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JayB

Online (The Climb) Question

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"the descent is convoluted and time consuming and many parties not already familiar with it have gotten off-route and endured forced bivouacs. The snafflehounds here are particularily ferocious."

 

[ 07-10-2002, 11:10 AM: Message edited by: Dru ]

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Bummer....

 

Anyway, I would like to point out that sometimes a really cool way to approach climbing is just to figure out something you want to do, look at a map, and then just go there. Figure it out yourself. Makes for a really cool adventure which is not directly related to route ticking, but proceeds the pitfalls of relying on erroneous beta, misinformed beta, the impassable bergshrund, etc...I've often thrutched through dense forests while REI crowds swarmed by on trails not more than a quarter mile away. There is something to say for taking the road less travelled away from the signposts of progress.

 

In the end you can say you did it all on your own and the real bonus is that you get to jungle death march, wade hostile streams, slip and slide on logs, battle bugs, pull on loose unclean rock...the adventure starts in your own mind instead of in a book through the eyes of someone else. There are other places outside of the boundaries of crowded classics and guide book hype.

 

Sure, you'll flail alot, but it will make you stronger...like the old guys back in the day. The true hardmen...content with simply being out there...

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mike, you are a dangerous man. thinking for yourself!!

 

adventure and shit....is that on mtv?

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Yes, it usually is a more rewarding climb when you didn't read about it, found the way on your own.

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quote:

Originally posted by mvs:

Yes, it usually is a more rewarding climb when you didn't read about it, found the way on your own.

First ascents are more fun than reinventing the wheel thrashing up a tourist route.

 

Lots of people read the guidebook and still have adventures... they come up to you and ask where the obvious gully is, having walked right by it 10 times.

 

I myself have driven up decrepit old logging spurs and thrashed instead of following the obvious new road leading towards the peak because a journal article so instructed me. Turned out the guy who wrote it confused east with west and was on the other side of the mountain. Duh.

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Thanks to all for the info on the climb and the clarification on the ratings. Even if a climb really is a III 5.10B R - apparently this isn't - that can mean a lot of things. All depends on where the 5.10 is in relation to the R. Based on what I saw of the slabs in the Platte a 5.10b R route there would be absolutely gut-wrenching and not anything I'd want to mess with.

 

However, most of the non-R 5.9 slab stuff, while thought provoking, was within my range, and the place isn't really known for soft grades or excessive bolting. But maybe I'll wear the double Carhartt's just in case.....

 

Thanks again for all of the information.

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Dude: You can handle it. If the fifth pitch looks like too much (it won't), then rap off and you've still had a good day. Give us a TR so we know you made it.

 

John Sharp

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