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gyselinck

Plastic Boots

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Define "alpine".

 

If you are getting a pair of plastics for climbing in the Cascades, anything in the Cascades, you should reconsider and examine some of the fine alpine climbing oriented leather or psudo-leather boots out there.

 

$.02

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I call bullshit. I wear leather Scarpa Freneys a lot but for winter alpine climbs, cold days ice climbing, and wet spring alpine sloppy snowpack slogging, plastic boots keep my feet notably warmer and significantly drier than leather. I am willing to accept a little bit of klunkiness and a small weight penalty for the extra comfort of dry and warm. I wear Koflach Verticals cause they fit my feet nicely and (unlike Scarpa Inverno/Vegas) have a gussetted tongue and hence stay waterproof in wet conditions.

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I call bullshit.

They said WA/OR rolleyes.gif It doesn't get cold, and the trips aren't long enough that you worry about drying out your boots. Buy Alphas - if your lucky you can trip with crampon on and put a hole in them!

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Agree with Drew. I climb with Koflach Degres in winter (lighter liner but I think same shell as the Verticals). Very nice to take the liners out and put them in the sleeping bag if they're a bit damp with sweat - or just to keep them un-frozen. Can't do that with leathers unless you care not for your bag.

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I call bullshit.

They said WA/OR rolleyes.gif It doesn't get cold, and the trips aren't long enough that you worry about drying out your boots. Buy Alphas - if your lucky you can trip with crampon on and put a hole in them!

 

and we all know that wa/or area climbers would never do anything like climb at lillooet or in the rockies or in the coast mountains! and places like the pickets or the summit of rainier are doable sub-5 hours so its all warm, dry leather day trips hahaha.gif

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the differences between plastics and leathers when strapping on slowshoes, or putting your mountain boots in AT bindings for a short or long ski approach to a climb, is also negligible right tongue.gif

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Scarpa Alphas

 

Scarpa yes, but I would recommend the Invernos. Warmer boot and a good technical boot. But it is all on the fit. I have had people tell me that the Alphas fit better. My thoughts on plastics, if I step out of my car and there's snow, I'm wearing plastics, dirt - Leather Scarpa Eigers. Ice climbing - of course plastics no matter what is on the ground, hopefully some sort of white stuff.

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I like plastics for long, straightforward things, like going up 40-50° snow/ice all day. Plastics are a very nice, comfortable platform for this, and yes, they are warm. They are easier on your calves, and easier on your toes when you are kicking all day. They also ski better if that is a factor in the equation. I have found the Scarpa Inverno to do all these things quite well, and it has seen action around the globe for years now. I have hiked in long distances in them, and to be honest, I think they might hike better than the la sportiva leathers I have.

 

I'm sure someone would be willing to sell you some, as plastic boots are not the trendy thing right now.

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and we all know that wa/or area climbers would never do anything like climb at lillooet or in the rockies or in the coast mountains! and places like the pickets or the summit of rainier are doable sub-5 hours so its all warm, dry leather day trips hahaha.gif

There are so many climbers up in Lilloet and the Coast Range rolleyes.gif

 

They work fine, and are more comfortable. And on a weekend trip dry fine, many days are different. And snowshoes work with everything, as long as your not a fermented maple syrup addled Canadian. Spray on Dru rolleyes.gif Must suck that the seasons officially dead hahaha.gif

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I think it depends a bit on the leather boot your talking about. I have a pair of Nepal Extremes that while not quite as warm as a pair of plastics climb significantly better. Snowshoes and skis with leathers are going to suck, but like skiing in plastics doesn't. The lighter the leather boot the more pronounced the difference from plastics.

 

I'm with Alex - I've never worn my plastics climbing in the PNW (did Rainier in leathers - got cold feet, so what). I think the only advantages plastics have is that they're easier to dry on multi day trips and they warmer if it's really cold. So for the Cascades you don't get as much out of them as you would elsewhere.

 

For my money the Invernos climb about as well as a ski boot. But maybe I just don't get a good fit. Everyone I know with Alphas seems to like them. I have large feet so can't wear them.

 

So take your choice. If you do a lot of 1-2 day drips in the Cascades then leathers might be for you, especially if you're choosy with your weather windows. If you're into long trips and bad weather or you spend a lot of time in the Rockies in winter then look at some plastics.

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I still havent heard the definition for "alpine" in this context.

 

I've worn plastics once in the last 5 or so years for alpine climbs and I have done a few rolleyes.gif winter alpine and ice trips in the Cascades, Lillooet, and Rockies during that time. Its true that plastic boots have their place: on -25'C days in the Rockies, ice climbing for example.

 

However, who said anything about Freneys? I wear Freneys too, and do not recommend them for winter. However, I also wear other boots that I would recommend for winter! Fact is, I made no specific recommmendation did I? I just suggested there are some very worthy options that happen not to be made of plastic that are perfectly suitable for alot of winter and cold weather climbing. There as been alot of discussion specifically on footwear on this site, and it really will come down to personal preference and cash, I am just trying to help someone from plunking down a chunk of money on a decision they might regret if the definition of "alpine" is something like the N F Chair, Hood, Rainier, or any other of our Cascade jewels.

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Alex speaks the truth. No reason that I can think of to get plastics for WA/OR.

 

Regardless of what you guys think, we do get really cold weather here. Frost nip on the end of my pinky toe from last weekend proves this. And waking up to wet frozen boots in the morning for 2 days, taking 20 min or more to get them on just sucks. (even when I put them next to my chest to try to keep them warm durning the night), thats my reason for wanting plastics. Also, when I was ice climbing at banks and it was 3 degrees out, not including wind chill, ect...My synthetic boots didn't seem to do the trick. I don't just sit and wait for good weather like a lot of people and I don't have the money to travel to the good weather, in fact, I don't even have a car, yet I still manage to climb 4 - 5 days a week. evils3d.gif I climb in all conditions, I just need something nice and warm for my feet. But, I'll admit, maybe you guys are all badasses and I am just a wimp. bigdrink.gif

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Freneys - Right. If you're going to compare leathers to plastics then at least pick a reasonably full weight leather like the Nepal or Scarpa Cumbre or Boreal G2(?). What boots do you have now?

 

Can anyone recomend a good plastic climbing boot for alpine stuff?

...

Regardless of what you guys think

They why ask rolleyes.gif

 

It's all about fit. Even more so with a plastic boot, it's not going to form to your foot like a leather or break in. If it don't fit on day one it's never going to.

 

There are only like half a dozen to choose from. Go try them all on and pick the one that fits and climbs best. The Alphas definitely have the lowest profile so probably climb the best but are maybe not as durable.

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Stemalot was bitching about his cold feet in Cumbres and describing how much he wanted to get plastics during our climbing in January. YMMV. rolleyes.gif

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They why ask rolleyes.gif

 

Hey, I like how you took apart certain words I said and reagranged them to make it sound like I said something different. There is a name for that. It's done in politics a lot. You should run for president of CC.COM, I'll vote for you!

 

I dont know why they why ask. I ask because I was just looking for good recomendations. Just like the majority of you guys, I climb as well. I know the basics that fit is the most important element of boots, etc, etc, etc. I was just hoping somebody could throw down some good suggestions as to brands or particular boots that I might want to check out, or warn me of some that just suck. The synthetic boots I have now are these really light red La Sportiva's, not sure what model they are off the top of my head.

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i have the koflach degree (orange ones) i love them, np complaints. with a liner sock and heavy sock they are good to -30. took them on rainier last year in 100mph winds, warm. very comfy, no breaking in. they are finicky with the crampons, hybrids don't hold firm, i have g-12 crampomatic, works great.

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You might try on a pair of nepal extremes if sportivas fit you. They are like bedroom slippers compared to the Invernos, and they are fairly warm. Unfortunately, they are quite expensive.

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You might try on a pair of nepal extremes if sportivas fit you. They are like bedroom slippers compared to the Invernos, and they are fairly warm. Unfortunately, they are quite expensive.

 

Yeah, I have been eyeing those. I bitch when I have to pay 99 cents for a sniker bar, but I have no problem throwing down money for climbing. When it comes to climbing, cost is no object. tongue.gif

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You might try on a pair of nepal extremes if sportivas fit you. They are like bedroom slippers compared to the Invernos, and they are fairly warm. Unfortunately, they are quite expensive.

 

 

Yeah, I have been eyeing those. I bitch when I have to pay 99 cents for a sniker bar, but I have no problem throwing down money for climbing. When it comes to climbing, cost is no object. tongue.gif

 

I have a pair of older Nepal Tops ... they rockband.gif but they are not that warm for winter outings ... check out these bad boys ...

 

Trango Extreme evo gtx

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