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      WELCOME TO THE CASCADECLIMBERS.COM FORUMS   12/08/21

      Thanks for visiting Cascadeclimbers.com.   Yep, we are still going!    Just put a new coat of paint on the site. Still the same old community of climbers, skiers, and people who love to get outdoors. Hope you had a great 2021, and wish you the best for 2022 and beyond.  Thanks again for stopping by.
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minx

follow the leader

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"razor sharp tweekers" is not a bad band name.

 

A better band name would be "the bomb-sniffin' dogs". You could work the whole terrorism angle and make a killing (so to speak).

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They would do a tour schedule of all the broken down shacks in the coast range and outside Estacada. Only the finest cardboard/plywood dumps need apply. The show would finish with the entire venue blowing up and guys dressed up as fat cops everywhere sticking DARE stickers on minivans and whatnot.

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Back to the topic, I would say that (within reason) you are probably going to be "qualified" to try a lead as soon as you feel ready to do so. Some people will study the nuances of placing pro and equalizing anchors and agonize over all the technical stuff for years before they feel competent to try the sharp end, and they may even still feel they need to complete several "practice leads" with a top-rope as a back up before they do a "real" one. Others will just jump up and throw theirselves at it on their first weekend of climbing. I wouldn't suggest the latter approach, but I do think a relatively inexperienced climber can safely try leading if they first practice placing and removing gear on the ground (receiving feedback from somebody who knows what they are doing), if they have followed and cleaned at least a couple dozen routes that are roughly similar to what they intend to lead, and if they have practiced downclimbing technical rock so they will be capable of retreating should it prove necessary. With what some might call a modicum of preparation and some common sense, it is not unreasonable to try to lead a moderate climb (the guidebooks generally point out climbs that are dangerous and you obviously should not try one of those). It might be a good idea to wait until you have an experienced climber who is willing to watch and who you think could get you out of a jam should you get in trouble, but in general I think common sense and caution will go a long ways to keep you out of trouble. You sound as if you are not likely to be someone who is foolish enough to try a serious lead before you are ready.

 

[ 11-21-2002, 04:48 PM: Message edited by: mattp ]

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Half way up Devils Tower my climbing partner complained to another member in our party "Man, I have to lead every pitch."

I picked up the lead on the next pitch [smile]

 

As far as progression: Try leading all the climbs you can in your given range at whatever crag you are at. When that feels 'good' try the next grade.

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The debate was somewhat more esoteric than a specific question relating to my actual ability/desire to lead difficult routes. My partner and I were recently in Leavenworth. He got himself into a bit of trouble on lead. We'd had the debate at the time about his ability to lead the route. Fortunately all's well that ends well and no one was hurt or anything like that. It did however lead to knocking back more than a few beers to soothe some nerves. We began to discuss our respective history of leading routes. It was just interesting to really think about how and why we each made or decisions. I'm not strong enough right now that I'd really choose to lead anything. I know exactly what I could lead now if I needed to. I tend to be very comfortable w/my abilities and which routes I will lead and when I won't. I'm not a particularly ambitious climber so I've got no sense of urgency about leading the tough stuff. I'll get there again but for now it's just nice to be back on the rocks.

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quote:

It might be a good idea to wait until you have an experienced climber who is willing to watch and who you think could get you out of a jam should you get in trouble, but in general I think common sense and caution will go a long ways to keep you out of trouble

Exactly.

 

A) My first time outside (I had been in the ym for a couple of months, but no leads) - it looked fun. I figured I was strong enough to pull the moves.

 

B) The next day outside. the guy I was with got to the anchors and whipped before clipping. He was unwiling to go clip the anchors for me on what was then as hard a climb as I had ever completed, inside or out. It didn't seem like I would hit anything (he didn't) and the gear was good (bolts), and I wanted to do the climb. I think I also whipped (and whimpered).

 

Ever since then, the decision is always based on 3 questions at each piece of pro:

1) is there a chance I'll fall?

2) if so Is the fall safe?

3) If no to number 2), iis it worth lowering off than just going up anyway?

 

Cheers!

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Unfortunately experience usually only comes from making bad decisions. Like this one time at the Winthrop brew pub, T.A. was like order the Bushwacker its so good! So I ordered a pint and it tasted like shit! It was super thick and sour, like 50% alcohol or some shit. Fortunately noone was hurt becuase T.A. drank the rest of it and I had a budweiser. But now that I've gained that experience I know BEFORE I order a pint, not to go for the bushwacker but to stick with the pale ale!

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Now ed, there's your problem. You drink that piss called budweiser and think it's beer. In order to learn to drink a better beer you must gain experience by practicing. As many in this thread it's best to just jump right in and try something challenging. Next time order the Obsidian Stout.

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