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egaibrev

EDK rappells

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I often use the square knot with the double fisherman's on the tails when my partner is afraid of the Euro Death Knot. As stated, I prefer it to the double fisherman's by itself because it is easier to untie.

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I'll ignore the obvious insult to my saintly mother to point out that tying your lady to the bed...IS AID!

 

yelrotflmao.gif

 

For different diameter ropes with the EDK, a simple overhand in the rope end could be the solution.

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I was refferring to the second picture in Matt's post as an Overhand Flat Knot or an EDK.

 

I tie my cordellettes together with this knot in order to untie them quickly and easily. I untie them a lot. There are a couple of reasons I do this.

 

First, I untie them in order to tie figure-eight knots in the ends. I can then clip the ends into side pieces of an anchor and use the cordellete as a webolette by pulling down the strands in between the pieces and tying it off with an eight.

 

Second, I climb in areas where there are not always a lot of slings left behind. Or I don't trust the webbing that has been left. For example, I climb in Red Rock most of the winter season. When I get here much of the webbing on the classic routes has serious sun damage from the summer heat. I will cut up my cordelletes to replace what needs to be replaced.

 

Third, as a climbing guide I often short rope clients with an open cordellete.

 

Fourth, there are a number of rock rescue techniques wherein I need more cordage than a closed cordellete will allow.

 

Lastly, I primarily use seven millimeter cord for my cordelletes. Nothing seems to move within the knot when I use my double overhand flat knots.

 

I think that covers it...

 

Jason

 

Add to that V-THREADS

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Can the EDK be used to join two ropes of different diameters for a rappell? How different can the diameters be?

 

I've heard conflicting things.

 

Discuss.

I think the best way to find out would be to go out to the garage and tie a couple of equal sized ropes together as well as several of dissimilar diameters and test them to see just how far from ideal you can go before the knot rolls or slips. Static rope might have different results.

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The EDK is not exactly the same as an overhand with long tails. The "EDK" is not a follow-through knot like what I believe folks in this thread are calling "overhand" (it is also called a "water knot").

 

Matt, an overhand is *not* a follow-through knot, so the EDK is indeed an overhand with long tails. Also there are no non-flat overhands, just poorly dressed overhands with two lines (though that would be tough to do accidentally).

 

Tie an overhand and look at what your tying hand does: it goes over the hand holding the rope while tying the knot; hence the name.

 

Climbing.com says that the overhand knot is simply a variation of the square knot. Riiiiight. And a variation of the bend sheet too then. (The bend sheet, or its double variation, by the way, is the perfect knot to use to tie together two lines of different diameter when the ropes are tensioned. It will slip without tension, so it wouldn't be great here.)

 

Note that it's only a death knot when non-Europeans tie it, trading tail length for rappel length wink.gif

 

drC - Pedantic

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I find using an EDK to tie rappel slings is quite nice for saving time and struggle in cold climates. When ice climbing, for example, tying an EDK takes no time at all and can be done with heavily gloved hands where as a dbl fisherman takes longer and may require more fiddling. I'm a wimp so that is my preference for the EDK in that situation.

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