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Lambone

Climber Dog's

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In DFA's experience, good crag dogs pretty much sit still and don't bark every time something moves. They don't jump on people, try to eat your food, or step on ropes. The whole "sit still and be quiet" thing is pretty much the key element, though.

 

Some meathead at Smith a while back had a couple of mutts with him over at Rope de Dope, and he was just letting them go apeshit; they were barking for several minutes straight, which was fully audible on the other side of the river. Someone finally came over from Morning Glory to see whose dogs they were and if maybe they could be quieted, and the dog owner basically told the guy to get fucked, and pretty soon threats of an asskicking were being swapped. So, maybe being a considerate dog-owner is part of the equation, too. It's awesome when dog owners take responsibility for their animals, and deal with them (i.e. get them to stop being obnox. or remove them from the area for a while until they chill) when they're being obnoxious.

 

That's the Doctor's dos pesos.

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Yeah, good point DFA. It seems that the cool crag dogs are the ones who are well trained all around.

 

What about multi-pitch climbs? Do you bring the dog and tie them up, or let them roam, or leave them at home...

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dog better be mellow as kenny g. for multipitch stuff. nothing worse than a barking mutt as the owner tries to calm it down from 1 pitch up as he belays the leader [Mad]

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

dog better be mellow as kenny g.

[laf] That's fuckin' hilarious! [laf]

 

Lambone,

 

There really is a lot to be said for the good owner, too. So many dog-at-crag issues could be alleviated if people with problem dogs accepted that their dogs are causing problems, rather than acting like it's no big deal. It's not so much a problem that dogs start acting like dogs every once in a while, it's just that when people let common sense go out the window when it comes to their dogs. Most people would never run around the crag, jumping on belayers, stepping on ropes, and snuffling for sandwiches in other people's packs, but too often dog owners will ignore the same behavior from their pooch.

 

Anyway, thanks in advance for wanting to be considerate with your dog.

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Get a haulbag for your pooch for multipitch or leave it at home.

 

The best type of dog for alpine climbing is St Bernard with keg full of whiskey under its jowls.

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First off -- I love dogs.

Second -- I love climbing.

 

BUT having said that, I really think there are times when the two should not mix. In congruence with DFA, a lot comes down to the owner. Yappy dogs are no fun to listen to while climbing, and often the owners think it's cute and perhaps adoring.

 

At the crags, sure, dogs can be tolerated for the most part, and to mirror DFA's point, the dog should be pretty much sleeping. I have had someone dog come over, pick up a piece of MY webbing, carry it over to the shade below a tree, and commence chewing. By the time I found out, I was pretty much convinced that I was out the cost of the pre-sewn, BUT the fucking owner and her friend thought it was truly funny. I should have asked for ten bucks, but I was too pissed off and left the area.

 

Alpine, dogs have no business being there. I have seen ignorant fucking people bring their dogs up to very sensitive alpine environments and seen them tearing up the fragile flowers and soil while engaged in pursuit of wild birds, causing them undue stress and burning their energy stores off. Again, no leash and the couple found it endearing and exciting. This time I said something, not being nasty, just explained what was really happening there. Their reaction = clueless and careless. Dogs can have a large impact on the wilderness, hell we do enough damage, do you really need to bring your dog into the alpine??? Pick a nice trail, put the dingo on a leash and pick up his steamers and dispose of them properly.....

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quote:

Originally posted by iain:

dog better be mellow as kenny g. for multipitch stuff. nothing worse than a barking mutt as the owner tries to calm it down from 1 pitch up as he belays the leader
[Mad]

True that...

 

A friend of mine just leaves her dog untied to roam, not sure if that is anymore responsible...

 

of course it all depends on the circumstances, length of the climb, and area...

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Start your dog early by not encouraging it to bark at every friggin thing that moves. Also, try to expose it to as many people and other dogs as possible so strangers aren't something to get excited about. I have a dog that will never be off leash so she stays tied up when I'm climbing, but she usually just chills and falls asleep.

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quote:

think another important issue to consider is the neutering of males.

E-rock please report to the nearest emergency room for immediate castration. It won't have any effect on your personality, really! [laf] I had my male German Shepherd fixed when he was about 5 months old (too many red rockets) but I kinda wish I waited a little longer. He is plenty protective when he needs to be but is super mellow overall. We don't take the dogs (we also have a female German Shepherd) to the crags unless we know it will be just us. That only happens at the Bat Caves and Baker Rocks.

 

[ 11-13-2002, 11:19 AM: Message edited by: Mr. Natural ]

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quote:

Originally posted by Mr. Natural:

E-rock please report to the nearest emergency room fot immidiate castration. It won't have any effect on your personality, really!
[laf]

Amen.

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Having a dog will affect when and where you choose to go climbing. Sometimes, you'll have to make arrangements to leave him at home. Sometimes, you'll choose to go somewhere less crowded.

 

I started taking my dog climbing as a puppy so he'd get used to it. At first he would moan and groan when I got off the ground, but now he just falls asleep. If there's anyone else around that he might bother, I leash him. I bring a bowl of water, maybe something to chew on, and sometimes even a blanket so he can snooze in comfort while we climb.

 

Just try and expose him to lots of people, dogs, and situations while's he's young. Be aware of other people, and don't let him bother someone who's belaying or get into their stuff or piss on their rope.

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1. Dogs keep the snafflehounds away from your pack.

2. Dogs are chick magnets. (Lambone, I know you're a newlywed so watch out!)

3. Dogs dig you out when you've been buried by an avalanche.

4. Dogs love you when no one else does.

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"NO DOGS!!!!!"

 

This is what you say when they give you that stare while eating anything that has a crinkly wrapper sound.

 

I do love Baskin, Tina, Jake and Khumbu though.

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or chew up a ballpoint pen and get ink on the new-ish carpet. D'oh. At least it is watersoluble... -

 

but how can you be mad at that face...

 

[ 11-14-2002, 06:12 PM: Message edited by: icegirl ]

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quote:

Originally posted by E-rock:

Dogs are territorial and male dogs will fight if they still have the jewels. If people need a studly dog, perhaps they should train it to perform the marital duties as well.

While your point is well made, I do not believe it is accurate. I don't have all the answers, but I've trained dogs professionally and as an amateur (field trial competition) for about 15 years. Territorial aggression isn't less common in castrated males than it is in non-castrated males. Dogs do have territorial instincts, but they are not closely related to the hormonal reproductive systems; territoriality is a pack instinct, not a reproductive behavior, for the most part.

 

However, the training and management of non-castrated males takes a bit more savvy and experience. Clipped dogs (like gelded horses) tend to be "beginner friendly" and even bad training generally doesn't have much impact. Conversely, good training has less positive effect on them; they are just de-tuned all around.

 

Sadly, many folks castrate their males and then assume training is no longer necessary, aggression won't be a problem, etc. I've been bitten badly by dogs only three times in my training career - all three times by castrated males. Cutting their nuts off doesn't make them nice as if by magic!

 

Many other folks have made good points, most of which I agree with: the breed matters alot; early socialization is REALLY important; some dogs just aren't cut out for being good crag dogs, no matter how much training.

 

I'd add that dogs, in my experience (having trained hundreds of dogs and watched their owners with them), tend to mirror much of the personality of their owner/pack master. Obnoxious, uncaring, sloppy dogs often have owners of a similar ilk. If you ask a higher standard of your pup, s/he will likely rise to the challenge and key off of your consistent standards of acceptable behavior. If you let stuff slide, don't learn about basic dog training techniques, and generally don't act as a good and caring leader to your canine companion, you'll end up with problems.

 

I've had 4 or 5 dogs over the years that have done lots of cragging with me. One thing: as someone else said, given enough time your pup will eventually inconvenience someone else, no matter how careful you are. Accept responsibility, say your are sorry, and offer to make amends. Most folks are more than happy to deal with dogs if they are well-behaved and have a responsible master along for the ride.

 

Speaking of rides, Frasier sometimes gets his paws wet away from the crags. . .

-

 

Peace,

 

D-d0g

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-

 

I've taken both these dogs on alpine climbs (the yellow one, Max, did a one-day Glacier Peak climb with me a few years ago.)

Max started life a stray, and has been known to hunt and kill rabbits and mice at the tree farm across from my inlaws' home (where he lives.) However, I have never seen him catch or bother an animal on a hike. I expect that wild animals are a lot more aware of dogs approaching, and so they'll make themselves scarce before your average domestic dog is aware of them.

Except marmots, of course, who seem to enjoy taunting Max (Maisie, the white one, ignores them) and then popping into their hole at the last possible minute.

 

In general, I think, an older dog (like, 5 or more) is going to be a lot more mellow about hanging out in the sun at the crags (with a chew toy or a bone?) but a younger one will do the 20 mile hikes better.

 

It's always good form, even if you're "sure" your dog is a perfect gentleman on the trail, to pack along a leash, just in case.

 

And, has I think already been mentioned, a basic obedience class will go along way to helping everyone like your dog as much as you do.

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Lamby,

Saw you the other day and my advice is that your doggie hang out with my doggie, they pick up good habits that way. That is if you think that my doggie is cool and all. The sooner you get them on off leash duty the better, but this is a matter of trust. You both have to learn to trust each other. Yeah, doggies can tell if you don't trust them. Cars suck, I don't think there is an easy way to teach them about the dangers of them moving hunks of metal, but it's a nicesity. I'll give you no advice, everyone I tell my philosophy on that one hates me, but it works. The key is to teach the doggie slowly to watch your ass, 'cause that's thier job, not to keep a constent eye on them. That just takes time. And remember there are no bad dogs just bad owners. [Wink]

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there is something to that (teaching the dog to keep an eye on you) mine does now (took some time and patience), and it is great!

 

[ 11-16-2002, 09:37 PM: Message edited by: icegirl ]

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quote:

Originally posted by icegirl:

Lambone,

 

That is one darn cute pup!

Thanks! She's been keeping me busy, but it's puppy nap time now...

 

That was crazy meeting you in the park! Right on. Let me know if ya wanna meet for a dog romp some time [Wink][big Drink]

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quote:

Originally posted by icegirl:

or chew up a ballpoint pen and get ink on the new-ish carpet. D'oh. At least it is watersoluble...
-

 

but how can you be mad at that face...

You can't! That's the whole point... what a darling dog. Icegirl, I might need some help in the training arena....

 

Lam, I want to see a pic of your dog. I love dogs, waited YEARS to get one. Happened upon the right puppy a year ago. He's now 14 months old, Landseer Newfoundland with mild hip dysplasia. I think I exacerbated his condition taking him hiking too early. At least with a smaller dog you don't have to worry about their growth pattern damaging the skeletal system. I don't think he will ever be a hiker or even a "hanging out at the crag" dog, I am too vigilant with his clumsiness (partially puppy-hood, Newfies are puppies till 2 years) and worried he'll break a leg. If a 40 lb dog breaks a leg, we can carry her out. If Dragon breaks a leg, I'll have to call SAR.

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