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Jens

first ascent [TR] TR- Johannesburg Mt. - CK route F.A. Grade V, 5.10b, AI 3+ 8/27/2005

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psuedo-death route snaf.gif

 

good explanationof the objective dangers of the route - you do make it sound much more reasonable.

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It sounds much better if your determination of the route's danger was correct. Whatever man, way to rock it, like I said, I'm not talking shit, I just thought it was a bit physco from the info available and I offered my armchair opinion. Good job guys, that's what I have to say.

 

bigdrink.gifwave.gif

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Maybe someone like Lowell Skoog could scan in the picture of the N. Face of J-Berg which is on page 58 of Tom Miller's Book. miller-1964.jpg THAT IS THE BOOK'S COVER, NOT J-BERG, WHICH IS ON PAGE 58

The picture is from 52 years ago, and It'd be great to see the comparison and what Jens and Loren's line would have covered then.

 

Not nearly up to Tom Miller standards but this was taken August 1976 from over near Torment.

 

5164Joberg_August_1976.jpg

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What part of Aug.? It sure looks different now . . .

 

Loren -- I thought your comments were excellent. And yes, the climbing on your route looks a lot less brushy -- maybe even more "fun," than the N.E. Butt.

 

Ivan -- you better add this one to your list.

 

John Sharp

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What part of Aug.? It sure looks different now . . .

 

Oops..my bad. The info for the slide actually says July. With rare exceptions I don't have dates for pix that old, only a year and a month.

It really doesn't matter though; the major difference is in the ice in the hanging glaciers.....how they used to be linked together and extend much lower.

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Maybe someone like Lowell Skoog could scan in the picture of the N. Face of J-Berg which is on page 58 of Tom Miller's Book.

 

Not nearly up to Tom Miller standards but this was taken August 1976 from over near Torment.

 

5164Joberg_August_1976.jpg

 

I'm looking at the picture in Tom Miller's book. MisterMo's 1976 picture actually shows more ice volume than Tom's 1952 picture. The two glacier segments right of the NE buttress are more solidly connected in MisterMo's picture and the snouts are thicker and more prominent. The Sill Glacier (adjacent to the C-J couloir) also looks thicker in Mo's picture.

 

I've read that the Northwest is subject to 20-30 year cycles of cold-wet and warm-dry weather. The period from the mid-1940s through the mid-1970s was a cold-wet one. MisterMo's picture probably captures the peak glacier volume on Johannesburg since the 1920s. Nice shot!

 

I don't want to post any of Tom Miller's pictures without his permission. If the above description isn't sufficient, I suppose I could ask him if it's okay to post. The pictures on my alpenglow.org site were posted with Tom's permission.

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Though I don't have such a good picture to show it, we downclimbed the CJ Couloir on July 20, 1999, and there were no cracks to contend with. Continuous snow and lots of rock fall. It was frozen quite hard, but not yet ice. By the third week in July this year, the snow wasn't even close to continuous.

 

Sharp

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Though I don't have such a good picture to show it, we downclimbed the CJ Couloir on July 20, 1999, and there were no cracks to contend with. Continuous snow and lots of rock fall. It was frozen quite hard, but not yet ice. By the third week in July this year, the snow wasn't even close to continuous.

 

1999 was a record snow year, of course. I skied the southwest route on Mt Buckner that very same day (7/20/99) and we managed to ski from Cascade Pass to the parking lot that afternoon. Hard to believe!

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1999 was a record snow year, of course. I skied the southwest route on Mt Buckner that very same day (7/20/99) and we managed to ski from Cascade Pass to the parking lot that afternoon. Hard to believe!

 

Was this on continuation of the trip that went from Rainy to Cascade PAss and over Logan? Which way did you use to get up Buckner?

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Was this on continuation of the trip that went from Rainy to Cascade PAss and over Logan? Which way did you use to get up Buckner?

 

No, it was a one-day loop. We went from the Boston Basin trail over Sharkfin Col, skied across the Boston Glacier and climbed the North Face, then skied the SW route and returned across Horseshoe Basin to Sahale Arm. Beautiful trip.

 

Sorry for the tread drift... Back to Johannesburg! wink.gif

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I'm looking at the picture in Tom Miller's book. MisterMo's 1976 picture actually shows more ice volume than Tom's 1952 picture. The two glacier segments right of the NE buttress are more solidly connected in MisterMo's picture and the snouts are thicker and more prominent. The Sill Glacier (adjacent to the C-J couloir) also looks thicker in Mo's picture.

 

I've read that the Northwest is subject to 20-30 year cycles of cold-wet and warm-dry weather. The period from the mid-1940s through the mid-1970s was a cold-wet one. MisterMo's picture probably captures the peak glacier volume on Johannesburg since the 1920s. Nice shot!

 

 

I just compared the book photo to mine & you are correct. I find that interesting as I had long blindly believed and assumed that Cascades glaciers had been more or less continually shrinking throughout the latter half of the 20th century.

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Walking up Cascade River Road, it's really exciting to kink my neck to let me look at Johannesburg and think about climbing a route like that. Thanks for the stimulation.

 

Great picture, MosterMo. Now I gotta go find a copy of that book and look at the older shot...

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Loren and Jens,

Congratulations on a great adventure! Since your route is a Grade V, I believe it qualifies for an entry in the AAJ. Please consider it.

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Walking up Cascade River Road, it's really exciting to kink my neck to let me look at Johannesburg and think about climbing a route like that.

 

Despite the icefall that fell right across their climbing line every few hours on Saturday? blush.gif

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Yeah, even with your icefall. What's acceptable or not is decided by my climbing partner and I. Phil, you're not invited.

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Yes, the picture was tweaked. Yes, it was tweaked without the photographer's consent. Yes, it was used without the photographer's consent (at least as far as he can remember).

 

If I'm wrong, correct me. If not, I'm sort of surprised that the NWMJ group would do this. Not that I would have objected, but it's nice to be asked first, especially when taking artistic license with someone else's work.

 

Here is the image after my post processing:

 

DSC01792.JPG

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