent napping would suggest, then getting up to do anything would be mistraining, plain and simple. DFA would suggest that, if you must do something besides nap, have the necessary implements close at hand, so that you have to roll over at most. Best also to keep a supply of fatty, carbohydrate-rich snacks nearby as well, so that you can remain stuporous whilst fueling up for further hibernation.

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I am under impression...crossfit...Isn't it against the climbing wisdom?

 

Steve H and Vince A definitely benefitted from a type of Crossfit/Endurance Hybrid program as they 'hiked' (M5 X, 5.9, WI4) 4,100m up the Central Pillar of the Rupal Face on Nanga Parbat last september.

 

Crossfit can be incorporated into an endurance trainging program.

 

Oxygen Illusions: Using Crossfit to Improve Cardiovascular Endurance. Mark Twight/Mountain Mobility 2003-2004.

 

after 7 months of "surviving" his CF/Enduro hybrid program i have experienced negligible hypertrophic gains and HUGE gains in strength, power-endurance, and endurance, even moreso than ever before.

 

hard copy can be obtained from the man. (he asked to not circulate electronic copies (copyrighted material)).

mark@grivelnorthamerica.com or redemption@gymjones.com

 

"What you know does not matter - what you do matters...."

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Ehh...all the folks doing crossfit at the Kung Fu school DFA attends all look pretty F-ing lean

 

That's where I've been doing crossfit. I'm pretty lean.

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OK, explain me something.

Different types of climbing = different training needs.

 

I. Grade III-IV alpine climbing (snow and low angle ice - includes 8K nontechnical slogs):

 

You are pretty much using cardiovascular endurance and leg muscles. The upper body plays the secondary role as you go on 45-65 degree slope. It is mostly kicking, lifting legs, breathing hard. What benefits the most for this type of climbing? Probably trail-running, squads, biking and moderate weight-lifting. Do I need to stress my upper body by lifting 3xbody weight? I don't think so.

 

II. Interesting grade V-VI alpine (super-long, 45-65 degree ‘slogs’ + some relatively short stretches of vertical ice and rock - when you go slow anyway). Still, do you need monkey strength for your upper body? Probably not. Again, need cardio endurance and big legs (and very good technique!).

 

III. Big wall/multi-pitch ice climbing - agree, upper body strength is needed the most. Aerobics? Not really.

 

Question. I do lots of trail running, on uphill terrains - this strengthens not only cardio and the lower body, but also your butt and back. What else do you need? Is running uphill at the maximum level sufficient for getting in shape for the highest non-elite alpine climbing?

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TBay, Jon R, Erik W ... et al,

 

I have to do the mass communication here regarding the O2 Illusions paper (mentioned above), Gym Jones and short duration/high intensity training in general.

 

1) The paper was written to support the contention that short duration/high intensity work improves endurance. All of the science is in it. The paper is a bit over a year old and I am that year smarter but haven't had time to rewrite it so I'm not willing to send it out at the moment.

 

2) This type of training works, proven over and over. BUT ... it isn't complete, or specific and if improving endurance is your main goal you cannot get away from going long. That said, by increasing intensity you can cut into those hours and hours of long slow distance work and come out well ahead. One must still train specificity, technique. But having a higher level of general fitness (organic) improves the efficiency of one's technical practice (neurological) i.e. one may train technique without attempting to train fitness at the same time. There is a lot of training information on the Gym Jones site. Check the Knowledge section. This page will fill out as I have time. You can go back to 12/03 in the calendar to see daily workouts and glean some micro or macro scheduling ideas from there.

 

3) The Gym Jones site doesn't make recommendations, it is simply a place for us to record information and experience. What anyone else does with it is up to them. My areas of interest and the athletes I train are changing, fewer climbers, more fighters, though there are still a few ultra-endurance types around. Work affects the type of training I provide and do. For the last four months no one has done specific endurance work so you won't find much about it in the calendar. That will change.

 

4) Mass: you can put it on or lose it with any training program by modifying what you put in your mouth. With proper attention to diet most find it hard to gain size on a SD/HI training program. Some of the CF big boys can do a lot more pull-ups than most little boys, and run faster as well. Maybe "aerobic" training would help reduce bulk but it also compromises power, so one must decide which is more important (and be certain of the truth of that decision).

 

I haven't surfed the CC forum for about a year, and it may take that long to get back. "Enjoy" the training, and then USE the results ...

 

 

MFT

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Nice! thumbs_up.gif

So what do people eat? I totally suck at the nutrition aspect of things and get totally lost when the talk goes to percentages of carbohydrates and shit like that. I wish someone would tell me how much to eat of something and when, it would be so much easier. As for now I will probably continue to eat like shit.

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Well, I am in biomedical business - I don't believe that carbs make you weak (as some unscientific media sources tell you) . The body needs sugar to convert it into ATP, which is the main and the only source of energy. Fat can be utilized as the energy source but at much much slower rate. If you are lean and have lower body fat, and eat the low carb food while exercising - you'll achieve nothing but the catabolic breakdown of your muscles. So, eat plenty of meats (proteins) and sugar DURING exercise. You need fat to rebuild your cellular membranes that need to be continiously regenerated during exercise. Don't overeat carbs while in rest and mix them with slowly-digesting carbs and fibers (absorption rate is slowed). And don’t listen to the media! Moderation, moderation and moderation. smile.gif

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Lots of crossfitters also follow the Zone diet. If you get lost with %carb talk you'll probably get lost in the Zone too as it requires lots of measurements of your food intake which is regulated according to your lean body mass. Though once you get in the habit for a few weeks its really all not that hard and the little extra effort pays off big time. Basically its going to come down to how much you really care about improving. Crossfit and the Zone aren't for free; what you put in to them determines what you get out.

 

There is a crossfit message board for nutrition here:

http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/23/23.html

 

Last summer was the first summer I climbed while following the zone and it made a huge difference. Was a little tricky getting away from the typical carb/sodium loading of climbing eats but once I did eating was no problem.

 

Also endurance atheletes, and I think Twight's paper may go in to this (at least if its the same paper I read from a cf seminar a year or so ago), typically take multiples of the regular zone allocation for fat providing its good/beneficial fats.

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i do it at home about half the time. I basically do tabata that or one of the other workouts without real weights. I've been doing it for a couple of months now.

 

I can't say what results from just doing it at home would be, but for the past month and a half, i've been crossfitting all by myself since our group is homeless right now. It works. Its definitely better with a bunch of folks with psyche, but doing tabata that is miserable enough that i'm sort of happy not to have anybody around...

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