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peakbetty

Summit Food

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Canned chicken noodle soup, Raviolies, clam chower, Stew, anything that is low in fiber and tastes good. Mabey canned milk on fruit loops or something. This stuff is heavy, but it's not that heavy if your only talking about one night or so.

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Blueberry soup. Loads of suger and it always tast yummy. can drink it hot or cold. I buy it at IKEA.

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I'm guessing you are commenting on the weight of canned food, TLG, but if we are talking about camping on a summit, where there will presumably be no water supply, the extra weight associated with canned soup as opposed to dried soup would only be that associated with the can itself since you'd have to carry up the water anyway. And that canned soup may well be more hearty and gooder than knorr soup mix. Are a couple of apples lighter than an equivalent amount of canned applesauce, and might the cooking actually make it go down better as applesauce?

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i can see where the lack of water makes the canned goods more valuable, but it's not just the weight i would be concerned about - it's also the unforgiving bulk. personally i try to pick out hearty foods that pack well, and cans just wouldn't cut it in my 35L pack. but i guess if it is just one night (and one can) it might not really be an issue. and ravioli sounds damned good!!!

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ravioli is good. I usually take it out of the can, and pack it in a zip lock bag. Then no can, no bulk, but still yummy raviolis! nummy...

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And then there are the infinite possible variations on quesadillas. Black bean and cheddar. Chicken and monterey jack. Salami and mozzarella. A guy I know made chicken, red pepper, red onion, bacon, and jack. Trader Joes also sells really good smoked whole chicken breast in the lunchmeat section. I am thinking of trying chicken, pesto and mozzarella this weekend. They're good because they don't smash in your pack like a sandwich.

 

 

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and you've never had any incidents? i'm taking ravioli next time!

 

No incidents. I typically double bag, just 'cause I'm paranoid! Yep..SUPER YUMMY!!

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I'm not so sure about the "low-fiber" thing. high fiber stuff burns slower. I guess low fiber foods can be good in camp, but keep them in moderation. There is nothing worse than being constipated at 13,000 ft. If you adjust the normal amount of fiber you recieve to much, it will throw your digestive system out of whacxk for sure!

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it's a meat product. better to ask how it tastes and leave it at that. it's just one of those things you don't want to know too much about the origins of ... evils3d.gif

 

pair it with some sauternes and it's a match made in heaven.

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Does Foie Gras come in a can? If not, it'd be kind of like carrying your smoked oysters or sardines in a plastic bag.

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with all this can-talk just remember the can opener.

 

Whaddya t'ink da pick on da ice axe is fer? Ya lern dat in DirtBag Climber 101 cantfocus.gif

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On LR a couple of years ago, there was a group of guys from Tennessee that had brought up Prego sauce -- they'd emptied the jar into a zip-lock bag, and hauled it up without a problem.

 

My favorite high-altitude snack food is peanut m&ms -- you get your protein, your sugar, and your fat, and it melts in your mouth, not in your hand!

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I always bring a bag of Crispers. I've found that Power Bars, ClifBars, Luna Bars, chocolate bars.... they all have the same consistancy and are sweet. Whenever I bring out the crunchy, salty crispers, they are what EVERYONE wants to eat. The salty stuff tends to be bulky but light. Seems like salt is something our bodies need up there since everyone ends up craving it so much. Of course I'd never give up my chocolate... it's just nice to have options.

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Salt is important. But not as important as Fig Newmans. Don't settle for dried up nabisco. Spend the dough, go organic. I ate a whole bag last trip. Sweet, carby, fruit... Yum! grin.gif

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