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espirita

A good bathroom read?

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I've seen tons of books on "How to Rock Climb" or "Rock Climbing for Dummies" or what have you. Wondering if there was any one that is particularly good. I've been indoor climbing for about a year now and have just started to take it outside. I've also seconded some trad climbs (fascinating). Anyway, don't worry, I'm not trying to learn how to rock climb from a book, but I'd like a good reference for different knots, trad placements, anchoring, etc. Any suggestions?

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Freedom of the Hills - covers everything you want. for a beginner, FOTH is all you need. other books just give more depth/different perspectives.

 

How to Rock Climb (John Long)

Knots for Climbers

Traditional Lead Climbing: Surviving the Learning Years

Climbing Anchors

Accidents in North American Mountaineering

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Freedom of the hills is often referred to as "the bible" if that gives ya any idea of the content! Its a great book..covers EVERYTHING!! not a good read..but a GREAT reference! If you read it straight through...I'd have to say you're a little different...

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Freedom of the Hills

Accidents in North American Mountaineering

 

I'll give second votes to Freedom and Accidents. Freedom would perfect broke into 10 minute chunks.

 

For some reason my wife considers ANAM bedtime reading hellno3d.gif Still don't quite get that one, though it's a good way to learn what not to do. Second only to listening to Dru tongue.gif

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Freedom of the hills

 

Indeed, it is the perfect bathroom material: soft, strong, and highly absorbing.

You're referring, of course, to the quilted two-ply edition.

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I take along ANAM and read it in plain view of others at high camp. They react predictably. hahaha.gifhellno3d.gif

 

FWIW, FOTH is definitely a good reference. For awhile I hung onto all my editions of it. It became silly after while. wave.gif

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I'm having trouble finding the two-ply, so may have to settle for the regular "sandpaper" edition. OUCH. blush.gif Look forward to reading in 10-minute increments.

 

Someone actually gave me a copy of ANAM when they found out I was really getting into climbing. I think, fearing for my life, they wanted to discourage me. Interesting read, but obviously I haven't been discouraged. laugh.gif

 

BTW, what does FWIW mean. (Dumb question?)

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Fodder Which Is Worthless (FYI, really, what tomtom say).

 

Freedom and Accidents are must read. Climbing anchors and the sequel are great. And they're definitely perfect for bathroom because it's all chunked in one to two pages individual things. The Mountaineers publish a book called "From Gym to Crag" targeted at people like you who started inside and are coming out in the lght. I have no idea whether it's good; check your local library before commiting to a buy.

 

drC

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What if you learn it all in the john and then find out that when you are out on the glacier you have to drop your pants and squat before you can remember how to rig a Z-pulley? blush.gif

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...when you are out on the glacier you have to drop your pants and squat before you can remember how to rig a Z-pulley? blush.gif

 

Note: don't draw diagram on dingus.

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What if you learn it all in the john and then find out that when you are out on the glacier you have to drop your pants and squat before you can remember how to rig a Z-pulley? blush.gif

 

Well if you happen to witness such tomfoolery, at least you will know who it is and why.

 

What do I do?? moon.gif Ah yes I remember...

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For some reason my wife considers ANAM bedtime reading hellno3d.gif Still don't quite get that one, though it's a good way to learn what not to do. Second only to listening to Dru tongue.gif

 

My wife is the same way, but only wants to read the ones with fatalities. She asks me to flag them with Post-it notes for her easy reference...

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Any Else think that John Long in 'Anchors' is paranoid and thinks every setup is a death trap?

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"Only the paranoid survive."

 

And yes, I haven't seen many setups where everything is redundant, including the slings connecting the biners, the biners themselves, etc.

 

drC

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Nothing wrong with learning to climb from a book - combined with trial and error, of course.

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I'd love to see an anchor that is equalized from a variety of angles, and without the possiblity of extension should one piece blow.

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It could be done, but it would take six pieces. Probably not very likely in the field.

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OK, I'll bite.

 

Your best starting point is The Mountaineering Handbook, McGraw-Hill 2005. $13 at Amazon, one of the places where it has been well-reviewed and compared favorably to Freedom of the Hills, Alpine Climbing, Extreme Alpinism, and even Climbing Anchors. John Long wrote that TMH is "384 pages of gold," so he must have liked the index too. Try http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/det...ks&n=507846

 

In brief, FOH is much more old school and contains much unsafe or suboptimal advice. TMH is more modern in its thinking and technology, more practical, and has great illustrations. Most people find it's also more fun to read.

 

TMH covers general mountaineering, so the sections on rock climbing are only a fraction of the content, but there's still a lot of in-depth info on modern tools (autoblock belay devices, thin ropes, etc) and 5th class techniques. There's good advice on learning to lead, climbing fast, dealing with fear, and other important topics not covered elsewhere. The sections on climbing forces and anchor building contain unique insights that will be new even to experienced climbers. Climbers like you are one of its 3 target audiences; well worth the price of admission.

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I picked up Craig Luebben's "Rock Climbing: Mastering Basic Skills" ( http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0898867436 ) and highly recommend it as a nice all-around text and as bathroom friendly as any. Also in my bathroom is the Squamish Select guide, though I'm considering picking up McLane's newest guide (bringing my Squamish guide count to 4) as an upgrade smile.gif

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