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Fairweather

Glacier Peak access?

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So with the White Chuck Road (23) still out for the year, and the N Fk Sauk the same, what is the most 'convenient' approach to Glacier Peak this summer? From Lake Wenatchee via White River or Indian Creek to White Pass and then up White Chuck Glacier (remnant), Dissapointment Peak Ridge/Gerdine Glacier? I hear Glacier Peak Meadows is one of the most beautiful spots in the North Cascades and wouldn't mind a family outing along this route.

 

Or how about up Milk Creek to the PCT junction then the Dusty Glacier?

 

Ford the White Chuck bridge washout and bike the road? Then climb the Sitkum? (I've heard the trail to Kennedy Hotsprings was almost totally decimated, though.)

 

Any thoughts?

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If N Fk Sauk still washed out 6 miles before trailhead, then Milk Creek as you describe it would be shortest. White River approach is not only longer but more troublesome cross-country-wise.

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So with the White Chuck Road (23) still out for the year, and the N Fk Sauk the same, what is the most 'convenient' approach to Glacier Peak this summer? From Lake Wenatchee via White River or Indian Creek to White Pass and then up White Chuck Glacier (remnant), Dissapointment Peak Ridge/Gerdine Glacier? I hear Glacier Peak Meadows is one of the most beautiful spots in the North Cascades and wouldn't mind a family outing along this route.

 

Or how about up Milk Creek to the PCT junction then the Dusty Glacier?

 

Ford the White Chuck bridge washout and bike the road? Then climb the Sitkum? (I've heard the trail to Kennedy Hotsprings was almost totally decimated, though.)

 

Any thoughts?

 

How about the Suiattle River Road / Vista glacier approach?

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The Milk Creek approach starts from the Suiattle, but looking at the Darrington report last night, it now appears that this approach is out of comission until 2006 at least. (trail destroyed?) Some of the eastern approaches shown on USGS and Green Trails no longer exist, I'm told, such as Gamma Ridge (?) and trail #786 above Dusty Creek. The Darrington District seems to have suffered more flooding, glacial recession, erosion, trail abandonment, road/bridge destruction, etc than any other area in the Cascade Mountains the past 30 years!

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Washout on the NF Sauk Rd has been repaired (recently) and I understand it's driveable to the TH with a passenger car. That's probably the fastest/cleanest approach.

 

Alternatively, you could probably get a bike down Suiattle River Rd without too much trouble, but a number of bridges are still missing on the approach to Glacier from Milk Creek.

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From Darrington reaching Glacier Peak requires hauling your bike around the huge washouts, a 10 mile bike ride, then 5 plus miles of no more Kennedy Hot Springs Trail. Lots of Scrambling and A LOT OF WASHOUTS. But in 3 days I was able to get within 1500 ft. of the summit and back to my car.

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Alternatively, you could probably get a bike down Suiattle River Rd without too much trouble, but a number of bridges are still missing on the approach to Glacier from Milk Creek.

 

Does this mean you can't get into Downey/Bachelor Creek without bikes? It sounds as though it does.

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Alternatively, you could probably get a bike down Suiattle River Rd without too much trouble, but a number of bridges are still missing on the approach to Glacier from Milk Creek.

 

Does this mean you can't get into Downey/Bachelor Creek without bikes? It sounds as though it does.

 

To answer my own question, you can drive the Suiattle River Road to within a half mile of the downey creek bridge.

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To answer my own question, you can drive the Suiattle River Road to within a half mile of the downey creek bridge.

 

Is it reasonably feasible to ford the Suiattle? The NFS web site says they don't advise it, but...

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FWIW, yes, Glacier Peak Meadows is really really beautiful. I have been up there a few times as it is one of my favorite places.

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Nice tely skiing on the glaciers thereabout trad Memorial Day trip, do not know about this year as usual access is out.

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To answer my own question, you can drive the Suiattle River Road to within a half mile of the downey creek bridge.

 

Is it reasonably feasible to ford the Suiattle? The NFS web site says they don't advise it, but...

 

I don't know about fording the suiattle, but once you get to downey creek, someone built a ladder up to the destroyed bridge deck - hauling a mountain bike up there would be a pain..

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Can anyone tell me where these beautiful meadows are?

 

Along the PCT SSE of Glacier Peak in the area that drains the White Chuck Glacier (or what's left of it). The entire area along Red Pass and White Pass looks incredible too. I've never been there but it would be cool to see some pics posted here by those who have.

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Those of you who favor having access to the traditional trailheads might want to pay attention and write some letters or something. Some conservationists are seeking to block repair of the Mountain Loop highway and the White Chuck road, and funding is in short supply as well.

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To answer my own question, you can drive the Suiattle River Road to within a half mile of the downey creek bridge.

 

Is it reasonably feasible to ford the Suiattle? The NFS web site says they don't advise it, but...

 

I don't know about fording the suiattle, but once you get to downey creek, someone built a ladder up to the destroyed bridge deck - hauling a mountain bike up there would be a pain..

 

What would you need a mountain bike for?

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From Darrington reaching Glacier Peak requires hauling your bike around the huge washouts, a 10 mile bike ride, then 5 plus miles of no more Kennedy Hot Springs Trail. Lots of Scrambling and A LOT OF WASHOUTS. But in 3 days I was able to get within 1500 ft. of the summit and back to my car.

 

We need more people like you. That's pretty burly.

I've never been to Glacier Peak. i was thinking of going this year. Maybe a chopper would be the best weekend warrior approach as the trails and roads are out?

Can any of these alternative approaches easily be done on a 2-day time budget? Thanks.

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Those of you who favor having access to the traditional trailheads might want to pay attention and write some letters or something. Some conservationists are seeking to block repair of the Mountain Loop highway and the White Chuck road, and funding is in short supply as well.

 

Any specifics? You wouldn't be just trying to get me riled up now would you, matt? yellaf.gif

 

Also, I know this isn't spray, but the title of 'conservationist' does not apply to the road-closer anti-recreation crowd. Conservationist conjures up images of Teddy Roosevelt, John Muir, William O Douglas, et al. These were fair minded visionaries who didn't view man as anathema to nature. These more recent road-closers you speak of are environmentalist zealots who know how to manipulate our legal system in order to implement their anti-recreation jihad.

 

 

Anyway, thanks for the updated info on the N Fork Sauk. It looks like this is the way to go.

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That's no jive, Fairweather. For example, go to the NCCC websit and look at their winter 2003-2004 newsletter, page 6, where the guy celebrates what a great opportunity they have to get roads cut back in the wake of the washouts two years ago and says that they may even want to block repairs to even main roads like the Mountain Loop Highway. I'd have to say that I agree with their basic argument that road building SHOULD be undertaken with proper environmental analysis and careful consideration of construction impacts, and I also agree that there are lots of roads that we could probably do without, but a friend of mine on their board says that it remains true that many of their members are in fact against providing recreational access and use these "issues" as a tool toward that agenda. He actually encouraged me to suggest that some of my more recreation-oriented friends joint their group to offer a different perspective.

 

Obviously, it is a question of balance. Even we recreational junkies have to acknowledge that at least one portion of the Mountain Loop Highway that was wiped out is right in or immediately alongside the flood plain and they should be very careful about undertaking re-construction there.

 

In addition, we have to face the reality that their funding is being severely cut back and they can't afford to maintain all the roads that everybody would like. Maybe Congress should allocate more money for recreational access, but they are heading in quite the opposite direction.

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Remember when there was talk of paving MLH from Barlow Pass to Bedal? Now there's talk of closing it all together.

 

Environental Zealots is a good term for them, "conservationists" feeling lacking. I agee with Fairweather on that. Do these people not understand the needs of the peakbagger? Don't they care about us? cry.gif

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That's no jive, Fairweather. For example, go to the NCCC websit and look at their winter 2003-2004 newsletter, page 6, where the guy celebrates what a great opportunity they have to get roads cut back in the wake of the washouts ...

 

The NCCC, with the celebrity voice of Harvey Manning at the fore, has been an advocate for closing roads of all kinds for many years. Frankly, I'm not sure they have much pull with govt land managers. If you go back to his 100 Hikes series, you can see that ol' Harvey and NCCC have even been pushing for the closure of Middle Fork Cascade River Road! ( As well as the road up the other side from Stehekin.)

 

I do thank you for the heads up, and I will write a letter in the next couple of weeks re Mountan Loop Hwy. It's a shame that we have to ally ourselves with extraction interested inholders to keep our recreational access roads open.

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Planning to do Glacier Peak via White Chuck Glacier and Disappointment Peak in two weeks. Not sure if I'll have a partner or not. How risky would soloing the White Chuck Glacier be? Is it as benign as the Columbia above Blanca Lake?

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Planning to do Glacier Peak via White Chuck Glacier and Disappointment Peak in two weeks. Not sure if I'll have a partner or not. How risky would soloing the White Chuck Glacier be? Is it as benign as the Columbia above Blanca Lake?

That's a route I've wanted to do for quite a while. I believe you can now get to Glacier Gap without putting a foot on the the Whitechuck Glacier. Death of a Glacier

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