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Jens

rope diameter and price?

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Why do single ropes get way way more expensive the skinnier they get? Doesn't less material make for a cheaper and quicker product to make?

For instance, company "X" makes a 60m 9.4mm and charges $200+ for the thing-- And it makes a 60m 10.5mm and charges $99. Especailly when both ropes are in the same line by comapny "X" and are made on the same loom. Are they just gouging us bad?

__

Also what rope brand's specs on diameter run on the fat or skinny side? Ever notice that one brand of 10mm is like another brand's 10.5mm?

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I suspect becuase there is more demand for 9.4mm.

 

If people demand more of a product, you can get away with charging a higher price.

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...Also what rope brand's specs on diameter run on the fat or skinny side? Ever notice that one brand of 10mm is like another brand's 10.5mm?

 

Diameter of rope is measured under load. I assume the 80 kg test load, but I'm not sure.

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smaller diameter also means less weight = more convenience...therefore higher price?

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I suspect becuase there is more demand for 9.4mm.

 

If people demand more of a product, you can get away with charging a higher price.

 

Based on sales, I see wayyy more demand for 10.2-10.5mm ropes than for anything sub-10mm. The price/demand relationship only works up to a point, until the supply catches up to demand. At some point if demand is high enough, production gets ramped up to a volume that starts bringing the unit cost of production down, and competitive pressures force the manufacturers and retailers to pass those lower costs on to the consumer in the form of lower retail prices. More than anything that's why 10.5s cost less than 9.4s - they're making far more of the stuff, so it's cheaper. So in this instance, the lower demand product (9.4mm rope) ends up costing more precisely because there's less demand for it.

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Here, homo, why don't you shut the fuck up? madgo_ron.gif

 

Fuckin' dwarf-ass bitch. mad.gif

cry.gifcry.gifcry.gifcry.gifthe_finger.gif

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sorry 'bout that, bitch...i was out climbing (well trying to anyway) yesterday...yelrotflmao.gif

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I suspect becuase there is more demand for 9.4mm.

 

If people demand more of a product, you can get away with charging a higher price.

 

Based on sales, I see wayyy more demand for 10.2-10.5mm ropes than for anything sub-10mm. The price/demand relationship only works up to a point, until the supply catches up to demand. At some point if demand is high enough, production gets ramped up to a volume that starts bringing the unit cost of production down, and competitive pressures force the manufacturers and retailers to pass those lower costs on to the consumer in the form of lower retail prices. More than anything that's why 10.5s cost less than 9.4s - they're making far more of the stuff, so it's cheaper. So in this instance, the lower demand product (9.4mm rope) ends up costing more precisely because there's less demand for it.

 

Thanks for that explanation!

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